UNIT II

CURVES & SURFACES

• The need to represent curves and surfaces arises in two cases:

– In modeling existing objects (a car , a face, a mountain)

– In modeling “from scratch” where no preexisting physical object is being represented

• In first case mathematical object may be unavailable.

– One can use as a model the coordinates of the infinitely many points of the object but this not
feasible for computer with finite storage.

– We merely approximate the object with pieces of planes, spheres or other shapes the t are
easy to describe mathematically and require that points on our model be close to
corresponding points on the object.
• In second case, the user creates the object in the modeling process.

– To create the object the user may sculpt the object interactively, describe it mathematically
of give an approximate description to be “filled in” by some program.

– In CAD the computer representation is used later to generate physical realizations of the
abstractly designed object.
Curves and Surfaces
• Often we are required to represent surfaces that are
not planar in nature.

• To do so the parametric representation of 2-D curves
and 3-D surfaces may be employed.

• In general for any genus of surface or curve, there is
both a parametric and an implicit representation.

• In computer graphics it is often more convenient to
adopt the parametric form.
Three most common representations for 3D surfaces are
– polygon mesh surfaces
– parametric surfaces
– quadric surfaces
• How do we draw surfaces?
– Approximate with polygons
– Draw polygons
• How do we specify a surface?
– Explicit, implicit, parametric
• How do we approximate a surface?
– Interpolation (use only points)
– Hermite (use points and tangents)
– Bezier (use points, and more points for tangents)
Polygon mesh
• A polygon mesh or unstructured grid is a collection of
vertices, edges and faces that defines the shape of a
polyhedral object in 3D computer graphics and solid
modeling.

• The faces usually consist of triangles, quadrilaterals or
other simple convex polygons, since this simplifies
rendering, but may also be composed of more general
concave polygons, or polygons with holes.
A cross section of curved object and its polygon representation

polygon mesh representation
Pointers to a vertex list
V=(v1,v2,v3,v4)={(x1,y1,z1)………(x4,y4,z4)}
P1={1,2,4}
P2={4,2,3}
–Each vertex stored just once, considerable space is saved
–It is still difficult to find polygons that share an edge
–Shared edge are drawn twice

Pointers to an edge list
V=(v1,v2,v3,v4)={(x1,y1,z1)………(x4,y4,z4)}
E1={v1,v2,p1,*}
E2={v2,v3,p2,*}
E3={v3,v4,p2,*}
E4={v4,v2,p1,p2}
E5={v4,v1,p1,*}
P1={E1,E4,E5}
P2={E2,E3,E4}
E=(v1,v2,p1,p2,…pn)

Avoid
•redundant clipping
•Transformation
•Scan conversion
If Edge is shared by
n no. of polygon
Explicit representation

P={(x1,y1,z1),(x2,y2,z2),(x3,y3,z3),………..(xn,yn,zn)}
v1
v2
v3
v4
v1
v2
v3
v4
p1
p2
p1
p2
E1
E2
E3
E5
E4
Explicit Representation

P={(x1,y1,z1),(x2,y2,z2),(x3,y3,z3),………..(xn,yn,zn)}

• Curve in 2D: y = f(x)
• Curve in 3D: y = f(x), z = g(x)
• Surface in 3D: z = f(x,y)
Problems:
• How about a vertical line x = c as y = f(x)?
• Circle y = (r
2
– x
2
)
1/2
two or zero values for x
• Too dependent on coordinate system
• Rarely used in computer graphics

• For single polygon: space efficient
• For polygon mesh: much space is lost
because of duplicity of vertices and edges
• One can not find all polygons that share
the vertex and all its incident edges
interactively
Implicit Representation
• Curve in 2D: f(x,y) = 0
– Line: ax + by + c = 0
– Circle: x
2
+ y
2
– r
2
= 0

• Surface in 3d: f(x,y,z) = 0
– Plane: ax + by + cz + d = 0
– Sphere: x
2
+ y
2
+ z
2
– r
2
= 0


Sphere definition
• For example, the implicit form of a sphere is:


• In general all implicit representations of a 3-d surface
are of the form:


• The parametric form of a sphere is:

x y z r
2 2 2 2
0 + + ÷ =
f x y z ( , , ) = 0
f :( , ) (cos cos ,sin , cos sin ) u o u o u u o 
Parametric form
• The general form of a 3-d surface in its parametric (or
explicit) representation is:


• When rendering such curves and surfaces using
polygons, the parametric representation is more
convenient as the surface is defined in terms of a
parametric variable or variables.

