You are on page 1of 10

APOLLO 11

Alyazia Alsuwaidi
For your
information…
Launched: 16 July 1969 UT 13:32:00 (09:32:00 a.m. EDT)

Landed on Moon: 20 July 1969 UT 20:17:40 (04:17:40 p.m. EDT)

Landing Site: Mare Tranquillitatis - Sea of Tranquility (0.67 N, 23.47 E)

Returned to Earth: 24 July 1969 UT 16:50:35 (12:50:35 p.m. EDT)
Expanding Our Knowledge of the
Solar System
Apollo
: Expanding Our Knowledge of the
Solar
On System
May 25, 1961, President John F. Kennedy
announced the goal of sending astronauts to the
moon before the end of the decade. Coming just
three weeks after Mercury astronaut Alan Sheppard
became the first American in space, Kennedy's bold
challenge set the nation on a journey unlike any
before in human history.
Eight years of hard work by thousands of Americans
came to fruition on July 20, 1969, when Apollo 11
commander Neil Armstrong stepped out of the lunar
module and took "one small step" in the Sea of
Tranquility, calling it "a giant leap for mankind."
Apollo 11 crew

Apollo 11 crew
Neil Armstrong Mission Commander
Michael Collins Command Module Pilot
Apollo 11 mission
The purpose of the Apollo 11
mission was to land men on the
lunar surface and to return them
safely to Earth. The crew was Ne
A. Armstrong, commander;
Michael Collins, Command
Module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin
Jr., Lunar Module pilot.
After launch, the spacecraft was inserted
into lunar orbit about 76 hours into the
mission. After a rest period, Armstrong
and Aldrin entered the Lunar Module
preparing for descent to the lunar
surface. The two spacecraft were
undocked at about 100 hours, when
the Command and Service Modules
separated from the Lunar Module. The
spacecraft landed in the Sea of
Tranquillity at 4:18 p.m. EDT.
Afterwards, they ate their first meal on
the Moon and decided to begin the
A Lunar Module camera provided
live television coverage of
Armstrong setting foot on the
lunar surface at 10:56 p.m. EDT.
Just as he stepped off the Lunar
Module Neil Armstrong
proclaimed, "That's one small
step for a man, one giant leap for
mankind." Aldrin emerged soon
after, setting foot on the lunar
surface at 11:16 p.m. EDT.
Aldrin evaluated his ability to
operate and move about and
was able to move about rapidly
and with confidence. Forty-
seven pounds of lunar surface
material were collected to be
returned for analysis. The
surface exploration was
concluded in 2½ hours, when
the crew re-entered the lunar
module.
After lunar ascent, the Lunar Module
docked with the Command and Servic
Modules at 128 hours. The crew
transferred into the Command and
Service Modules, the ascent stage wa
jettisoned and they prepared for trans
Earth injection. Only one midcourse
correction was required, and passive
thermal control was used for most of
trans-Earth coast. Bad weather made
necessary to move the splashdown
point 346 kilometers (215 miles)
downrange.
Atmospheric entry phase was
normal, and the command module
landed in the Pacific Ocean at
195¼ hours. The landing
coordinates, as determined from
the onboard computer, were 13
degrees 30 minutes north latitude
and -169 degrees 15 minutes east
longitude.With the success of
Apollo 11, the national objective to
land men on the Moon and return
them safely to Earth had been
accomplished.