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Security Systems LoB Communication

7.2.2003

Slide 1

Security Systems LoB Communication

Integrus Technical Training


Introduction Benefits & Features Product Overview Benchmarking & Competition

System Technology
System Design & Set up
I&O Manual
Slide 2

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Why a new Language Distribution System ?


Market survey shows: No interference from lighting Lighting controls interfere with existing LDS Sound has to be HiFi CD-quality, Existing LDS systems have S/N ratio 40dB Number of channels to be increased NATO, EU uses 24 channels

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Security Systems LoB Communication

INTEGRUS
Integritas is Latin for: Correctness in language Pureness of the sound Undistorted signals Integrity of the system

The language of perfection !

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Integrus Technical Training


Introduction Benefits & Features Product Overview Benchmarking & Competition

System Technology
System Design & Set up
I&O Manual
Slide 5

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Benefits & Features


Perfect Reception IEC 61603 Standard Part 7 Improved Speech Intelligibility Synchronisation of nr. of Channels

Coverage Checking Function


Language Distribution and More
I&O Manual
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Security Systems LoB Communication

Perfect Reception

Immunity to interference from lighting systems HF gear Dimmers Lighting controls Frequency band 2-8MHz Can even be used in bright sunlight

Other LDS systems

New Bosch

Integrus system
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Security Systems LoB Communication

IEC 61603 Standard Part 7


New standard for digital infra language distribution systems Protocol and modulation technique : - DQPSK modulated signal - Audio is APCM coded - Reed Solomon coder for error concealment Carrier Allocation

-3 dB

2.333

3 Guardband

3.667

4.333

5.667

6.333

f (MHz)

Per carrier: - 4 standard quality mono channels - 2 standard quality stereo channels - 2 premium quality mono channels - 1 premium quality stereo channel
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Security Systems LoB Communication

Great Improved Speech Intelligibility

Frequency response up to 20 kHz Premium quality 20kHz, Music 8 channels stereo 16 channels mono Standard quality 10kHz, Speech 16 channels stereo 32 channels mono Signal to noise ratio more than 80 dB !!!!! Existing LDS systems S/N ratio up to 40 dB Built-in: Bit error correction mode Superior digital audio quality

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Synchronisation of Nr. of Channels


System wide limitation of nr. of channels When the transmitter is configured for transmitting 6 channels, the receiver goes to channel 0 when up is pushed at channel 5 Prevents that the user selects unused channels Results in user friendly channel selection

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Ingenious Coverage Checking Function

To be used during installation / meeting Each receivers can be switched to IR coverage mode Digits in display will mention the quality of reception

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Security Systems LoB Communication

New Technology

Complies with the new IEC 61603-part 7, which is the new industry standard for digital infra-red transmission Digital Transmission protocol Error correction by means of a Reed Solomon coder

inside

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Compatible with every Congress System

Can be connected to discussion systems like CCS 800 for small scale meetings Easy interfacing with DCN to keep proceedings in the digital domain Design of Concentus and Integrus are in line Or interface with every other brand of congress system stand alone language distribution system

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Simultaneous Interpretation
Floor language

Interpreted language

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Language Distribution

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Wireless Language Distribution and More


Language distribution Non commercial Conference centers UN, EU, WIPO, ASEAN ETC Commercial conference centers Universities Parliaments Courts Multi track music distribution Factories Gyms Cinemas Hearing assistance

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Demonstration
Channel 0 Channel 1 Channel 2 Channel 3 Channel 4 Channel 5 Channel 6 DCN floor English Mandarin Music Music Music Music Standard Quality Mono Standard Quality Mono Standard Quality Mono Premium Quality Stereo Standard Quality Stereo Premium Quality Mono Standard Quality Mono

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Integrus Technical Training


Introduction Benefits & Features Product Overview Benchmarking & Competition

System Technology
System Design & Set up
I&O Manual
Slide 18

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Product Overview

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Security Systems LoB Communication

General system overview

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Transmitter

To be connected to conference systems:

Conference systems, like DCN

Built-in mini infra-red radiator Radiator and system status indication Rotary push button Assign a unique name

per transmitter per audio channel

Automatic standby/on function with DCN

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Transmitter

Power on/off switch Stylish 19" (2U) housing


table top use rack mounting

Handgrips for easy transportation 19" rack mounting brackets included Headphone output CD-ROM with multi-lingual installation and operating manual included Product Variants:

LBB 4502/04: 4-Channel LBB 4502/08: 8-Channel LBB 4502/16: 16-Channel LBB 4502/32: 32-Channel

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Infra-Red Transmitters front view

1. Mains on/off switch - Transmitter starts up and the display (3) will light-up. 2. Mini digital IR-radiator - Two infra-red LEDs, transmitting the same signal as the digital radiator outputs. 3. Menu display A 2x16 character LCD-display gives information about the transmitter status and It is also used for the transmitter configuration. 4. Menu button A turn-and-push button to operate the configuration software in combination with the display (3). 5. Monitoring headphone output A 3.5 mm (0.14 in) jack socket to connect a headphone for monitoring purposes. This output can be controlled via the configuration software. Headphone output : 32 Ohm to 2 kOhm
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Security Systems LoB Communication

Infra-Red Transmitter

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Interface module slot Emergency switch connector Auxiliary audio line inputs Audio signal line inputs Earth connection point Input for slave mode Radiator signal outputs Mains input

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Connections to the Transmitter


DCN CCS

system
800 and 6-channel interpreter desks audio sources

External

Emergency
A

signal switch

transmitter in another room

Radiators

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Connecting the DCN system


The

transmitter requires the DCN Interface Module connections between DCN units and the transmitter are made in a loop-through configuration.