• This allows the exact determination of the value of the
surface at regular intervals, thus allowing an
approximation to the surface by taking a number of
such “samples”.
f u v f u v f u v f u v
x y z
( , ) ( ( , ), ( , ), ( , )) =
Example - 1
• determine the representation of the function f(u) =
sin(u).
• This is a parametric description of a curve in 2
dimensions with parameter u.
• This is an example of an unbounded curve (in that we
can take values of u from -·...+·. We’ll limit our
curve to the domain (0...2t). This gives the following
curve:


• Now we must determine how fine or coarse a representation we need
to use in order to faithfully capture this curve.
• We will sample the curve at regular intervals of u along the length of
the curve. In this example, the curve will be sampled at regular points
a unit distance apart (i.e. at u = 0, 1, 2...).
• This yields the following sample points which we will join by straight
lines which is the way the curve will be finally displayed on the raster:
Representing Curves
There are many different methods of representing general
curves. The most common are:

– Cubic Splines
– Bezier Curves
– B-splines
– NURBS and |-splines

Interpolation vs. Approximation
• Given a set of n points, to create a curve we either
– interpolate the points (curve passes through all points)
– approximate the points (points describe convex hull of
curve)
• Points on curve = knot points
• Points on convex hull (off curve) = control points
Interpolate
Approximate
Control points
Convex hull
knot points
Splines
• To interpolate we can use a simple polynomial spline.
With n points we require a polynomial of degree n-1
(order n polynomial).
• Let f(u) be the parameterised polynomial where 0 s u
s 1

( ) b au u f + =
( ) c bu au u f + + =
2
( ) d cu bu au u f + + + =
2 3
Linear Quadratic Cubic
Splines
• These polynomials are plots of f(u) with respect to u
– for each u, there is one and only one f(u)
¬curve cannot turn back on itself

• Use polynomials for each axis (in 2D we have 2
polys):



• As before we limit u to [0,1], although the polynomial
is defined for all values of u.



( )
( )
y y y y
x x x x
d u c u b u a u y
d u c u b u a u x
+ + + =
+ + + =
2 3
2 3
( )
( )
y y y y
x x x x
d u c u b u a u y
d u c u b u a u x
+ + + =
+ + + =
2 3
2 3
( )
( )
( )
( ) ( ) ( ) | | | | ( ) C u p . 1
2 3
2 3
2 3
2 3
= ÷

= ÷
¦
)
¦
`
¹
+ + + =
+ + + =
+ + + =
u
d d d
c c c
b b b
a a a
u u u u z u y u x
d u c u b u a u z
d u c u b u a u y
d u c u b u a u x
z y x
z y x
z y x
z y x
z z z z
y y y y
x x x x
Splines
• For a 3D spline, we have 3 polynomials:
( ) u p
Defines the variation in x with
distance u along the curve
12 unknowns
4 3D points required
• If we have more than 4 points we
require a polynomial of higher
degree
–higher degree polynomials are more
difficult to control
–they exhibit unwanted wiggles
(oscillations)








Quadratic Cubic Quartic Quintic
Splines
• In general we use cubic polynomials for curves in
CG:
– minimal ups & downs and faster to compute than
high degree polynomials
– lowest degree which allows non-planar curves
(quadratics require 3 points, 3 points always lie in
the same plane)
Splines
Defining the Cubic Spline
• Normally we supply 4 points we wish the spline to pass through. These
are
– 2 endpoints
– 2 derivatives of the end points

