THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK

A temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique product, services or result.
◦ Temporary: a definite beginning and end ◦ Unique: „different‟ from similar products/services

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application of knowledge, skills, tools and techniques to project activities to meet project requirements

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Identifying requirements Establishing „SMART‟ objectives Balancing competing demands cost, time, scope and relevant level of quality Adapting plans and activities to the different interests of the various stakeholders

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Integration Scope Time Cost Quality Human Resources

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Communication Risk Procurement

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The PMBOK Application area knowledge, standards & regulations Understanding the project environment General management knowledge & skills Interpersonal skills

Cultural and social environment International and political environment Physical environment

      Effective communication Influencing the organization Leadership Motivation Negotiation and conflict management Problem solving .

and ◦ project management office . Project management exists in a broader context that includes ◦ program management. ◦ portfolio management.

 A Program is a group of related projects managed in coordinated way to obtain benefits and control not available from managing them individually. .

Organizations manage their portfolio based on specific goals: ◦ Strategic objectives ◦ Capabilities/risk tolerance ◦ Efficient use of resources .

A PMO is an organizational unit that centralizes and coordinates the management of projects under its domain. PMOs can operate on a continuum from:  Support ◦ Training ◦ Software selection ◦ Policies and procedures To  Direct management and responsibility for project objectives .

the phases become the project life cycle .“Divide and Conquer”  A project is divided into phases ◦ Better management and control ◦ Moure logical links to operation  Collectively.

 . The project life cycle defines the phases that connect the beginning of a project to its end NOT to be confused with the project management process group.

    Specific deliverable (s) Technical transfer or hand-off Specific start/finish of each phase Finish of a phase marked by a review of deliverable(s) and performance  Reviews pre-determined .

. or whose interests may be affected as a result of project execution or project completion The project management team MUST identify the stakeholders. determine their requirements and expectations and to the extent possible.  Individuals and organizations who are actively involved in the project. manage their influence in relation to the requirements to ensure a successful project.

      Functional Projectized Weak matrix Balanced matrix Strong matrix Composite .

Project Characteristics/ Organization Type Functional Matrix Projectized Weak Matrix Project Manager‟s Authority Resource availability Project Manager‟s Role Who Controls the project budget Project Management Admin Staff Little or None Limited Balanced Matrix Low to Moderate Low to Moderate Full-time Mixed Part-time Strong Matrix Moderate to High Moderate to High Full-time Project Manager Full-time High to Almost Total High to Almost Total Full-time Project Manager Full-time Little or None Part-time Functional Manager Part-time Limited Part-time Functional Manager Part-time .

 PROJECT MANAGER – WHAT. WHEN? FUNCTIONAL MANAGER – WHO. HOW?  .

limited to recommendations of specific policies and procedures on individual projects. May range from advisory influence. to a formal grant of authority. .

quality. time. wants & expectations  Balance demands of scope. cost. resources & risk .To be successful a project team must:  Select and use appropriate process group processes  Define an approach to meet project and product requirements  Comply with requirements to meet stakeholder needs.

The Plan ---.Do ---.Check ---.Act Cycle  Linked by results  Output becomes input .

3. Initiating Planning Executing Monitoring and Controlling Closing Process groups are NOT project phases!  .1. 5. 4. 2.

Principal output:  Project charter  Stakeholder register Stakeholder management strategy  .

          Develop the project management plan Collect requirements Define scope Create WBS Define activities Sequence activities Estimate activity resources Estimate activity durations Develop schedule Estimate costs           Determine budget Plan quality Develop HR plan Plan communications Plan risk management Identify risks Perform qualitative analysis Perform quantitative analysis Plan risk responses Plan procurement .

 Direct and Manage execution        Perform quality assurance Acquire project team Develop project team Manage project team Distribute information Manage stakeholder expectations Conduct procurements .

 Monitors performance against plan and baseline Influences factors that could circumvent integrated change control  .

hand off the completed product to others or close a cancelled project .The closing process group includes that processes used to    formally terminate all activities of a project or a phase.

 Process groups are linked by the objectives they produce The output of one generally becomes the input to another or is a deliverable They are overlapping activities that occur at varying levels of intensity throughout the project   .

 Essentially performed in same order on most projects Source of MANY questions  .

THE PROJECT INTEGRATION MANAGEMENT .

unify and coordinate the various processes and project management activities within the project management process groups. . define.Includes the processes and activities to identify. combine.

1 Develop Project Charter 4.3 Direct and Manage Project Execution 4.5 Perform Integrated Change Control 4.4 Monitor and Control Project Work 4.4.2 Develop Project Management Plan 4.6 Close Project or Phase .

Develop Charter | Develop Project Management Plan | Direct & Manage Execution | Monitor & Control Work | Perform Integrated Change Control | Close Project or Phase .

 The CHARTER formally authorizes a project Issued by someone external to the project organization The result of: ◦ Needs analysis ◦ Business case ◦ Situation statement   .

2 Business Case .5 Organizational Process Assets .1 Project Statement of Work .1 Inputs .4 Enterprise Environmental Factors .3 Contract ..

Based on business needs Support for strategic plan   . A narrative description of products or services to be supplied by the project.

. Any and all of the assets that are used to influence the project‟s success can be drawn from organizational assets.

.1 Expert Judgment .2 Tools and Techniques .

integer or multi-objective programming algorithms . Benefit measurement ◦ Economic $$  Net present value (NPV)  Return on investment (ROI)  Payback ◦ Scoring  Mathematical models – linear. nonlinear. dynamic.

1 Project Charter ..3 Outputs .

 Select processes to be used       How work will be executed How changes will be monitored Performance measurement Stakeholder communications Management reviews Summary or detailed .

1 Project charter .4 Organizational process assets .3 Enterprise environment factors ..2 Outputs from planning processes .1 Inputs .

Enterprise environmental factors may include:  Government or industry standards  PMIs. organizational structure and culture Infrastructure Personnel administration   .

 STANDARDIZED GUIDELINES WORK INSTRUCTIONS PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLAN TEMPLATES CHANGE CONTROL PROCEDURES     HISTORICAL INFORMATION CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT STANDARDS  .

2 Tools & Techniques ..1 Expert judgment .

 Tailored processes Determine skill levels of required resources   Define configuration management requirements Determine change control process  .

1 Project management plan ..3 Outputs .

control and verify deliverables. expend funds. Whatever it takes to accomplish the objectives Perform activities. staff. create.  . select „sellers‟. train & manage team. report performance and collect & document lessons learned. manage risks.

 Perform activities to accomplish project objectives Create project deliverables      Implement approved changes Initiate corrective action Execute preventive action plans Repair defects .

1 Project management plan .4 Organizational process assets .1 Inputs .3 Enterprise environmental factors ..2 Approved change requests .