The

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Integrus DCN Module


For interfacing with DCN Allows simultaneous interpretation generated by DCN LBB 3423/20

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Mounting the DCN Interface Module

Product: LBB 3423/20 Integrus DCN Module

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Security Systems LoB Communication

DCN system with 30 Channels + Floor


Floor

Channels 1 - 15

AIO modules

Channels 16 - 30

4x

Integrus
7.2.2003

Channels 1 30 + Floor
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Security Systems LoB Communication

Connecting the CCS800 and Interpreter desks

The transmitter requires the Symmetrical Audio Input and Interpreters Module. Up to 12 6-Channels interpreter desks can be loop-through connected to the module. The floor signal for the interpreters desk is connected to the Aux-Left input of the transmitter. The floor signal from a CCS 800 discussion system line output or from an external audio source, such as an audio mixer.

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Symmetrical Audio Input Module

For use with analogue audio systems with 8 symmetrical Inputs Up to 12 6-Channels interpreter desks LBB 3222/0x

Automatic floor selection for unused interpretation channels


LBB 3422/20

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Symmetrical Audio Input Module

LBB 3422/20

T=optional (Beyer type TR/BV3)

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Settings on the Audio Input Module

LBB 3422/10

Floor audio connection from CPSU line output to Aux. input of infra-red transmitter

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Maximum cable length to interpreters desks

Maximum Up to 12 6-Channels interpreter desks can be loopthrough connected to the module.

35 2,9

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Interface connection to Recording System


Audio 1 input

Audio 2 input
Audio 3 input Audio 4 input Audio 5 input Audio 6 input Audio 7 input Audio 8 input Audio Comm Audio AF Supply (+12V) Supply (+12V) Supply (- 12V) Supply (- 12V) Earth

LBB 3422/10

1 14 4 18 2 16 5 17 7 19 8 22 6 20 11 23 9 21 3 15 24 25 12 13 10

OR Floor Channel Channel 1 Channel 2 Channel 3 Channel 4 Channel 5 Channel 6 Busy in Comm. OR2 Auto Relay Supply (+27V) Supply (+27V) Ground Ground Earth

3,3uF/25V
FL. CH.1 CH.2 CH.3 CH.4 CH.5 CH.6

1 14 4 18 2 16 5 17 7 19 8 22 6 20 11 23 9 21 3 15 24 25 12 13 10

I n t e r p r e t e r s D e s k LBB 3222/04
6-Channel Interpreters Desk

Symmetrical Audio Input Module

To be made locally

To recording system
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Security Systems LoB Communication

Connecting other external audio sources

The transmitter has audio inputs to interface with external asymmetrical audio sources.
The audio signals (stereo or mono) are connected to the audio input cinch connectors. When the cinch audio inputs are used in combination with inputs via one of the interface modules, the signals on corresponding channels are mixed.

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Connecting an emergency signal switch

To use the emergency signal function, a switch (normally-open) must be connected to the emergency switch connector.
When the switch is closed, the audio signal on the Aux-Right input is distributed to all output channels, overriding all other audio inputs.

The Aux. Input mode of the transmitter must be set to Mono + Emergency

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Connecting to another transmitter

The transmitter can be operated in slave mode to loop-through the IR radiator signals from a master transmitter. One of the four radiator outputs of the master transmitter is connected with an RG59 cable to the radiator signal loop-through input of the slave transmitter. The Transmission mode of the slave transmitter must be set to Slave
M S

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Connecting radiators to transmitter

The transmitter has four BNC connectors on the rear panel. They can each drive up to 30 radiators in a loop-through configuration.

The radiators are connected with RG59 cables (75 Ohm).


The maximum cable length per output is 900 m.

Automatically cable termination by a built-in detection circuit.

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Connecting radiators to transmitter

Notes:

Never leave an open-ended cable connected to the last radiator in a loop-through chain. When connecting infra-red radiators, do not split the cable, else the system will not function correctly.