• If we have more than 4 points we must employ more than 1 spline ¬
use a piecewise cubic polynomial
– for n points, we have (n÷1)/3 individual cubic segments
– without further constraints these will not join smoothly
smooth non-smooth
Curve Continuity Piecewise Curve Segments
• To ensure a smooth connection between curve segments we
enforce further continuity constraints
• 2 types of continuity:
– parametric continuity, denoted C
n
where n = degree of
continuity
– geometric continuity, denoted G
n
• Given a curve such that at point p, 2 segments c
i
(u) and c
i+1
(u)
meet then:
( ) ( )
0
1
1 =
+
=
= ¬
u
n
i
n
u
n
i
n
n
du
u c d
du
u c d
C
( ) ( ) 0 1
1 +
= =
i i
c c p
( ) ( )
0
1
1 =
+
=
¬
u
n
i
n
u
n
i
n
n
du
u c d
du
u c d
G o
differentials are equal differentials are proportional
Geometric continuity
• In this case we require only parametric derivative of two curves
to be proportional to each other at their intersection point
• If two curve segments joint together there curve has G
0

continuity
• If the direction of two segments tangent vectors are equal at
the joint point the curve has G
1
continuity
• In CAD G
1
is often required
• Mathematically….
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
1
0
1
G
du
Q d
du
P d
G
du
dQ
du
dP
G Q P
n
n
n
=> ·
=> ·
=> =
Parametric Continuity
• 0
th
order
– Here curve simply meets
• 1
st
order
– If the tangent vectors of two curves segment are
equal (in direction as well as in magnitude) at the joint
point
• 2
nd
order
– If both the first and second parametric derivatives of
the two curve section are same at the their
intersection
• N
th
order
– If the nthe derivative are equal at the joint point.
• since we want these curves to fit
together reasonably ...

Zero order parametric continuity
First order parametric continuity
Second order parametric continuity
Examples of Continuity
c
0
c
1
c
2
Cubic Parametric Curves
• A curve segment p(u) is defined by constraints on
end-points, tangent vectors, and continuity between
curve segments.
• Each cubic polynomial has 4 co-efficients, so four
constraints will be needed.
• Remember:




• This allows us to formulate 4 equations in the 4
unknowns, and then solve for the unknowns.

( )
( )
( )
( ) ( ) ( ) | | | | ( ) C u p . 1
2 3
2 3
2 3
2 3
= ÷

= ÷
¦
)
¦
`
¹
+ + + =
+ + + =
+ + + =
u
d d d
c c c
b b b
a a a
u u u u z u y u x
d u c u b u a u z
d u c u b u a u y
d u c u b u a u x
z y x
z y x
z y x
z y x
z z z z
y y y y
x x x x
Geometry Matrix
• To see how the co-efficients can depend on 4 constraints, recall that
a parametric cubic curve is defined by

• Rewrite the co-efficient matrix as where
– M is a 4x4 basis matrix,
– G is a 4-element matrix of geometric contraints, called the geometry
matrix.

• The geometric contraints are just the conditions, such as endpoints,
or tangent vectors, that define the curve.
– Gx refers to the column vector of just the x components; Gy and
Gz are similarly defined
• G or M, or both G and M, differ for each type of curve.
C u· = ) p(u
M.G C=
Geometry Matrix
• The elements of G and M are constants so the
product G.M.u is just three cubic polynomials in u.
• Expanding:







( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) | | | |

= =
4
3
2
1
44 43 42 41
34 33 32 31
24 23 22 21
14 13 12 11
2 3
1
G
G
G
G
m m m m
m m m m
m m m m
m m m m
u u u u z u y u x u p
| |

=
z y x
z y x
z y x
z y x
g g g
g g g
g g g
g g g
m m m m
m m m m
m m m m
m m m m
u u u
4 4 4
3 3 3
2 2 2
1 1 1
44 43 42 41
34 33 32 31
24 23 22 21
14 13 12 11
2 3
1
Blending Functions
• We can read this equation in the following way:
– The point p(u) is a weighted sum of the columns
of the geometry matrix G, each of which
represents a point or a vector in 3-space
• Multiplying out just x(u) gives:


x
x
x
x
g m um m u m u
g m um m u m u
g m um m u m u
g m um m u m u u x
4 44 34 24
2
14
3
3 43 33 23
2
13
3
2 42 32 22
2
12
3
1 41 31 21
2
11
3
) (
) (
) (
) ( ) (
+ + +
+ + + +
+ + + +
+ + + + =
Blending functions
Blending Functions
• This emphasizes that the curve is a weighted sum of
the elements of the geometry matrix.

• The weights are each cubic polynomials of the
parameter u, and are called the blending functions.

• The blending functions B are given by

• This is similar to piecewise linear approximation, for
which only two geometric constraints (i.e. the
endpoints of the line) are needed.