2 Tools & Techniques .2 PMIS .1 Expert judgment ..

4 Project management plan updates .3 Change requests .2 Work performance information ..5 Project document updates .3 Outputs .1 Deliverables .

plan. Monitors project processes – Initiating. Planning. analyzing. Executing & Closing Is concerned with – assessing performance vs. tracking & monitoring risks. providing status & forecasts and monitoring approved changes  .

1 Project management plan ..2 Performance reports .1 Inputs .3 Enterprise environmental factors .4 Organizational process assets .

2 Tools & Techniques .1 Expert judgment ..

1 Change requests .2 Project management plan updates ..3 Project document updates .3 Outputs .

Includes the following change management activities based upon the status of the project:  Reviewing and approving requests changes  Maintaining the integrity of baseline  Controlling and updating the scope. schedule and quality requirements based upon approved changes  Ensuring that configuration practices are followed . cost.

.2 Work performance information .5 Organizational process assets .1 Project management plan .4 Enterprise environmental factors .3 Change requests .1 Inputs .

2 Tools & Techniques ..1 Expert judgment .2 Change control meetings .

.3 Project document updates .1 Change request status updates .3 Outputs .2 Project management plan updates .

.3 Organizational process assets .1 Project management plan .2 Accepted deliverables .1 Inputs .

.2 Tools & Techniques .1 Expert judgment .

1 Final product.3 Outputs .2 Organizational process assets updates .. service or result transition .

 Project files Project or phase closure documents Historical information   .

PROJECT SCOPE MANAGEMENT .

 Ensure project includes all required and no extra work for successful completion .

3 Create WBS   5.2 Define scope 5.4 Verify scope 5.   5.5 Control scope .1 Collect requirements 5.

4 Verify scope ◦ -> Accepted deliverables  5. 5.1 Collect requirements ◦ -> Requirement documentation  5.3 Create WBS ◦ -> WBS  5.5 Control scope ◦ -> Work performance measurements .2 Define scope ◦ -> Scope statement  5.

 Product – features and functions of project or service Project – work that must be done to deliver the product or service  .

 This is the process of developing a Requirements Management Plan .

documented and managed throughout the project . Documents how requirements will be analyzed.

2 Stakeholder register ..1 Project charter .1 Inputs .

The stakeholder register is the main output of the Identify Stakeholders process.  Identification information Assessment information Stakeholder classification   .

5 Group decision making techniques .7 Observations ..8 Prototypes .6 Questionnaires and surveys .2 Focus groups .4 Group creativity techniques .3 Facilitated workshops .1 Interviews .2 Tools & Techniques .

 Brainstorming Nominal group techniques   The Delphi techniques Idea/mind mapping Affinity diagrams   .

 Unanimity – everyone agrees Majority – 50% of the group Plurality – largest „block‟ Dictatorship    .

.2 Requirements management plan .3 Outputs .1 Requirements documentation .3 Requirements traceability matrix .

Can include. but is not limited to: ◦ Business problems or opportunities ◦ Business and project objectives for traceability ◦ Functional requirements ◦ Non-functional requirements ◦ Quality requirements ◦ Assumptions and constraints .

Is the process of developing a detailed description of the project and product .

3 Organizational process assets .1 Project charter ..2 Requirements documentation .1 Inputs .

2 Tools & Techniques ..1 Expert judgment .3 Alternatives identification .2 Project analysis .4 Facilitated workshops .

. cross-functional requirements and reconciling stakeholder differences.Are focused sessions that bring key cross-functional stakeholders together to define requirements.

3 Outputs ..2 Project documentation updates .1 Project scope statement .

Describes in detail the project‟s deliverables and the work required to create those deliverables .

The project scope statement includes: ◦ Product scope description ◦ Project deliverables ◦ Project exclusions ◦ Product acceptance criteria ◦ Project constraints ◦ Project assumptions .

to accomplish the project objectives and create the required deliverables. .A deliverable-oriented hierarchical decomposition of the work to be executed by the project team.

LEVEL 1 LEVEL 2 LEVEL 2 LEVEL 3 LEVEL 3 .

 Stakeholder register Requirements documentation   Requirements traceability matrix .

3 Organizational process .2 Requirement documentation .1 Project scope statement .1 Inputs ..

.1 Decomposition WBS Decomposition is the work package level. . and is the point at which the cost and schedule for the work can be reliably estimated.2 Tools & Techniques . is the lowest level in the WBS.

0 project management product management detail design construction integration and test planning software software software software meeting user documentation user documentation user documentation user documentation administration training program materials training program materials training program material training program material .software product release 5.

2 WBS dictionary .4 Project document updates .3 Outputs .3 Scope baseline ..1 WBS .

WBS is the basis for: ◦ Network scheduling ◦ Responsibility matrix ◦ Budget and cost estimating ◦ Risk analysis ◦ Organizational structure ◦ Coordination of objectives ◦ Project performance measures .

 The document generated by the Create WBS process that supports the WBS is called the WBS Dictionary. For each WBS element. the WBS Dictionary includes detailed description of work and technical documentation. May include quality requirements and technical references to facilitate performance of the work   .

1 Inputs .1 Project management plan .Formalizing acceptance of the project deliverables .4 Validated deliverables .2 Requirements documentation .3 Requirements traceability matrix .

3 Project document updates .3 Outputs .2 Tools & Techniques .2 Change requests .1 Accepted deliverables ..1 Inspection .

 Controlling changes to project scope The process of monitoring the status of the project and product scope and managing changes to the scope baseline  .

4 Requirements traceability matrix .1 Project management plan ..1 Inputs .3 Requirements documentation .2 Work performance information .5 Organizational process assets .

3 Outputs .5 Project document plan .2 Organizational process assets updates .1 Work performance measurements .2 Tools & Techniques .4 Project management plan .3 Change requests .1 Variance analysis ..

PROJECT TIME MANAGEMENT .

1 Define Activities 6.6 Control Schedule .3 Estimate Activity Resources 6.2 Sequence Activities 6.4 Estimate Activity Duration 6.Ensuring timely completion of a project 6.5 Develop Schedule 6.

Identifying the activities necessary to produce the project deliverables .

1 Decomposition ..2 Enterprise environmental factors .3 Organizational process assets .2 Rolling wave planning .3 Templates .1 Inputs .4 Expert judgment .1 Scope baseline .2 Tools & Techniques .

 May include availability of PMIS and scheduling software Any and all of the organization‟s enterprise environmental factors and systems that surround and influence the project‟s success must be considered  .

 The existing formal and informal activity planning related policies. Lessons learned from previous related projects.  . procedures. and guidelines that are considered in developing the activity definitions.

more manageable components called Schedule Activities Rolling wave planning: is a form of progressive elaboration where the work to be accomplished in the near term is planned in detail at a low level of the WBS.  As applied to Define Activities Subdividing work packages into smaller. while work in the future is planned for WBS components that are at a relatively high level of the WBS .

use the last „component‟ in the WBS to set up a high-level planning component. Planning Package – below the control account but above a work package  . pending resolution.  Control Account – subsequent work.When you can decompose to the package level. is charged to that control account.

