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Marine Rifle Squad

TERMINAL LEARNING OBJECTIVES


Without the aid of reference, given 782gear, assigned weapon, and assignment as a member of a squad, execute individual actions in squad formations, to assume assigned positions in each formation, in accordance with the references.

ENABLING LEARNING OBJECTIVES

a. Without the aid of reference, given a list of alternatives, select the mission of the Marine Rifle Squad, in accordance with references. (MCCS.14.02e) b. Without the aid of reference, given a list of alternatives, select the composition of the Marine Rifle Squad, in accordance with references. (MCCS.14.02f) c. Without the aid of reference, given a list of alternatives, select the composition of a fire team, in accordance with references. (MCCS.14.02g) d. Without the aid of reference, given a list of alternatives, identify the responsibilities of the squad leader, in accordance with references. (MCCS.14.02h)

ENABLING LEARNING OBJECTIVES

e. Without the aid of reference, given a list of alternatives, identify the responsibilities of the fire team leader, in accordance with references. (MCCS.14.02i) f. Without the aid of reference, given a list of alternatives, select the definition of fire control, in accordance with references. (MCCS.14.02j) g. Without the aid of reference, given a list of alternatives, select the key elements of controlling a fire team formation, in accordance with references. (MCCS.14.02k)

OUTLINE

MISSION ORGANIZATION GRADES AND DUTIES SQUAD AND FIRE TEAM FORMATIONS MISSIONS AND TYPES OF PATROLS PATROL ORGANIZATION PATROL LEADERS PREPARATION

MISSION

The mission of the Marine Rifle Squad is to locate, close with, and destroy the enemy by fire and maneuver, or to repel the enemy's assault by fire and close combat.

ORGANIZATION
The squad consists of: (1) Thirteen men.

(2) One squad leader.


(3) Three fire teams consisting of four men each

The Fire Team


The fire team is built around the firepower provided by the squad automatic weapon. The four members of the fire team are: (1) The fire team leader (2) The automatic rifleman (3) The assistant automatic rifleman (4) The rifleman

GRADES AND DUTIES


The squad leader is the senior man. He is usually a Sergeant. The squad leader carries out the platoon commander's orders. He is responsible for: (1) The discipline, appearance, training, control, conduct, and welfare of his squad at all times. (2) The condition, care, and economical use of its weapons and equipment.

Squad Leaders Duties


(3) He commands the squad, giving orders and ensuring that they are carried out. (4) He sets the example. (5) He instructs his squad on everything from general military subjects to small unit tactics. (6) In combat, he is responsible for the tactical employment, fire discipline, and fire control of his squad.

Fire Discipline

Fire discipline is achieved when the unit has been trained and maintains strict adherence to instructions regarding the proper use of its organic weapons.

Fire Control

Fire control is the leader's ability to have his men open, shift, or cease fire at the instant he desires. It also refers to the leader's ability to regulate the unit's rate of fire.

Squad Leader

The squad leader's weapons are the M16A2 service rifle and bayonet and his ability to properly employ his squad/ teams. (an extension of his body)

Fire Team Leader

Usually a Corporal. He carries out the orders of the squad leader. The fire team leader positions himself where he can best observe and control the fire team while carrying out the squad leader's orders.

Fire Team Leader

He is also responsible for the fire team's fire discipline, fire control, condition, care, and economical use of its weapons and equipment. Normally, he is close enough to the automatic rifleman to exercise effective control of his fires.

Fire Team Leader

In addition to his duties as fire team leader, he serves as the fire team's grenadier. In the offense, he uses the M203 for marking targets and directing the fire of his team. In the defense, it is used to cover dead space in the principle direction of fire (PDF) of his fire team's automatic weapon.

Fire Team Leader

The senior fire team leader serves as the assistant squad leader. (APL) His weapon is the M16A2 service rifle with attached M203 grenade launcher and KBar knife. (His ability to effectively employ his team)

Automatic Rifleman

The automatic rifleman is usually a Lance Corporal. He carries out the orders of the fire team leader.

Responsibilities Of Automatic Rifleman

The effective employment of the squad automatic weapon (SAW) and the condition and care of his weapon and equipment. The automatic rifleman must be ready to assume the role of fire team leader, if necessary. COMPETANT

Responsibilities Of Automatic Rifleman

His weapons are the M249 squad automatic weapon (SAW) and the K-Bar fighting knife.

The Assistant Automatic Rifleman


Usually a Lance Corporal He is primarily a rifleman but also assists the automatic rifleman by carrying the spare barrel bag and additional ammunition for the SAW.

The Assistant Automatic Rifleman

He is responsible for the effective employment of his weapon and for the condition and care of his weapon and equipment. His weapons are the M16A2 service rifle and bayonet. The assistant automatic rifleman is trained to assume the duties of the automatic rifleman.

The Rifleman

His weapons are the M16A2 service rifle and bayonet. Every rifleman should be trained as a point man.

The Rifleman

Private or Private First Class. He carries out the orders of the fire team leader. He often receives training as a scout and is responsible for the early detection of the enemy in his squad's sector. He is responsible for the effective employment of his weapon and for the condition and care of his weapon and equipment.

Squad Symbols
Fire Team Fire Team Leader Rifleman Automatic Rifleman Assistant Automatic

Column

(1) Facilitates control and rapid movement. (2) Favors fire and maneuver to the flanks. (3) Is vulnerable to fire from the front. (4) Fire to the front is limited. (5) Used when speed and control are governing factors, such as when moving through densely wooded areas, fog, smoke, and along roads and trails.