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Transmitter menu structure


Transmitter Status

4O Defaults 4N Headphone on/off 4M Mini Radiator on/off 4L Unit Name Source and 2A Volume Software 3C Version 4K Sensitivity Inputs 4J Sensitivity Aux. Right 4 I Sensitivity Aux. Left

Fault Status

Monitoring

4H Aux. Input Mode 3B Board Version 4G Carrier Overview 4F Carrier Settings 3A Board Number 4E Channel Name 4D Language List 4C Channel Quality 4B Number of Channels 4A Transmission Mode

Enquiry

Setup
7.2.2003

4
I&O Manual
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Security Systems LoB Communication

Radiator

Universal mains No fan - cooled by convection

silent operation no moving parts to wear out

LED indicators Auto switch on/off Brackets for mounting on ceiling and floor stand included Adjustable radiator angle (steps of 15) Cover plate

IREDs protection easy to maintain and clean

Attractive and stylish design Product Variants:


LBB 4511/00: Medium-Power Radiator LBB 4512/00: High-Power Radiator

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Infra-Red Radiator

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Radiator

1. Mains 2. BNC input connector BNC signal loop-through connector auto termination 3. Half-power mode switch 4. Delay compensation switches

Rear side

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Receiver

Chip inside Recharging electronics integrated in chip 2-digit LCD display


battery status reception status

Auto mute/squelch Automatic and manual switch off Attractive and stylish design Operation time:

200 hours with disposable batteries (2 x AA) 75 hours with LBB 4550/00 NiMH battery pack

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Receiver

Charging indicator LED 3.5 mm (0.14 in) stereo headphones jack Volume control slide adjuster Channel selection up/down buttons

Product variants:

LBB 4540/04: 4-Channel Pocket Receiver LBB 4550/32: 32-Channel Pocket Receiver

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Receiver
1. Charging indicator LED - Used in combination with the charging equipment. 2. Headphone connector - A 3.5 mm stereo jack output socket, with integrated Stand- by/Off-switch. 3. LCD Display - A two digit display showing the selected channel. An antenna symbol is visible when the receiver picks up an infra red signal of adequate quality. A battery symbol is visible when the battery pack or the batteries are almost empty. 4. Volume control to adjust the volume in steps of 3dB. 5. Channel selector - to select an audio channel. 6. On/Off button - When a headphone is connected, the receiver switches to Stand-by. Pressing the On/Off button the receiver switched to On. To switch back to Stand-by, press and hold the button for approx. 2 seconds. When the headphone is removed, the receiver switches automatically to the Off-state.

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Receiver
7. Battery pack connector - This connection is used to connect the battery pack to the receiver. Charging is automatically disabled when this connector is not used.

8. Charging contacts - Used in combination with the charging equipment to recharge the battery pack (if used).
9. Battery pack or disposable batteries - Either a rechargeable NiMH battery pack (LBB 4550/00) or two disposable AA- 24 size 1.5V batteries.

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Charging Indication

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Security Systems LoB Communication

LCD information during operating mode

Carrier detection symbol


Channel number 0-31 A battery status information symbol is visible on the display when the batteries or the battery pack is almost empty.

31

Operation time:

up to 200 hours with disposable alkaline batteries (2 x AA) up to 75 hours with NiMH rechargeable battery pack (LBB 4550/00)

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Security Systems LoB Communication

LCD information in test mode


To be used during installation. Carrier detection symbol Each receivers can be switched to Infra-Red coverage mode Digits in display will mention the quality of reception

00

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Charging Suitcases

Can accommodate 56 receivers Universal mains

Rapid recharging within 1.45 hours


Charging status indication on the receivers Product Variants:

LBB 4560/00: Charging Suitcase LBB 4560/50: Charging Cabinet LBB 4550/00: NiMH Battery Pack

Accessories:

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Charging Units

LBB 4560/00 /50 1.Mains input - Male Euro mains socket. The charging unit has automatic mains voltage selection 90-260V. 2.Mains on/off switch 3.Receiver positions - One charging unit can charge up to 56 receivers simultaneously. 1 2 3

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Headphones
LBB 3441/00 Under the chin LBB 3443/00 Stereo headphone

LBB 3442/00 Single earphone

LBB 3015/04 Dynamic headphone

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Hands on

Transmitter menu Radiator indicators Test mode of the receiver Charging indicators

7.2.2003

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Integrus Technical Training


Introduction Benefits & Features Product Overview Benchmarking & Competition

System Technology
System Design & Set up
I&O Manual
Slide 56

7.2.2003

Security Systems LoB Communication

Auditel (UK)
IRX

Analogue Audio Complies with IEC 61603 part 3

8 channels Automatic switch off 85 300 hours operation Disposable or charging batteries Battery status check

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Brhler (Germany)
Infracom IRX Analogue Audio Complies with IEC 61603 part 3 Up to 32 channels 125 Hz - 8 kHz Max. 55 dB S/N ratio 75-200 hrs operation Anti-theft option

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Brhler (Germany)
Infracom

Analogue Audio Complies with IEC 61603 part 3

Up to 16 channels
125 Hz - 8 kHz Max. 55 dB S/N ratio

For use with headphones Automatic switch off Disposable or charging batteries

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Security Systems LoB Communication