.3 Milestone list .3 Outputs .1 Activity list .2 Activity attributes .

 . A comprehensive list of all schedule activities that are planned to be performed on the project. Includes an identifier and a scope of work in sufficient detail to ensure that project team members understand what work is required to be completed.

Additional information would be  predecessor/successor relationships  Leads and lags  Resource requirements  Imposed dates  Constraints and assumptions.These activity attributes are an extension of the activity attributes in the activity list. etc… .

2 Activity attributes .Identifying and documenting relationships among project activities .4 Project scope statement .5 Organization process assets .1 Inputs .3 Milestone list .1 Activity list .

2 Dependency determination .4 Schedule network templates .2 Tools & Techniques .3 Applying leads and lags .1 Precedence diagramming method (PDM) ..

convenience External – a supplier or contractor   . Mandatory – also called hard logic. requires completion of an activity before Discretionary – also called soft logic or preferred logic.

 A lead allows the acceleration of the successor activity A lag directs a delay in the successor activity  .

.3 Outputs .1 Project schedule network diagrams .2 Project document updates

Determining the „what, when and how many‟ resources will be required. .1 Inputs .1 Activity list .2 Activity attributes .3 Resource calendars .4 Enterprise environmental factors .5 Organizational process assets

Enterprise environmental factors

◦ Uses the infrastructure resource availability information

Organizational process assets

◦ Policies regarding resources plus any relevant historical information

Activity attributes

◦ The attributes developed during the Define Activities process form basis for estimating required resrouces

.2 Tools & Techniques .1 Expert judgment .2 Alternatives analysis

.3 Published estimating data
.4 Bottom-up estimating

.5 Project management software

.3 Outputs .1 Activity resource requirements .2 Resource breakdown structure

.3 Project document updates

The output of the Estimate Activity Resources process is an identification and description of the types and quantities of resources required for each schedule activity in a work package.

.1 INPUTS
.1 Activity list
.2 Activity attributes .3 Activity resource requirements .4 Resource calendars .5 Project scope statement .6 Enterprise environmental factors .7 Organizational process assets.

.4 Three point estimating .3 Parametric estimating .1 Expert judgment .2 Analogous estimating .5 Reserve analysis .2 TOOLS & TECHNIQUES .

Most likely .Pessimistic ◦ Contingency reserves. buffers .  Expert judgment Analogous estimating (also top-down) ◦ Used when detail information is limited ◦ Most reliable when: ◦ Should be used when guided by historical information    Parametric estimating  Previous activities are in fact similar  Individuals making estimates have needed expertise Three point estimates Reserve Analysis ◦ Mathematical algorithms ◦ Optimistic .

3 days 6 Formula: Optimistic + (4*Most Likely) + Pessimistic 6 .   Optimistic time: Pessimistic time: Most likely time: 4 days 8 days 5 days  Expected time. te = 4 + (4 * 5) + 8 = 5.

1. 2. 3. 6. 5. Calculate Te for each activity Determine the critical path (CP) Calculate б of each (CP) activity (Range/6) 1. Range = Pess – Optimistic duration Square б for each (CP) activity to get variance Sum the (CP) variance and take square root Calculate: Z = (Ts – Te)/sq root of variance Look-up % in „Z‟ probability table . 4. 7.

Category Order of Magnitude: (conceptual) Budget Estimate: (semi-detailed) Definitive Estimate: (detailed) Accuracy -15% to +75% -10% to +25% -5% to +10% .

2 Project document updates .3 OUTPUTS ..1 Activity duration estimate .

An iterative process. determines planned start and finish dates for project activities .

7 Project scope statement ..4 Activity resource requirements .3 Project schedule network .6 Activity duration estimates .8 Enterprise environment factors .1 Activity list .5 Resource calendars .2 Activity attributes .1 Inputs .9 Organizational process assets .

 Project scope statement ◦ Contains assumptions and constraints that can impact the development of the project schedule . Organizational process assets ◦ Scheduling methodology…a project calendar of working days or shifts.

.4 Resource leveling .6 applying leads and lags .5 What-if-scenario analysis .2 Tools & Techniques .7 Schedule compression .3 Critical chain method .1 Schedule network analysis .2 Critical path method .8 Scheduling tool .

. Uses early start and finish and late start and finish without regard for any resource limitations…not necessarily the project schedule   Schedule flexibility is determined by „total float‟. A schedule network analysis technique that is performed using the schedule model.

items on the critical path have „zero‟ float! . 3. 2. Complete a network diagram Calculate the critical path Calculate float:  Early start – Latest start Or  Early finish – Latest finish  Remember.1.

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use the largest total .The earliest possible time an activity can begin without interfering with the completion of any preceding activities  Starts with the beginning node of the network diagram (time 0) and continues  If one arrow leads into a node. simple add in series  If more than one arrow leads into a node.

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back through each node. to the first node of the project .The latest time an activity must be started without delaying the end of the project  Calculate project duration  Project duration is the latest finish time of an end node of the project  The calculation of the latest start times involves working form the end node.

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term used in PERT for float . FREE FLOAT – the amount of time an activity can be delayed without delaying the early start of any immediately following activities FLOAT – the amount of time that an activity may be delayed from its early start without delaying the project finish date   SLACK.

there is a risk of rework. CRASHING.  . FAST TRACKING.performing tasks or phases concurrently that you would normally do in sequence.taking action to decrease the total schedule duration after analyzing a number of alternatives to determine how to get the maximum schedule compression for the least cost. However.

The outcome of „what-if‟ scenarios can be used to assess the feasibility of schedule under adverse circumstances (risk factors) Monte Carlo simulations may be used to assess the impact of various circumstances .

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 Any form of network analysis in which scheduling decisions (start & finish) are driven by resource management concerns (resource limitations) Will level work schedules May extend project schedule    Creates smoother distribution of resource usage by shifting tasks within their float allowances .

 Another schedule network analysis that modifies the project schedule to account for limited resources. The critical chain method adds duration buffers that are non-work schedule activities to maintain focus on the planned activity durations  .

.4 Project document updates .3 Schedule data .3 Outputs .2 Schedule baseline .1 Project schedule .

as well as expected duration.Including:  Project schedule network diagrams with activity date information and critical path.  . which show completion of major deliverables and key external interfaces.  Bar charts. which show activity start and end dates. Milestone charts.

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2 Project schedule .1 Project management plan .3 Work performance information ..4 Organizational process assets .1 Inputs .

CPI Activities started. CV. SPI. S-curves. histograms & tables  Earned value: SV.Inputs to Control Schedule may include:  Bar charts. activities finished  .

8 Scheduling tool .4 Resource leveling .3 Project management software .2 Tools & Techniques ..2 Variance analysis .6 Adjusting leads and lags .7 Schedule compression .5 What-If-Scenario analysis .1 Performance reviews .

 Comparing target schedule dates with the actual/forecast start and finish dates May prompt corrective action Examine total float variance   .