Column

Wedge

(1) Facilitates control. (2) Provides all around security. (3) Formation is flexible. (4) Fire is adequate in all directions. (5) Used when enemy situation is uncertain and terrain and visibility require dispersion

Wedge

Echelon Left (Right)

(1) Is difficult to control. (2) Movement is slow, especially under conditions of reduced visibility. (3) Provides heavy fire power to the front and in the direction of the echelon. (4) Used to protect an open or exposed flank.

Echelon Left (Right)

Skirmishers Right (Left)

(1) Is difficult to control. (2) Provides maximum firepower to the front. (3) Used when the location and strength of the enemy is known, during the assault, and crossing short open areas.

Skirmishers Right (Left)

MISSIONS AND TYPES OF PATROLS

Patrol Defined. A patrol is a detachment of ground forces sent out by a larger unit for the purpose of: Gathering information Conducting security missions Carrying out destructive or harassing missions

Reconnaissance Patrols

The commander needs information about the enemy and the terrain he controls. Information must be timely and accurate, to assist his decisions. Reconnaissance patrols are one of the most reliable sources for this information.

Reconnaissance Patrols

A reconnaissance patrol is capable of carrying the search for information into the area occupied by enemy forces, usually beyond the range of vision or ground observation, and is capable of examining objects and events at close range.

Missions

Reconnaissance patrols include gaining information about: identification of enemy units and equipment the location and characteristics of friendly or hostile positions unusual enemy activity routes, stream/river crossings, obstacles, or terrain

Area reconnaissance

A directed effort to obtain detailed information concerning specific terrain or enemy activity within a specific location. Information about a particular town, bridge, road junction, or other terrain features or enemy activity critical to operations Emphasis is placed on reaching the area without being detected.

Zone reconnaissance

A directed effort to obtain detailed information concerning all routes, obstacles, to include chemical or biological contamination, terrain, and enemy forces within a particular zone defined by specific boundaries.

Route reconnaissance

A reconnaissance along a specific line of communications, such as a road, railway, or waterway, to provide information on conditions and activities along the route. Terrain features that can control the use of the route must be reconnoitered.

Considerations For Route Recon

Traffic-ability Locations of obstacle emplacements. Critical points Danger areas The route reconnaissance is narrower in scope than the zone reconnaissance.

Combat patrols

Combat patrols are assigned missions that usually require them to actively engage the enemy. As a secondary mission, they collect and report information about the enemy and terrain. Employed in both offensive and defensive operations

Combat patrols
Inflict damage on the enemy Establish or maintain contact with friendly or enemy forces Deny the enemy access to key terrain, probe enemy positions Protect against surprise and ambush.

Five Types of Combat Patrols


Raid. Ambush Contact Security Patrols Economy of force (R.A.C.E.S)

Raid

Destroy or capture enemy personnel or equipment, or destroy installations, or free friendly personnel who have been captured by the enemy, and then conduct a planned withdrawal.

Ambush

Ambush patrols conduct ambushes of the enemy patrol, carrying parties, foot columns, and convoys.

Contact

Contact patrols establish and maintain contact with friendly or enemy forces.

Economy of force

Economy of force patrols perform limited objective missions such as seizing and holding key terrain to allow maximum forces to be used elsewhere.

Security Patrols

Security patrols detect infiltration by the enemy, kill or capture infiltrators, and protect against surprise or ambush. Security patrols are the most common type of combat patrols.

PATROL ORGANIZATION

The patrol leader task organizes the patrol into units and teams required to accomplish the mission.

General Organization

PL determines all essential tasks that are required to accomplish the mission. Then assigns units to carry out each essential task. Existing units task organization should be preserved (e.g., fire teams and squads). Squad may pick up specialist

Headquarters Element

Controls the patrol Includes the patrol leader, assistant patrol leader, radio operator, and corpsman.

Security Element

Secures the objective rally point, isolates the objective, and covers the patrols withdrawal from the objective.

Assault Element

Tasked with actually engaging the enemy

Support Element

Provides supporting fires for the assault units attacks and covering fires if required for its withdrawal.

PATROL LEADERS PREPARATION

The troop leading procedures listed below are aids in the preparation for executing assigned mission: They assist leaders in making the best use of time
All the steps should be done and completed in sequence.

B.A.M.C.I.S.

Begin the planning Arrange for recon Make recon Complete the Planning Issue the order Supervise

BEGIN PLANNING

When a warning order is received, the squad leader considers the time available to him. Reverse planning

ARRANGE FOR RECONNAISSANCE AND COORDINATION

The squad leader selects a route and prepares a schedule for reconnaissance and coordination with adjacent and supporting units.

MAKE RECONNAISSANCE
On his reconnaissance, the squad leader completes his estimate of the situation. Ex: Map recon, walking the terrain, leaders recon.

COMPLETE THE PLAN

Upon his return from the reconnaissance, the squad leader completes his plan of action.

ISSUE THE ORDER

If possible, the squad leader issues his order to the same personnel he took with him on his reconnaissance from the vantage point he had selected earlier. All members of the operation must be present.

SUPERVISE ACTIVITIES

The squad leader continuously supervises his unit to ensure that his orders are carried out as intended.

Questions?

References

1. FMFM 6-5, Marine Rifle Squad 2. MCWP 3-11.3, Scouting and Patrolling