DIS (Denmark)
IR-15

Analogue Audio Complies with IEC 61603 part 3

16 audio channels 30 Hz 10 kHz For use with headphones Automatic switch off Disposable or charging batteries Their 30 W radiator performs equal to our 12 W radiator

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Security Systems LoB Communication

PRO-SYS ICS (China)


RX-112

Analogue Audio Complies with IEC 61603 part 3

12 audio channels For use with headphones No charging facilities

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Sennheiser (Germany)
Infraport Analogue audio Complies with IEC 61603 part 3 8 or 16 channels 100 Hz - 8 kHz Max. 52 dB S/N ratio 60 g (incl. batteries) 10 hrs operation Ear-tips are not hygienic

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Sennheiser (Germany)
EKI 1029

Analogue Audio Complies with IEC 61603 part 3

4, 7, 12, 16 or 32 audio channels


100 Hz - 8 kHz Max. 52 dB S/N ratio

30 hrs operation For use with headphones Automatic switch off Battery pack only

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Sony (Japan)
SX 2130 Analogue Audio Time-sharing Pulse Position Modulation 13 channels 50 Hz - 5.5 kHz Max. 50 dB S/N ratio 22 hrs operation Rechargeable only

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Taiden (China)
HCS-826R Analogue Audio Time-sharing Pulse Position Modulation 6 and 12 channels 50 Hz - 10 kHz Max. 45 dB S/N ratio 60 hrs operation No charging facilities

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Williams Sound (USA)


WIR RX 12-4 Analogue Audio Wideband FM Modulation 2.3-3.8 MHz 4 channels 25 Hz - 16 kHz Max. 60 dB S/N ratio 30-60 hours operation Disposable batteries or rechargeable batteries

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Bosch (the Netherlands)


Integrus LBB 4540/32: Digital audio Complies with IEC 61603 part 7 32 channels Mono and stereo channels Premium quality: 20Hz -20 KHz Signal to Noise ratio > 80 dB(A) No disturbance from lighting Can be used in bright sunlight Charging electronics integrated Disposable batteries or NiMH battery pack 75/200 hours operation System wide limitation of max. channels Flexible configuration of channel qualities Coverage checking function

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Integrus Technical Training


Introduction Benefits & Features Product Overview Benchmarking & Competition

System Technology
System Design & Set up
I&O Manual
Slide 69

7.2.2003

Security Systems LoB Communication

System Technology

Infra-Red Radiation Signal Processing Transmission Protocol

Carriers and Channels


Audio Encoding and Quality

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I&O Manual

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Security Systems LoB Communication


%
100

Infra- Red spectrum in relation to other spectra

75

50

25

4
0 400

2
500 600 700 800

5
870 900

3 3

Sensitivity of the human eye 4 Sensitivity of the Infra- Red diode at the receiver
5

Daylight spectrum

Intra- Red radiator

1000 nm

Sensitivity of the Infra- Red diode at the receiver with daylight filter
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Security Systems LoB Communication

System Technology

Infra-Red Radiation Signal Processing Transmission Protocol

Carriers and Channels


Audio Encoding and Quality

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I&O Manual

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Signal Processing
Audio Channel 01 A/D Conversion & Compression Protocol Creation & Modulation

4x
Audio Channel 04

4x
A/D Conversion & Compression

Carrier (to IR Radiator)

The Integrus system uses high frequency carrier signals (typically 2-8 MHz) to prevent interference problems with modern light sources. The transmission system converts analogue audio signals to digital frequency modulated infra-red light. The digital audio processing guarantees a constant high audio quality. Receivers pick up the digital frequency modulated infra-red signal and convert it back to an audio signal for a headphone.

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Security Systems LoB Communication

System Technology

Infra-Red Radiation Signal Processing Transmission Protocol

Carriers and Channels


Audio Encoding and Quality

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I&O Manual

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Transmission Protocol

Protocol and modulation technique : according to IEC 60603 part 7

Carrier structure Each carrier contains: synchronization information audio slots data slot(s) A Reed-Solomon RS coder is applied to protect the audio and data information for transmission error Carrier Allocation

-3 dB

2.333

3 Guardband

3.667

4.333

5.667

6.333

f (MHz)

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Transmission Protocol

With four Standard Quality channels

Audio slot A

SQ
Audio slot A

Audio slot B

SQ

data

RS parity

SQ

Audio slot B

SQ

data

RS parity

SYNC

RS frame 0

RS frame 1

RS frame 2

RS frame 3

RS frame 4

RS frame 5

1 super frame

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Transmission Protocol

With two Premium Quality channels

Audio slot A

PQ
Audio slot A

Audio slot B

data

RS parity

PQ

Audio slot B

data

RS parity

SYNC

RS frame 0

RS frame 1

RS frame 2

RS frame 3

RS frame 4

RS frame 5

1 super frame

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Security Systems LoB Communication

System Technology

Infra-Red Radiation Signal Processing Transmission Protocol

Carriers and Channels


Audio Encoding and Quality

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I&O Manual

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Carriers and Channels


This table lists all possible channel combinations per carrier:

Channel Quality
Mono SQ
10kHz 10kHz 10kHz 20kHz 10kHz (L) 20kHz 20kHz (L) 10kHz (R)

Mono PQ
10kHz 10kHz 10kHz

Stereo SQ
10kHz

Stereo PQ
10kHz

20kHz 10kHz (L) 10kHz (L) 10kHz (L) 20kHz 20kHz (R) 10kHz (R) 10kHz (R) 10kHz (R)

Carrier
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Security Systems LoB Communication

System Technology

Infra-Red Radiation Signal Processing Transmission Protocol

Carriers and Channels


Audio Encoding and Quality

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I&O Manual

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Audio Encoding and Quality


Audio

frequency response: Standard Quality mode...: 20 Hz to 10 kHz (-3 dB) Premium Quality.. : 20 Hz to 20 kHz (-3 dB) harmonic distortion at 1kHz : < 0.05 % attenuation at 4 kHz.. : > 80 dB : > 80 dB : > 80 dB(A)

Total

Crosstalk Dynamic

range.. signal-to-noise ratio..

Weighted

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Integrus Technical Training


Introduction Benefits & Features Product Overview Benchmarking & Competition

System Technology
System Design & Set up
I&O Manual
Slide 82

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Security Systems LoB Communication

System Design & Set up


Aspects to Consider Planning an Infra-Red System Calculating Delay Switch Positions Testing the System

Case Study

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I&O Manual

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Aspects to Consider

Radiation Requirements The Sensitivity of the Receiver The Footprint of the Radiator

Ambient Lighting
Objects, Surfaces and Reflections Overlapping Footprints and Multipath Effects

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I&O Manual

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Radiation requirements

All delegates have to receive the distributed signals without disturbance. An Integrus receiver needs a minimum of 4 mW/m2 to work without errors. (resulting in a 80 dB S/N ratio for the audio channels). Use enough radiators, placed at well planned positions, so that uniform IR-radiation covers whole area.

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Aspects to Consider

Radiation Requirements The Sensitivity of the Receiver The Footprint of the Radiator

Ambient Lighting
Objects, Surfaces and Reflections Overlapping Footprints and Multipath Effects

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I&O Manual

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Security Systems LoB Communication

The Sensitivity of the Receiver

The sensitivity of a receiver is at its best when it is aimed directly towards a radiator. The axis of maximum sensitivity is tilted upwards at an angle of 45 degrees (see figure 1.5). Rotating the receiver will decrease the sensitivity. For rotations of less than +/- 45 degrees this effect is not large, but for larger rotations the sensitivity will decrease rapidly.

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Aspects to Consider

Radiation Requirements The Sensitivity of the Receiver The Footprint of the Radiator

Ambient Lighting
Objects, Surfaces and Reflections Overlapping Footprints and Multipath Effects

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I&O Manual

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Security Systems LoB Communication

The Footprint of a Radiator

This is the floor area in which the direct signal is strong enough to ensure proper reception, when the receiver is directed towards the radiator.

The size and position of the footprint depends on the: mounting height mounting angle number of transmitted carriers

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Radiator Footprint = L x W
M0 20 50 15 M0 20 45 50 M0 20 50 90

Floor

Floor

Floor

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Total Coverage Area for One to Eight Carriers

Carriers
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Security Systems LoB Communication

Radiator Coverage Area

..Meters

Polar diagram of the radiation pattern for 1, 2, 4 and 8 carriers


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Security Systems LoB Communication

Aspects to Consider

Radiation Requirements The Sensitivity of the Receiver The Footprint of the Radiator

Ambient Lighting
Objects, Surfaces and Reflections Overlapping Footprints and Multipath Effects

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I&O Manual

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Ambient Lighting

The Integrus system is immune for the effect of ambient lighting. Fluorescent lamps (with or without electronic ballast or dimming facility), such as TL lamps or energy saving lamps give no problems.

Sunlight and artificial lighting with incandescent or halogen lamps up to 1000 lux give no problems.

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Aspects to Consider

Radiation Requirements The Sensitivity of the Receiver The Footprint of the Radiator

Ambient Lighting
Objects, Surfaces and Reflections Overlapping Footprints and Multipath Effects

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I&O Manual

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Objects, surfaces and reflections

The presence of objects in a conference venue can influence the distribution of infra-red light. The texture and colour of the objects, walls and ceilings also plays an important role. Infra-red radiation is reflected from almost all surfaces. As is the case with visible light, smooth, bright or shiny surfaces reflect well. Dark or rough surfaces absorb large proportions of the infra-red signal.

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Aspects to Consider

Radiation Requirements The Sensitivity of the Receiver The Footprint of the Radiator

Ambient Lighting
Objects, Surfaces and Reflections Overlapping Footprints and Multipath Effects

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I&O Manual

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Overlapping Footprints and Multipath Effect

When the footprints of two radiators partly overlap, the total coverage area can be larger than the sum of the two separate footprints.