2 Organizational process assets updates .3 Outputs .1 Work performance measurements .4 Project management plan updates .5 Project document updates ..3 Change requests .

The calculated SV and SPI values for WBS components. . in particular the work packages and control accounts. are documented and communicated to stakeholders.

.Includes but are not limited to:   Causes of variances Corrective action chosen and the reason  Other types of lessons learned from project schedule control.

Baseline change only in response to approved schedule changes .

PROJECT COST MANAGEMENT .

estimating. . criteria for planning. integrate and coordinate subsidiary plans into a project management plan. budgeting and controlling project costs. prepare.2)…documenting the actions necessary to define.Ensuring completion within the approved budget Preceding cost management processes: ◦ Part of develop project management plan (4. structuring. ◦ Sets out format.

3 Control Costs .1 Estimate Cost 7. 7.2 Determine Budget   7.

 Estimating cost of required resources .

1 .6 Scope Baseline Project Schedule Human Resource Plan Risk Register Enterprise Environment Factors Organizational Process assets .2 .3 .1 Inputs .4 ..5 .

 Scope statement Work breakdown structure   WBS dictionary .

 Cost estimating policies        Cost estimating templates Historical information Project files Project team knowledge Lessons learned Resource cost rates Basic assumptions .

6 Reserve analysis .1 Expert judgment .3 Parametric modeling .5 Three point estimate .2 Analogous estimating .4 Bottom-up estimating .9 Vendor bid analysis .8 Project management estimating software .7 Cost of quality ..2 Tools & Techniques .

less accurate.uses statistical relationship based on historical analysis Bottom-up estimating.also called top-down. Parametric modeling.detail build-up Vendor bid analysis – assets costs / component/ bid Reserve analysis – assets combine contingencies Cost of quality – all costs to secure specification conformance .      Analogous estimating. based on „similar‟ activities. less costly.

2 Basis of estimates .3 Project document updates ..3 Outputs .1 Activity cost estimates .

such as: ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ Labor Material Equipment Services Facilities Information technology Special categories.Costs are estimated for all resources. such as an inflation allowance or cost contingency reserve .

Aggregating the individual costs to establish an authorized cost baseline. Scope Baseline  Scope statement  work breakdown structure  WBS dictionary .

1 Inputs .3 ..7 Activity Cost Estimates Basis of Estimate Scope baseline Project Schedule Resource Calendars Contracts Organizational Process Assets .6 .1 .4 .5 .2 .

1 .2 .2 Tools & Techniques .4 .3 ..5 Cost aggregation Reserve analysis Expert judgment Historical relationships Funding limit reconciliation .

.3 Project document updates .3 Outputs .1 Cost performance baseline .2 Project funding requirements .

Developed by summing estimated costs by period and is usually displayed in the form of an S-curve. and control overall cost performance on the project. (see page 178 of Becker-module 5)   . monitor. The cost performance baseline is a timephase budget that is used as a basis against which to measure.

. The process of monitoring the status of the project to update the project budget and manage changes to the cost baseline.

3 .4 Project management plan Project funding requirements Work performance information Organizational process assets .2 ..1 Inputs .1 .

 Cost control includes: ◦ Monitoring cost performance to detect and understand variances from the cost baseline ◦ Recording all appropriate changes to the baseline ◦ Informing appropriate stakeholders of approved changes  Cost control searches out the causes of variance and is part of Perform Integrated Change Control .

 Deliverables completed and pending Costs authorized and incurred   Estimates to complete the scheduled activities .

 Project cost control searches out the causes of variances and is part of Performance Integrated Change Control .

1 ..2 Tools & Techniques .6 Earned value measurement Forecasting To-Complete performance index (TCPI) Performance reviews Variance analysis Project management software .4 .5 .2 .3 .

PV = the budgeted cost for the work scheduled to be completed on an activity EV = the budgeted amount for the work actually completed on the scheduled activity AC = the actual cost incurred in performing the work for the scheduled activity .

 Variances: ◦ Cost ◦ Schedule CV = EV – AC SV = EV – PV  Performance Index: ◦ Cost ◦ Schedule CPI = EV / AC SPI = EV / PV .

 Budget At Completion = BAC Estimate To complete = ETC   Estimate at Completion = EAC Calculation of ETC and EAC will vary based on current situation .

 ETC with an atypical current variance: ◦ ETC = BAC – EV  ETC with typical current variance: ◦ ETC = (BAC –EV) / CPI  ETC with residual budget not accurate: ◦ ETC will require a NEW estimate! .

  EAC = Estimate at Completion Residual budget is accurate: ◦ EAC = AC + (BAC – EV)  Budget variance will continue (use CPI): ◦ EAC = AC + (BAC – EV) / CPI or ◦ EAC = AC + (BAC – EV) / (CPI x SPI)  Using a new estimate: ◦ EAC = AC + ETC .

 EAC is sometimes stated: ◦ EAC = AC + (BAC – EV) / CPI or ◦ EAC = AC + (BAC – EV) / (CPI x SPI) .

 Based on BAC ◦ TCPI = (BAC – EV) / (BAC – AC)  BASED ON EAC ◦ TCPI = (BAC – EV) / (EAC – AC) .

3 Outputs ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ .1 . .4 .6 Work performance measurements Budget forecasts Organizational process assets updates Change requests Project management plan updates Project document updates .5 .2 .3 .

PROJECT QUALITY MANAGEMENT .

Ensuring the project will satisfy the needs for which it was undertaken Quality must be planned in…. NOT inspected in .

2 Perform Quality Assurance 8.8.1 Plan Quality 8.3 Perform Quality Control .

evaluating. defining and managing expectations so that customer requirements are met Requires conformance to requirements and fitness for use   . Quality NOT the same as grade Customer satisfaction – Understanding.

Identifying relevant quality standards and determining how to satisfy them .

.1 Inputs
.1 .2 .3 .4 .5 .6 .7 Scope baseline Stakeholder register Cost performance baseline Schedule baseline Risk register Enterprise Environmental Factors Organizational process assets

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Scope Baseline – the scope statement, WBS, WBS dictionary Stakeholder Register – Stakeholders concerned with quality Cost Performance Baseline – Time phases to measure cost performance Schedule Baseline – Schedule performance start/finish dates Risk Register – Threats & opportunities Enterprise Environmental Factors – Regulations, rules, standards Organizational Process Assets – Policies, procedures, guidelines, historical databases, lessons learned.

The overall intentions and direction of an organization with regard to quality, as formally expressed by top management. PMBOK / ISO

.2 Tools & Techniques
.1 .2 .3 .4 .5 .6 .7 .8 .9 Cost-benefits analysis Cost of quality Control charts Benchmarking Design of experiments Statistical sampling Flowcharting Proprietary quality management methodologies Additional quality planning tools

Quality planning must consider cost-benefits tradeoffs Quality planning results in:
Less rework Higher productivity Lower costs Increased stakeholder satisfaction

Techniques of analyzing variables Alter one, stabilize others

Jr. vs. Sr. Engineering Smother ride – tires vs. suspension

Benchmarking is comparing practices to generate ideas for improvement Cost of quality is the total price of all efforts to achieve project or service quality  This includes all work to build a product/service that conforms to the requirements as well as all work resulting from nonconformance to the requirements

.1 Quality management plan .4 Process improvement plan .5 Project document updates .3 Quality checklists .2 Quality metrics .3 Outputs .