• So each curve segment is a straight line defined by the
endpoints G1 and G2 :
M u·
Linear Interpolation (straight line)



We can represent it’s equation in three ways
1. As weight average of control points
X (u)=(1-u) g
1x
+ u g
2x

2. As polynomial in t
X (u)=(g
2x-
g
1x
) u + g
1x

3. As matrix form




G1
G
2

÷
=
1 0 1
1 1
] g g [ ) (
1x 2x
u
u x
B
0
(t) p
0
+B
1
(t)p
1
Blending function
When t=0  p
0
, t=1p
1
, t=.5 midpoint
Curve is based at p0 & a vector(p
1
-p
0
)is
added which is scaled by t
Geometry Matrix, Geometry Basis,
Polynomial Basis
• The key to defining a parametric cubic curve
therefore lies in the basis matrix M.

• Depending on the nature of this matrix, specific
forms of curves may be created.

– HERMITE CURVE
– BEZIER CURVE
– UNIFORM NONRATIONAL B-SPLINE
– NONUNIFORM, NONRATIONAL B-SPLINE
– OTHER SPLINE FORMS
Hermite Curves

• The Hermite form of a cubic polynomial
curve segment is determined by
constraints on the endpoints P
1
and P
4
,
and tangent vectors at the endpoints R
1

and R
4
.

• NOTE: LATER P2, P3 WILL BE USED INSTEAD OF TANGENT VECTORS TO DEFINE THE CURVE
Hermite Curves - Examples
P
1
P
4
R
1
R
4
Only the direction of R
1
varies
Only the magnitude of R
1
varies
Hermite Geometry Vector
• The Hermite Geometry vector G
H
is





• G
Hx
is the x component of G
H
so:

=
4
1
4
1
R
R
P
P
G
H

=
x
x
x
x
Hx
R
R
P
P
G
4
1
4
1
Hermite Curves
• The Hermite basis matrix, M
H
, relates the Hermite
Geometry vector G
H
to the polynomial co-efficients.

• Therefore:



• where


Hx H x x x x
G M T d t c t b t a t x · · = + + + =
2 3
) (
| | 1
2 3
t t t T =
Hermite Curves
• The constraints on x(0) and x(1) are found by direct
substitution into the previous equation:

| |
| |
x Hx H
x Hx H
P G M x
P G M x
4
1
1 1 1 1 ) 1 (
1 0 0 0 ) 0 (
= · · =
= · · =
Hermite Curves
• The tangent vector constraints on x(0) and x(1) are
found by differentiation, i.e:




• So:


• and
| |
Hx H
G M t t t x · · = 0 1 2 3 ) ( '
2
| |
Hx H x
G M R x · · = = 0 1 0 0 ) 0 ( '
1
| |
Hx H x
G M R x · · = = 0 1 2 3 ) 1 ( '
4
Hermite Curves
• The four constraints can be written in matrix form as:




• The only way that this equation can be satisfied is if
M
H
is the inverse of the given 4x4 matrix, so:




Hx H Hx
x
x
x
x
G M G
R
R
P
P
· ·

= =

0 1 2 3
0 1 0 0
1 1 1 1
1 0 0 0
4
1
4
1

÷ ÷ ÷
÷
=

=
÷
0 0 0 1
0 1 0 0
1 2 3 3
1 1 2 2
0 1 2 3
0 1 0 0
1 1 1 1
1 0 0 0
1
H
M
Matrix Inverse
Hermite Blending Functions
• We know that:



• The Hermite blending functions B
H
are given by , since
these weight the geometry vector G
H
.
• Therefore:








H H
G M T t p · · = ) (
H
M T ·
= · = · =
H H H H
G B G M T t p . ) (
( )
( )
4
2 3
1
2 3
4
2 3
1
2 3
) (
) 2 (
3 2
1 3 2
R t t
R t t t
P t t
P t t
÷
+ + ÷
+ + ÷
+ + ÷
Hermite Curves - Blending Fuctions
P
1
P
4
R
1
R
4
t
f(t)
1
1
Labels show
which geometry
element is
weighted.
Two Hermite curves joined at p4
p
1
p
4
p
7
Y(t)
t
0 ,
7
4
7
4
4
1
4
1
>

withk
R
kR
P
P
and
R
R
P
P
x
x
x
x
Both curves share a
common end point
with G
1
continuity
• End