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Overlapping Footprints and Multipath Effect

However, differences in the delays of the signals picked up by the receiver from two or more radiators can result in that the signals cancel each other out (multi path effect).

In worst-case situations this can lead to a loss of reception at such positions (black spots).

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Cable Signal Delay Example

Transmitter

Overlapping areas without Signal delay by use of the same cable lengths

50m R2 R1

50m

10m 50m

Overlapping area with Signal delay caused Multipath (black spots) by use of different cable lengths

35m R2 R1

50m

10m 50m

Cable lengths . Delay switch position Radiator 1 = 50m 0 Radiator 2 = 50m 0

Cable lengths . Delay switch position Radiator 1 = 35m 0 Radiator 2 = 50m 0

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Transmitter

Security Systems LoB Communication

Cable Signal Delay Differences

When radiators are loop-through connected, the cabling between each radiator and the transmitter should be as symmetrical as possible The differences in cable signal delays can be compensated with the signal delay compensation switches on the radiators.

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Cable Signal Delay Example not compensated


7m
R3 R4 R3

7m
R4

Overlapping areas without Signal delay by use of the same cable lengths
R2 100m 100m 100m R1

Overlapping areas with Signal delay caused Multipath (black spots) by use of different cable lengths
R2 R1

7m

100m

Transmitter

60m

7m

20m

Transmitter

Cable lengths . Radiator 1 = 100m Radiator 2 = 100m Radiator 3 = 100m Radiator 4 = 100m

Delay switch position 0 0 0 0

Cable lengths . Radiator 1 = 20m Radiator 2 = 27m Radiator 3 = 87m Radiator 4 = 94m

Delay switch position 0 0 0 0

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Cable Signal Delay Example - compensated


Delay switch positions
7m
R3 R4

7m
R3 R4

Overlapping areas with Signal delay caused Multipath (black spots) by use of different cable lengths
R2 60m R1

Overlapping areas without Signal delay by use of the delay switches on the radiators
R2 20m R1

7m

Transmitter

60m

7m

20m

Transmitter

Cable lengths . Radiator 1 = 20m Radiator 2 = 27m Radiator 3 = 87m Radiator 4 = 94m

Delay switch position 0 0 0 0

Cable lengths . Radiator 1 = 20m Radiator 2 = 27m Radiator 3 = 87m Radiator 4 = 94m

Delay switch position 11 10 1 0

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Calculation tool

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Radiation Signal Delay

A situation in which a radiation signal delay occurs.

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Calculation tool

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Security Systems LoB Communication

System Design & Set up


Aspects to Consider Planning an Infra-Red System Calculating Delay Switch Positions Testing the System

Case Study

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I&O Manual

Slide 105

Security Systems LoB Communication

Planning an Infra-Red System


General Guidelines Positioning of the Radiators Planning the Radiator Lay-out

Planning the Cabling

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I&O Manual

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Security Systems LoB Communication

General Guidelines

Surface the area that has to be covered with infra-red signals. Use the correct footprints, therefore the following information must be known: the ambient lighting conditions the number of carriers that will be used the type of radiators to be used the mounting place, height and angle of the radiators the receiver position in relation to the radiators Extra radiators may be needed when: participants must also be able to receive infra-red signals when 'walking around. delegates seated on a podium listeners on the Balconies

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Planning an Infra-Red System


General Guidelines Positioning of the Radiators Planning the Radiator Lay-out

Planning the Cabling

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I&O Manual

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Positioning the Radiators


Receivers

pick up direct path infra-red radiation

Reflections

improve the signal reception and should therefore not be minimised.

Combination of direct and reflected radiation


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Combination of several reflected radiation


Slide 109

Security Systems LoB Communication

Wrong Positioning of the Radiator

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Correctly Positioning of the Radiator

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Positioning the Radiators

Covering seats in a square arrangement

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Positioning the Radiators

A conference hall with auditorium seating and podium

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Positioning the Radiators

Under balconies, you should cover the shaded area with an additional radiator

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Planning an Infra-Red System


General Guidelines Positioning of the Radiators Planning the Radiator Lay-out

Planning the Cabling

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I&O Manual

Slide 115

Security Systems LoB Communication

Rectangular Footprints
X = 9,5 M L = 48 M W = 27 M
20 Footprint Calculation

15

RFP = 1296 M2
TFP = 2026 M2
Y [m]
-20 -15 -10 -5

10

RFP
X L
10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60

TFP
65 70

0 0 -5 5

W
-10 -15

-20 X [m]

LBB 4512/00 with 1 Carrier in use, Mounting height 0 m, Angle 0o


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FP Calculation

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Rectangular Footprints
Footprint Calculation 20

X = -10 M
L = 20 M W = 20 M RFP RFP = 400 M
L

15

10

X
Y [m]
-20 -15 -10 -5

0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45

TFP = 617 M
50 55 60 65 70

w -5
-10

TFP

-15

-20 X [m]

LBB 4512/00 with 1 Carrie in use, Mounting height 10 m, Angle 90o


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FP Calculation

Slide 117

Security Systems LoB Communication

Rectangular Footprints

The guaranteed rectangular footprints for various number of carriers.