. and continuous process improvement.The Quality Management Plan provides input to the overall Project Management plan and must address quality control (QC). quality assurance (QA).

& owner Process configuration – a flowchart Process metrics Targets for improved performance    . their I/O‟s. if any. and end of processes. start. Process boundaries – describes the purpose. data required.

Quality assurance is the process of auditing the quality requirements and the results from quality control measurements to ensure appropriate quality standards and operational definitions are used. .

1 Inputs ..4 Quality control measurements .1 Project management plan .2 Quality metrics .3 work performance information .

2 Quality audits .1 Plan quality and Perform quality control tools and techniques .2 Tools & Techniques .3 Process analysis ..

3 Outputs .2 change requests .3 Project management plan updates .4 Project document updates ..1 Organizational process assets updates .

.Updated quality standards provide validation of the effectiveness and efficiency of the performing organization‟s quality standards and processes to meet requirements.

Monitoring specific project results to determine whether they comply with relevant quality standards and indentifying ways to eliminate causes of unsatisfactory performance .

5 Approved change requests .6 Deliverables .7 Organizational process assets .1 Project management plan .1 Inputs .3 Quality checklists .2 Quality metrics .4 Work performance measurements ..

4 .2 .9 .3 .5 .10 Cause and Effect diagrams Control charts Flowcharting Histogram Pareto chart Run chart Scatter diagram Statistical sampling Inspection Approved change requests review .1 .6 ..7 .8 .2 Tools & Techniques .

.

.

 Other tools & techniques ◦ Histogram – a bar chart showing a distribution of variables ◦ Run chart – shows the history and pattern of variance – trend analysis may show:  Technical performance  Cost and schedule performance ◦ Scatter diagram – shows the pattern of relationship between two variables ◦ Statistical sampling – chooses part of a „population‟ for inspection .

4 Organization process assets updates .6 Project management plan .3 Outputs .1 Quality control measurements .2 Validated changes .3 Validated deliverables ..7 Project updates .5 Change requests .

◦ Q.A. Quality control ◦ Q. Quality assurance vs. – An „inspection‟ process that uses tools!! Deming – objective: focus on „process‟ and eventually do away with inspection .C. – A „managerial‟ review/audit of the process.

 Control charts ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ UCL / LCL Standard deviation/variance Rule of 7 Assignable cause  JIT (just-in-time) ◦ Requires 100% quality .

QC QCC – Quality Control Circles “harnessing the energy. Control chart irregularities ◦ Special cause-assignable (worker-related 15%) ◦ Common (management control 85%)  QA vs. ingenuity and enthusiasm of the work force”  .

 Responsibility for project quality: ◦ Project Manager – Ultimate ◦ “Doer” – Primary  Deming – Objective: focus on process. do away with inspection .

 QFD – Quality Function Deployment A more elaborate extension of CWQC. The voice of the customer is deployed throughout the company . Incorporates „perceptions of quality‟ into products.

Taguchi = Marginal Analysis – optimal quality is reached when incremental revenue from improvement equals the incremental cost to secure it  . Kaizen = Continuous improvement on and incremental basis.

0040 .16 .0280 .0020 .0768 .0060 .0560 .Category Prevention Appraisal Internal External Total % of Sales Dollars Reactive Proactive .04 .0160 .0112 .

PROJECT Human Resource MANAGEMENT .

Ensuring effective use of project personnel .

3 Develop project team 9.1 Develop human resource plan 9.4 Manage project team  .2 Acquire project team   9. 9.

responsibilities and reporting relationships and creates the “Staffing Management Plan.” .Determine project roles.

1 Inputs .1.9.2 Enterprise environmental factors .3 Organizational process assets .1 Activity resource requirements .

 Organizational culture and structure. existing human resources Personnel administration policies Marketplace conditions   .

1 Organizational charts and position descriptions .2 Networking .3 Organizational theory .2 Tools & Techniques .9.1.

.

1.3 Outputs .1 Human resource plan Roles and Responsibilities Project organization charts Staffing management plan .9.

 Role – area of accountability Authority – level of decision making   Responsibility – expected work Competency – skill and capacity  .

Staff acquisition – source & location Timetable – when. when Compliance Safety . how long Release criteria – method and timing Training needs Recognition and rewards – criteria.

Obtaining the human resources needed to complete the project .

1 Inputs .9.2 Enterprise environmental factors .1 Project management plan .3 Organizational process assets .2.

 Availability – who & when        Ability – what competencies Experience – similar or related work Interests – desire to be on project Cost – how much Personnel administration policies Organizational structure Location .

2 Tools & Techniques .9.4 Virtual teams .2 Negotiation – Functional managers or other teams .3 Acquisition – outside sources .2.1 Pre-assignment – RFP or charter .

2.1 Project staff assignments .2 Resource calendars .3 Project management plan updates .3 Outputs .9.

 Improve skills of team members Improve feelings of trust and cohesiveness   Create a dynamic. cross training and mentoring . cohesive team culture to build team spirit and cooperation.

1 Project staff assignments .3 Resource calendars .2 Project management plan .1 Inputs .3.9.

4 Ground rules .2 Training .5 Co-location .9.6 Recognition and Rewards .1 Interpersonal skills .3 Team-building activities .2 Tools & Techniques .3.

 Forming Storming   Norming Performing Adjourning   .

 Performance improvements ◦ Individual skills ◦ Team behavior  Improvements = increased productivity .

3.2 enterprise environmental factors updates .3 Outputs .9.1 Team performance assessments Improved skills = + effective Competencies and sentiments Reduced turnover rate .

resolve issues and coordinate changes Difficult in a matrix environment  . provide feedback. Track team member performance.

9.5 Organizational process assets .1 Inputs .2 Project management plan .4 Performance reports .4.1 Project staff assignments .3 Team performance assessments .

9.2 Tools & Techniques .5 Interpersonal skills .2 Project performance appraisals .1 Observation and conversation .4.4 Issue log .3 Conflict management .

 Schedule (most common issue) Priorities Resources Technical options Procedures Personalities      .

Project Activity Schedule Priorities Inception 3 1 Planning 2 1 Implement 1 4 Terminate 1 4 Resources Technical approach Procedures Cost Personalities 4 6 2 5 7 5 4 3 7 6 3 2 5* 5* 5* 2* 6 7 5 2* *Tied in ranking: Low score indicates principal cause of conflict .

