Arlene Carney Faculty and Academic Affairs

Student Learning Outcomes

Student Learning Outcomes
• Developed by the Council for Enhancing Student Learning in 2003. • Approved by the Faculty Senate in 2007.

Student Learning Outcomes
At the time of receiving a bachelor’ degree, students: • can identify, define, and solve problems

Student Learning Outcomes
At the time of receiving a bachelor’ degree, students: • can locate and critically evaluate information

Student Learning Outcomes
At the time of receiving a bachelor’ degree, students: • have mastered a body of knowledge and a mode of inquiry

Student Learning Outcomes
At the time of receiving a bachelor’ degree, students: • understand diverse philosophies and cultures within and across societies

Student Learning Outcomes
At the time of receiving a bachelor’ degree, students: • can communicate effectively

Student Learning Outcomes
At the time of receiving a bachelor’ degree, students: • understand the role of creativity, innovation, discovery, and expression across disciplines

Student Learning Outcomes
At the time of receiving a bachelor’ degree, students: • have acquired skills for effective citizenship and life-long learning

Student Learning Outcomes
• Implementation is ongoing with 15 pilot departments. –They are mapping their curricula onto the SLOs. –They meet with us to discuss their progress.

Student Learning Outcomes
can identify, define, and solve problems can locate and critically evaluate information have mastered of a body of knowledge and a mode of inquiry understand diverse philosophies and cultures within and across societies can communicate effectively understand the role of creativity, innovation, discovery, and expression across disciplines have acquired skills for effective citizenship & lifelong learning

Liberal Education

Major

Minor

Student Learning Outcomes
• The seven SLOs can be considered “umbrellas.” • Departments will determine specific elaborations for each of the SLOs that may be discipline specific.

Can identify, define, and solve problems

Non-discipline specific: You will use information to answer questions and/or solve problems. You will use information technologies to solve problems. You will organize information to present a sound, central idea supported by relevant material in a logical order From a sample rubric, Suskie 2004

Can identify, define, and solve problems

Arts Disciplines: You will select and use a variety of construction materials with different characteristics (e.g. strength, durability, cost, etc.) to design public sculptures. You will develop vocal control and movement techniques as a basis for creating characters in at least five different scenes.

Can identify, define, and solve problems

Natural/Physical Sciences Disciplines: You will gain experience doing a variety of scientific protocols, using modern research equipment and strategies. You will be learning how to make observations, develop hypotheses, design experiments, and interpret data. You will gain additional experience using mathematical concepts and tools to analyze, evaluate, and present data.
Robin Wright, University of Minnesota, Biology 2002, Fall 2008

Can locate and critically evaluate information

You will learn how to find information and data, evaluate it, and synthesize it to solve problems or make decisions.* You will be able to read, interpret, and analyze a map (both in terms of what is visible and hidden).** You will be able to use at least three search engines (Medline, PsychInfo, and ERIC) to locate materials for class presentations.

*Wright, 2008 (Biology); **Kessler, Frostberg College, 2008 (Geography)

Have mastered a body of knowledge and a mode of inquiry.

History: You will be able to use original sources to discuss philosophical issues related to the nature of history. Finance: You will be able to understand the theory and apply, in real world situations, the techniques that have been developed in corporate finance.

*UNC Fayetteville, 2008; **Damodaran, NYU, 2008

Have mastered a body of knowledge and a mode of inquiry.

Political Psychology: You will be familiar with the modes of thinking, theorizing, and inquiry that are characteristic of political psychology.* Chemical Engineering: You will learn the fundamental characteristics of materials including mechanical and electronic properties, as well as magnetic or optical or superconducting properties. **

*Steenbergen, UNC & Transue, Duke, 2006; Chem Eng UM, 2007

Understand diverse philosophies and cultures within and across societies.

Family Social Science: You will gain experience with family systems, including family diversity studies. Journalism: You will write and speak knowledgeably about increasing racial and ethnic diversity in the US, including census and related demographic patterns and projections as they relate to media specifically and society generally. (Jour 3745, UM, 2008)

Understand diverse philosophies and cultures within and across societies.

Chicano Studies: You will learn how to evaluate and interpret moving images, visual symbols, and the narrative of cinema as an art form, but also as a means of (re)constructing and maintaining an ethnic identity. (Mendoza, 2007) Psychology: You will learn the constituent properties of happiness, in terms of both basic mechanisms and individual differences. (MacDonald, 2008)

Can communicate effectively.

Creative Writing: You will have an opportunity to produce written work in two genres for review by your peers.* Public Speaking: You should be able to identify and critique established positions in public debates, develop solid arguments in response to these positions, and effectively voice these arguments to appropriate audiences.

*Manis, Penn State, 2008; **Damodaran, NYU, 2008 (Finance)

Can communicate effectively.

Nursing: You will develop skills for listening to patients, writing notes and reports, and communicating orally to provide effective patient care. Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences: You will create a journal in which you describe and analyze the communication strategies used in your service learning site.

Understand the role of creativity, innovation, discovery, and expression across the disciplines.

Psychology: You will be able to describe major classes of psychological disorder and their symptoms and will become aware of accuracies versus myths regarding how such disorders are portrayed in the popular media. (Luciana, 2007) Cultural Studies: You will analyze ways in which suburbia has figured in high, low, and popular culture, and its role in shaping politics, economy, work, family, and domesticity. (Archer, 2007)

Understand the role of creativity, innovation, discovery, and expression across the disciplines.

CFANS Intro Course on Biotechnology: Students will learn: How to clone a gene. How to genetically modify microbes, plants, and animals. What is possible, and what is not possible, using the tools of biotechnology. How biotechnology is likely to impact your life. How biotechnology is likely to impact the environment. How different people view biotechnology. How biotechnology influences -- and is influenced by -- ethical, legal, economic and social issues.

Have acquired skills for effective citizenship and life-long learning

Communication Studies: You will understand how rhetoric shapes the meaning of events and public life.* Applied Economics: You will gain an ethical perspective on public policy issues related to food and the food industry.**

*Wilson, UM, 2008 (UM); **Kinsey & Senauer, 2007 (UM)

Student Learning Outcomes
• Final key to success is assessment of each of these outcomes. • How do we know that students have learned? • How do we change our courses to enhance learning?