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I&O Manual

Slide 118

Security Systems LoB Communication

Increased Coverage

For systems with up to 4 carriers and overlapping areas the distance between the radiators can be increased by a factor 1.4

1.4 W

1.4L

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Planning an Infra-Red System


General Guidelines Positioning of the Radiators Planning the Radiator Lay-out

Planning the Cabling

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I&O Manual

Slide 120

Security Systems LoB Communication

Planning the Radiator Cabling

In order to minimize the risk of black spots, use equal cable length from transmitter to radiator if possible.

Transmitter

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Planning the Radiator cabling

Symmetrical arrangement of radiator cabling (recommended)

Transmitter

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Planning the Radiator Cabling

Asymmetrical arrangement of radiator cabling (to be avoided)

Transmitter

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Security Systems LoB Communication

System Design & Set up


Aspects to Consider Planning an Infra-Red System Calculating Delay Switch Positions Testing the System

Case Study

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I&O Manual

Slide 124

Security Systems LoB Communication

Signal delay calculation

Setting the radiator delay compensation switches

Differences in cable length between the transmitter and the radiators can cause black spots as a result of the multipath effect.
The IR signal from a radiator with a long cable is delayed with respect to the signal from a radiator with a shorter cable. To compensate these cable length differences, the delay of a radiator can be increased to make it equal to the signal delay of the other radiators. This signal delay can be set with delay switches at the back of the radiator.

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Radiation Signal Delay

A situation in which a radiation signal delay occurs.

For systems with more than four carriers, add one delay switch position per 10 meter difference in signal path length to the radiators which are closest to the overlapping coverage area.
In this Figure the signal path length difference is 12 meter. Add one delay switch position to the calculated switch position(s) for the radiator(s) under the balcony.

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Calculation tool

Slide 126

Security Systems LoB Communication

Signal delay calculation

Two ways for determining delay compensation switch positions of the radiator. 1.By measuring the cable lengths 1.1 Manual 1.2 delay switch calculation tool (recommended) 2.By using a delay measuring tool

2.1 Manual
2.2 delay switch calculation tool (recommended)

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Signal delay calculation 1.1

To determine the delay switch position based on cable lengths and calculating manually follow the next steps: 1. Measure the lengths of the cables between the transmitter and each radiator. 2. Multiply these cable length differences with the cable signal delay per meter (the manufacturer specified factor). This is the cable signal delay difference for that radiator. 3. Determine the maximum signal delay.

4. Calculate for each radiator the signal delay difference with the maximum signal delay.
5. Divide the signal delay difference by 33. The rounded off figure is the signal delay switch position for that radiator. 6. Set the delay switches to the calculated switch positions.

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Cable Measuring

Slide 128

Security Systems LoB Communication

Signal delay calculation 1

Transmitter

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Signal delay calculation 1.2

To determine the delay switch position based on cable lengths and the delay switch calculation tool follow the next steps:
1. Start the calculation tool 2. Select system type

3. Fill-in the cable signal delay per meter of the used cable. (specified by the cable manufacturer).
4. Fill-in the number of radiator(s) on each output 5. Fill-in the measured cable lengths of the cables between the transmitter and each radiator. 6. Set the delay switches on the radiator(s) to the automatically calculated switch positions.

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Calculation tool

Slide 130

Security Systems LoB Communication

Signal delay calculation 2.1

To determine the delay switch position by delay measuring tool and calculating manually follow the next steps: 1. Disconnect the cable from a radiator output of the transmitter and connect this to a delay measurement tool.

2. Disconnect the cable from the first radiator in that trunk.


3. Measure the impulse response time (in ns) of the cable(s) between that transmitter and the radiator. 4. Reconnect the cable to the radiator and repeat steps 2 to 4 for the other radiators (started by the next radiator in that trunk). 5. Reconnect the cable to the transmitter and repeat step 2 to 5 for the other radiator outputs of the transmitter. 6. Divide the impulse response times for each radiator by two. These are the cable signal delays for each radiator.

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Signal delay calculation 2.1


7. Determine the maximum signal delay. 8. Calculate for each radiator the signal delay difference with the maximum signal delay. 9. Divide the signal delay difference by 33. The rounded off figure is the delay switch position for that radiator. 10.Set the delay switches to the calculated switch positions.

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Delay Measuring

Slide 132

Security Systems LoB Communication

Signal delay calculation 2.2


584 ns 350 ns

237 ns

Transmitter

563 ns

339 ns

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Signal delay calculation 2.2

To determine the delay switch position by delay measuring tool and the delay switch calculation tool the follow the next steps:

1.Start the calculation tool, Select system type, Fill-in the number of radiator(s) on each output
2.Disconnect the cable from a radiator output of the transmitter and connect this to a delay measurement tool. 3.Disconnect the cable from the first radiator in that trunk. 4.Measure the impulse response time (in ns) of the cable(s) between that transmitter and the radiator. 5.Enter this impulse response time in the calculation tool. 6.Reconnect the cable to the radiator and repeat steps 2 to 4 for the other radiators (started by the next radiator in that trunk).
Calculation tool

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Signal delay calculation 2.2


7.Reconnect the cable to the transmitter and repeat step 2 to 5 for the other radiator outputs of the transmitter. 8.When the cable signal delays are known, the delay switch calculation tool will calculate the delay switch positions automatically.