      1 Withdrawal 1 Smoothing 1 Compromising 2 Forcing 2 Collaborating 2 Problem Solving 2 or “Confronting” Temporary – no resolution Provides resolution 2 2 .

no ambiguity or overlap ◦ Interesting & challenging . Inform team of: ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ Exactly where project is headed “SMART” goals & objectives All key decisions All changes  Assigns tasks: ◦ Clearly.

 Complex problems – the team (group) usually develops a better quality solution than an individual. but may take longer He who experiences a problem “must” solve the problem ◦ An example follows on the next slide  .

◦ Who solves the problem? ◦ Who should assists? . Two project members are having a “problem” ◦ Who solves the problem? ◦ Who should assist?  The project schedule is unrealistic.

 Legitimate Coercive – – Position Fear   Reward Expert Referent - + Knowledge Status   .

not positions   Insist on using objective criteria . Separate people from problem Focus on interests.

people can be self-directed. creative and seek responsibility. Theory X managers assume: ◦ People dislike work. motivation occurs at all “levels” . must be controlled and directed  Theory Y manager assume: ◦ Work is natural if conditions are favorable.

shelter Fear of losing #1 or physical danger Accepted Prestige. Self-actualization Food. Social 4. Safety 3. Esteem 5.1. power Competence achievement . Physiological 2.

 Working conditions Salary Personal life Relationships at work Security Status      .

 Responsibility Self-actualization   Professional growth Recognition  .

2 Organizational process assets updates .3 Outputs .4.1 Enterprise environmental factors updates .9.3 change requests .4 Project management plan updates .

but can destroy motivation Motivation agents – work itself in a positive. per se. constructive environment  . Hygiene factors – not motivators.

to be saved as templates ◦ Ground rules.. Input to organizational performance appraisals Lessons-learned documentation: ◦ Organizational charts. etc. co-location ◦ Special skills “uncovered” ◦ Documented issues and solutions  . conflict management techniques and recognition events ◦ Procedures for virtual teams.

PROJECT COMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT .

collection.Ensuring timely and appropriate generation. dissemination. storage and ultimate disposition of project information .

3 Distribute Information 10. 10.2 Plan Communications   10.1 Identify Stakeholders 10.4 Manage Stakeholders Expectations 10.5 Report Performance   .

know their interests and expectations from the project and plan accordingly  . The success of any project is based upon identifying all project stakeholders Then.

.2 Procurement Documents .1 Project Charter .4 Organizational Process Assets .3 Enterprise Environmental Factors .1 Inputs .

.2 Expert Judgment .1 Stakeholder Analysis .2 Tools & Techniques .

1 Stakeholder Register .3 Outputs .2 Stakeholder Management Strategy ..

   Sender – receiver models Choice of media Writing style   Presentation techniques Meeting management techniques .

Determining information needs:   Who? What?   When? How? .

.1 Inputs
.1 Stakeholder Register .2 Stakeholder Management Strategy .3 Enterprise Environmental Factors .4 Organizational Process Assets

.2 Tools & Techniques
.1 Communication Requirements Analysis .2 Communication Technology .3 Communication Models .4 Communication Methods

Number of communication paths: n(n-1)/2 For example, consider 8 people in a meeting = 8(8-1)/2 = 8(7)/2 = 56/2 = 28 paths Adding two more to the team gives you how many more paths of communication? New path = 10(10-1)/2 = 90/2 = 45 #ofNewPaths - #ofOldPaths 45 – 28 = gives you 17 more paths

 

  

Organizational charts Organization/stakeholder responsibility relationships Disciplines/specialties involved Logistics number of people and locations Internal information needs (across organizations) External information needs (contractors, media) Stakeholder information

Sender Encoder

Medium

Receiver Decoder

 Noise ->
Feedback

Interactive communication-between 2 or more parties performing a multidirectional exchange; most efficient way to ensure common understanding by all participants. Push communication-sent to specific recipients; ensures information is distributed but does not certify it actually reached or was understood by intended audience. Pull communication-used for very large volumes of information; requires recipients to access the communication content at their own discretion.

.3 Outputs
.1 Communication Management Plan .2 Project Document Updates

Making needed information available to project stakeholders on a timely basis .

 Sender-receiver models – feedback loops and barriers to communications  Choice of media – situation specifics of when to communicate in writing versus orally. and when to communicate fact-to-face versus by e-mail Writing style – active versus passive voice. sentence structure. when to write an informal memo versus a formal report. or work choice Meeting management techniques – preparing an agenda and dealing with conflicts Presentation techniques – body language and design of visual aids Facilitation techniques – building consensus and overcoming obstacles     .

.2 Performance Reports .3 Organizational Process Assets .1 Inputs .1 Project Management Plan .

2 Tools & Techniques ..1 Communication Methods .2 Information Distribution Tools .

3 Outputs ..1 Organizational Process Assets  Stakeholder notifications  Project reports  Project presentations  Project records  Feedback from stakeholders  Lessons learned documentation .

.1 Stakeholder Register .5 Change Log .1 Inputs .2 Stakeholder Management Strategy .4 Issue Log .3 Project Management Plan .6 Organizational Process Assets .

resolving conflict.2 Interpersonal Skills .building trust. active listening.1 Communication Methods .3 Management Skills – presentation skills. and overcoming resistance to change . negotiating. and public speaking . writing skills..2 Tools & Techniques .

 Verbal impact 10-40% of message  Non-verbal impact 60-90% of message  Symbolic Tactile Appearance “Touch”  .

briefings) and informal (memos. the public) Formal (reports. ad hoc conversations) Vertical (up and down the organization) and horizontal (with peers)    . Written and oral. the media. listening and speaking Internal (within the project) and external (customer.

3 Outputs .3 Project Management Plan Updates .1 Organizational Process Assets Updates .2 Change Requests .4 Project Document Updates ..

   Stakeholder notifications Project reports Project presentations    Project records Feedback form stakeholders Lessons learned documents .

address their concerns. and resolve their issues! .The process of working with stakeholders to meet their needs.

The process of collecting and distributing performance information. such as: ◦ Status reports ◦ Progress measurements ◦ Forecasts .

5 Organizational Process Assets .3 Work Performance Measurements .4 Budget Forecasts ..1 Project Management Plan .1 Inputs .2 Work Performance Information .

2 Forecasting Methods .4 Reporting Systems .1 Variance Analysis ..2 Tools & Techniques .3 Communication Methods .

Common steps are:  Verify quality of information collected to ensure it is complete.).   .e. quality performance adjustments and scope changes. comparing actual with project baseline and noting all differences both favorable and unfavorable to project outcomes. etc. Determine the impact of variances in project cost and schedule as well as other areas of the project (i..Variance analysis is an after-the-fact look at what caused a difference between baseline and actual performance. Determine variances. and credible when comparing with other project or status information. consistent with past data.

and probability estimates (composite forecasts. and ensemble forecasting   . probabilistic forecasting. Time series methods – uses historical data as the basis for estimating outcomes. and forecast by analogy) Other methods – include simulation. Earned value Moving average Extrapolation Linear prediction Trend estimation Growth curve  Causal/econometric methods – use assumptions to identify underlying factors that might influence variable being forecasted Judgmental methods – incorporate intuitive judgments. surveys. opinions. technology forecasting. scenario building. Delphi method.

3 Outputs ..3 Change Requests .1 Performance Reports .2 Organizational Process Assets Updates .

PROJECT RISK MANAGEMENT .

Identifying. and decrease the probability and impact of negative events in the project. . Objectives of Project Risk Management are to increase the probability and impact of positive events. analyzing and responding to project risk.

11.6 Monitor & Control Risks .1 Plan Risk Management 11.2 Identify Risks 11.5 Plan Risk Responses 11.4 Perform Quantitative Risk Analysis 11.3 Perform Qualitative Risk Analysis 11.

To be successful. . the organization should be committed to addressing the management of risk proactively and consistently throughout the project.

Plan Risk Management is the process of deciding how to conduct risk management activities for a project. .

3 Schedule Management Plan .4 Communications Management Plan .1 Inputs .6 Organizational Process Assets .1 Project Scope Statement ..2 Cost Management Plan .5 Enterprise Environmental Factors .

The attitudes toward risk and the risk tolerance of organizations and people involved in the project will influence the Project Management Plan. .

Organizations may have predefined approaches to risk management. common definitions of concepts and terms. . standard templates. roles and responsibilities and authority levels for decision-making. such as:      risk categories.

1 Planning Meetings and Analysis ..2 Tools & Techniques .

3 Outputs ..1 Risk Management Plan .

The risk management plan describes the following: ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ Structure and performance Methodology Roles & responsibilities Budgeting Timing Risk categories Definitions of risk probability and impact Probability and impact matrix Revised stakeholders‟ tolerances Reporting formats Tracking .

.Determining and documenting risks likely to affect the project.

3 Activity Duration Estimates ..1 Risk Management Plan .2 Activity Cost Estimates .5 Stakeholder Register .1 Inputs .4 Scope Baseline .

6 Cost Management Plan .8 Quality Management Plan .10 Enterprise Environmental Factors .11 Organizational Process Assets .1 Inputs (continued) .9 Project Documents ..7 Schedule Management Plan .

performance reports    Earned value . cost/time/quality estimates Project assumptions vs. Cause-and-effect diagrams Management plans vs.

benchmarking. may also be useful in identifying risks. .Published information. academic studies. or other industry studies. including commercial databases.

5 Diagramming Techniques .7 Expert Judgment .6 SWOT Analysis .4 Assumptions Analysis .1 documentation Reviews ..2 Information Gathering techniques .3 Checklist Analysis .2 Tools & Techniques .

opportunities.     Brainstorming Delphi technique Interviewing Root cause identification Strengths. weaknesses. and threats analysis (SWOT) .

Risk identification checklists can be developed based on historical information and knowledge that has been accumulated from previous similar projects and from other sources of information .

 Cause-and-effect diagrams ◦ Also known as fishbone or Ishikawa diagrams  System of process flowcharts Influence diagrams  .

Materials Work Methods Defect Equipment Measurements .

.

.1 Risk Register  List of identified risks  List of potential responses .3 Outputs .

Qualitative Risk Analysis includes methods for prioritizing the identified risks for further action. such as Quantitative Risk Analysis or Risk Response planning. .

4 Organizational Process Assets .1 Risk Register ..1 Inputs .3 Project Scope Management .2 Risk Management Plan .

.Data about risks on past projects and the lessons learned knowledge base can be used in the Qualitative Risk Analysis process.

5 Risk Urgency Assessment .1 Risk Probability and Impact Assessment .2 Probability and Impact Matrix .4 Risk Categorization .6 Expert Judgment ..2 Tools & Techniques .3 Risk Data Quality Assessment .

.1 Risk Register Updates  Relative Ranking or Priority List  Risks Grouped by Categories  Causes of risk or project areas requiring particular attention  List of Risks Requiring Response in the Near Term  List of Risks for Additional Analysis & Response  Watch lists of Low Priority Risks  Trends in Qualitative Risk Analysis Results .3 Outputs .

.A Quantitative Risk Analysis is generally performed on risks that have been prioritized by the Qualitative Risk Analysis process as potentially and substantially impacting the project‟s competing demands.

5 Organizational Process Assets .2 Risk Management Plan .1 Inputs .4 Schedule Management Plan .1 Risk Register ..3 Cost Management Plan .

but sometimes is performed directly after Risk Identification.Quantitative Risk Analysis generally follows the Qualitative Risk Analysis process. . Quantitative Risk Analysis should be repeated after Risk Response Planning and Risk Monitoring and Control.

1 Data Gathering and Representation Techniques .2 Quantitative Risk Analysis and Modeling Techniques .3 Expert Judgment ..2 Tools & Techniques .

 Interviewing – quantify the probability and impact of risks on project  Probability distribution – Evaluate range of estimates  Expert judgment – Internal or external SMEs .

EMV Decision tree analysis Modeling and simulation – Monte Carlo   . Sensitivity analysis .Examines the extent of uncertainty of each project element – other elements held constant  Expected monetary value .

The sum of each probability of occurrence times the dollar value of the occurrence .

.

.

.

.3 Outputs .1 Risk Register Updates  Probabilistic analysis of the Project  Probability of Achieving Cost and Time Objectives  Prioritized List of Quantified Risks  Trends in Quantified Risk Analysis Results .

Developing options and determining actions to enhance opportunities and to reduce threats. .

1 Inputs ..1 Risk Register .2 Risk Management Plan .

3 Contingent Response Strategies .4 Expert Judgment .2 Tools & Techniques .1 Strategies for Negative Risks or Threats ..2 Strategies for Positive risks or Opportunities .

Important inputs are: priority lists. trends. near term risks.  . risks for additional analysis and response. risks grouped by category. It is updated during the qualitative and quantitative processes. root causes. The risk register is first developed in the Identify Risks process.

 Avoid Transfer   Mitigate (reduce odds or impact) Accept (active or passive)  .

 Exploit Share   Enhance (increase odds or impact) Accept  .

1 Risk Register Updates ..3 Outputs .2 Risk-related Contract Decisions .3 Project Management Plan Updates .4 Project Document Updates .

tracking & reanalyzing risks and reviewing the execution of risk response plans while evaluating their effectiveness. .The process of implementing risk response plans.

2 Project Management Plan ..1 Risk Register .4 Performance Reports .3 Work Performance Information .1 Inputs .

1 Risk Reassessment ..4 Technical Performance Measurement .3 Variance and Trend Analysis .2 Tools & Techniques .2 Risk audits .6 Status Meetings .5 Reserve Analysis .

5 Project Document Updates ..2 Organizational Process Assets Updates .3 Outputs .3 Change Requests .1 Risk Register Updates .4 Project Management Plan Updates .

and periodic risk reviews. including updates to probability. Outcomes of risk reassessments. priority. risk audits. impact. response plans  Risks that are no longer applicable may be closed The actual outcomes of the project‟s risks and of risk responses are documented for use on future projects  .

checklists and the RBSs . Requested changes ◦ To integrated change control and response plans  Recommended corrective actions and control work processes ◦ To direct and manage project execution & monitor  Organizational process assets ◦ Document final versions of the risk register. risk templates.