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Calculation tool

Slide 135

Security Systems LoB Communication

Signal delay calculation with more transmitters

When radiators in one multi purpose room are connected to two transmitters, an extra signal delay is added by:

Transmission from master transmitter to slave transmitter (cable signal delay).

Transmission through the slave transmitter.

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Calculation tool

Slide 136

Security Systems LoB Communication

Signal delay calculation with more transmitters

For calculating the delay switch positions for a system with a masterslave configuration, use the following procedure: 1.Calculate the cable signal delay for each radiator, using the procedures for a system with one transmitter.

2.Calculate the signal delay of the cable between the master and the slave transmitter in the same way as for cables between a transmitter and a radiator.
3.Add to the cable signal delay of the cable between the master and the slave, the delay of the slave transmitter itself: 33 ns. This gives the master-to-slave signal delay. 4.Add the master-to-slave signal delay to each radiator connected to the slave transmitter.

5.Determine the maximum signal delay.


Calculation tool

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Slide 137

Security Systems LoB Communication

Signal delay calculation with more transmitters


6.Calculate for each radiator the signal delay difference with the maximum signal delay. 7.Divide the signal delay difference by 33. The rounded off figure is the signal delay switch position for that radiator.

8.Set the delay switches to the calculated delay switch positions.

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Calculation tool

Slide 138

Security Systems LoB Communication

Signal delay calculation with more transmitters


R10
20m 20m 20m

R7

R5

R2
20m

R8

R3

R9 30m 20m

R6

R4

R1 30m 20m

30m

30m

Tx Master

50m

Tx Slave

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Signal delay calculation with more transmitters

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Slide 140

Security Systems LoB Communication

System Design & Set up


Aspects to Consider Planning an Infra-Red System Calculating Delay Switch Positions Testing the System

Case Study

7.2.2003

I&O Manual

Slide 141

Security Systems LoB Communication

Testing the reception quality

An extensive reception quality test must be done to make sure that the whole area is covered with IR radiation of adequate strength. Such a test can be done during installation and during the meeting: Test during installation: 1. Check that all radiators are connected and powered up and that no loose cables are connected to a radiator. Switch the transmitter off and on. (needed for the auto signal equalisation) 2. Set the transmitter in the Test-mode. For each channel a different frequency test tone will be transmitted. 3. Set a receiver on the highest available channel and listen via the headphones to the transmitted test tone. 4. For testing all positions follow the instruction of chapter 1.6 of the Integrus Installation and Operating Instructions

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Security Systems LoB Communication

Testing the reception quality

Testing during the meeting:

1.Set a receiver in the Test-mode and select the highest available carrier. The quality of the received carrier signal is indicated on the display of the receiver. The quality indication should be between 00 and 39 (good reception).
2.For testing all positions follow the instruction of chapter 1.6 of the Integrus Installation and Operating Instructions

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Security Systems LoB Communication

System Design & Set up


Aspects to Consider Planning an Infra-Red System Calculating Delay Switch Positions Testing the System

Case Study

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I&O Manual

Slide 144

Security Systems LoB Communication

Case Study NATO Summit

Prague, November 2002 Total rental package Very successful !! 22 languages DCN Integrus

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Slide 145

Security Systems LoB Communication

End of section System Design & Set up


Robert Bosch GmbH reserves all rights even in the event of industrial

property rights. We reserve all rights of disposal such as copying and passing on to third parties.

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Slide 146

Security Systems LoB Communication

Integrus is.

Perfect reception Great improved speech intelligibility Easy channel selection Easy interfacing with DCN and other congress systems Ingenious coverage checking function Wireless language distribution and more

Questions

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Slide 147

Security Systems LoB Communication

What about compatibility with IR Analog ?

IR analog and Integrus system can be used simultaneously: Each with its own transmitter, radiators and receivers The analog radiators can be used in Integrus, but with limitations: Maximum 4 radiators, with equal cable length. Not more than 4 carriers (equals 16 channels max). Not more than 100 m cable per outlet. DCN Interface Module can be used with Integrus: LBB 3423/00 version 01.04: no automatic max channel synchronisation LBB 3423/00 version 01.05: front panel has to be removed, fully compatible LBB 3423/20: fully compatible Symmetrical Audio Input and Interpreters Module can be used with Integrus: LBB 3422/10: Resistor has to be removed, then fully compatible LBB 3423/20: fully compatible

The transmitters, charging suitcases and receivers are not compatible

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Security Systems LoB Communication

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Slide 149