PROJECT PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT .

.Acquiring goods and services from outside the performing organization.

2 Conduct Procurements 12.12.1 Plan Procurements 12.3 Administer Procurements 12.4 Close Procurements .

1 Inputs .4 Risk Register .5 Risk-Related Contract Decisions .2 Requirements Documentation .Determining what to procure and form whom .3 Teaming Agreements .1 Scope Baseline .

6 Activity Resource Requirements ..6 Project Schedule .9 Cost Performance Baseline .10 Enterprise Environmental Factors .1 Inputs .11 Organizational Process Assets .8 Activity Cost Estimates .

. and results are available in the marketplace. services.Enterprise environmental factors include the conditions of the marketplace and what products. from whom and under what terms and conditions.

guidelines and management systems… in the procurement management plan and selecting the contract types. procedures. .Organizational process assets are the existing formal and informal procurement-related policies.

.1 Make-or-Buy Analysis .3 Contract Types .2 Expert Judgment .2 Tools & Techniques .

 Fixed-Price Contracts ◦ Firm fixed price (FFP) ◦ Fixed price incentive fee (FPIF) ◦ Fixed price with economic price adjustments (FPEPA)  Cost-Reimbursable Contract ◦ Cost-plus-fixed-fee (CPFF) ◦ Cost-plus-incentive-fee (CPIF) ◦ Cost-plus-award-fee (CPAF)  Time & Material (T&M) .

3 Make-or-Buy Decisions .5 Source Selection Criteria .2 Procurement Statements of Work .1 Procurement Management Plan ..6 Change Requests .4 Procurement Documents .3 Outputs .

 SOW description in sufficient detail SOW is written to be clear. complete and concise SOW can be revised and refined as required until incorporated into a signed contract   .

selecting a seller.Conduct procurements is the process of obtaining seller responses. . and awarding a contract.

7 Make-or-Buy Decisions .6 Project Documents .3 Source Selection Criteria .1 Inputs .9 Organizational Process Assets .4 Qualified Seller List .1 Project Management Plan .5 Seller Proposals ..8 Teaming Agreements .2 Procurement Documentations .

1 Bidder conferences ..2 Proposal Evaluation Techniques .6 Internet Search .7 Procurement Negotiations .3 Independent Estimates .5 Advertising .2 Tools & Techniques .4 Expert Judgment .

2 Procurement Contract Award .4 Change Requests .5 Project Management Plan .3 Outputs ..1 Select Sellers .3 Resource Calendars .6 Project Documents Updates .

The process of managing procurement relationships. . monitoring contract performance. and making changes and corrections as needed.

6 Work Performance Information ..4 Performance Reports .1 Procurement Documents .2 Project Management Plan .5 Approved Change Requests .1 Inputs .3 Contract .

5 Payment Systems ◦ .1 Contract Change Control System ◦ .3 Inspections and Audits ◦ .4 Performance Reporting ◦ .2 Procurement Performance Reviews ◦ .7 Records Management System . .2 Tools & Techniques ◦ .6 Claims Administration ◦ .

3 change Requests .4 Project Management Plan Updates .2 Organizational Process Assets Updates .1 Procurement Documents .3 Outputs ..

The process of completing each project procurement .

1 Inputs .1 Project Management Plan ..2 Procurement Document .

3 Records Management System .2 Tools & Techniques ..2 Negotiated Settlements .1 Procurement Audits .

.1 Closed Procurements .3 Outputs .2 Organizational Process Assets Updates  Procurement File  Deliverable Acceptance  Lessons Learned Documentation .

PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY .

Chapter 1 Vision & Applicability Chapter 2 Responsibility Chapter 3 Respect Chapter 4 Fairness Chapter 5 Honesty .

respect.3 Structure of the Code Aligned with critical values 1.1.1 Vision & Purpose Practitioners do what is right and honorable 1.4 Values that Support the Code Responsibility.2 Person to Whom the code Applies PMI members and non-member PMPs 1. fairness and honesty .

1.5 Aspirational and Mandatory Conduct
◦ Aspirational – the conduct that we strive to uphold as practitioners

◦ Mandatory – establish firm requirements, and in some cases, limit or prohibit practitioner

2.1 Description of Responsibility
◦ Our duty to take ownership for our decisions and actions and accept the consequences that result.

2.2 Responsibility: Aspirational Standards
◦ Decisions & actions based upon best interest of society, public safety and the environment.
◦ Accept only assignments consistent with our background, experience, skills and qualifications.

2.3 Mandatory Standards
◦ Uphold the policies, rules, regulations and laws that govern our work.
◦ Report unethical or illegal conduct to appropriate management and, if necessary, to those affected by the conduct.

3.1 Description of Respect

◦ Regard for ourselves and others, as well as entrusted resources.

3.2 Respect: Aspirational Standards
◦ Inform ourselves about norms and customs of others.

◦ Listen to other points of view.
◦ Approach directly those with whom we have a conflict or a disagreement.

◦ Conduct ourselves professionally, even if it is not
returned.

3.3 Mandatory Standards
◦ Negotiate in good faith ◦ Do not benefit at the expense of others. ◦ Do not act in an abusive manner. ◦ Respect the property rights of others.

4.1 Description of Fairness
◦ Objective and impartial decisions

4.2 Fairness: Aspirational Standards
◦ Transparency in decisions. ◦ Continually re-examine impartiality and objectivity. ◦ Equal access to information.

◦ Equal opportunity to qualified candidates.

4.3 Fairness: Mandatory Standards
◦ Disclose any real or potential conflicts of interest.
◦ Refrain from decision-making where a conflict of interest exists, unless previously disclosed and continued participations is requested.

5.1 Description of Honesty ◦ In our communications and conduct. 5. ◦ Provide accurate information in a timely fashion. ◦ Commitments and promises made in good faith.2 Honesty: Aspirational Standards ◦ Seek and communicate the truth. . ◦ Create an environment in which others are safe to tell the truth.

false or misleading statements.3 Honesty: Mandatory Standards ◦ Do not make or condone deceptive behavior. information that is out of context or incomplete. ◦ Do not engage in dishonest behavior for personal gain or at the expense of others. 5. . half truths.

 Conflicts of Interest Abusive Manner   Loyalty .

16 Questions 1.4 Components. . in order to protect the community and all stakeholders and to create a healthy working environment. ethical standards and social norms. Ensure personal integrity and professionalism by adhering to legal requirements.

Enhance personal professional competence by increasing and applying knowledge.3. in order to improve project management services. .

. in order to ensure a collaborative project management environment. Promote interaction among team members and other stakeholders in a professional and cooperative manner by respecting personal and cultural differences.4.

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