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CQB

Entry Tactics

Principals of CQB:
Surprise

Speed
Violence of Action

Eight Fundamentals of CQB:


Dominate the Enclosure Eliminate All Threats Control All Occupants Search the Dead Search the Room Search the Living Sit Rep Evacuation on Command

Initiative Based Tactics (IBT)


Definition: IBT are enclosure clearing tactics that are driven by the actions and initiative of the individual shooters. A baseline knowledge of the techniques and fundamentals is common to all, but the application of these skills is directed by the challenges of the particular scenario and the courses of action that the shooters choose to follow.

IBT Definition Cont.


The shooters do not pre-plan their activities in IBT, they act and react based on the situations that they are confronted with. IBT was developed in order to create a close quarters battle system that was flexible enough to be used by all Special Operation Units.

Three Primary Rules of IBT:


Cover all Immediate Danger Areas Eliminate All Threats Protect Your Buddies (Fourth Unofficial Rule: Make No Mistakes!)

Verbal Commands for IBT:


Clear Support Closing / Close Out Big Room Slinging / Sling Rolling / Roll Last Man Turn and Go Pick Me Up

The Stack

Entering and Objective:


The Team Stack:
The movement involved in conducting a team stack is very important. It is at this time that the team is most vulnerable to compromise. As a result, there must be complete noise/light discipline and all-around security as the team members form the stack.

Passing the Ready Signal:


Once the point man is ready he will give a thumbs up, nod or verbal indicator that he is ready. Each member in turn will pass back the thumbs up when they are ready. Last man in the stack, after receiving the thumbs up, will give a squeeze either on the shoulder or back of the leg to the shooter in front of him when he is ready. This is past back up the stack to the #1 man who nods his head to show acknowledgement.

Passing the Ready Signal Cont:


When the Team Leader (TL) sees the #1 man nod his head he can call Control and inform them that the team is ready and awaiting further commands. As he calls in the brevity code in accordance with the Execution Checklist, he will also give a hand & arm signal, per Unit SOP, to alert the DM / Sniper Teams.

Checking Accessibility of the Entry Point:


#1 man visually inspects the entry point for booby traps and other obstacles. Ideally, an explosive breach is preferred for the initial entry. If a breach is not being used, the #1 man will go to the index position and check accessibility of the hatch/door. If hatch/door is secured the breacher will be called up. If hatch/door is unsecured, a diversionary device will be prepared for use during the entry.

Entering the Objective:


On the command to execute the #1 shooter enters through the doorway and clears it. Next he must travel through and clear the immediate area. The immediate area is defined as the area just inside the doorway where a man or obstacle could impede the movement of the shooter or his team. It occupies a six foot radius inside the doorway.

Two Methods of Entry:


Pre-Determined

Undetermined

Pre-Determined:
Means that before the team enters the enclosure they know exactly where they are supposed to go (individual assignments). The entry is rehearsed in detail and the team knows the layout of the objective.

Undetermined:
Means that the team does not know the layout of the objective and has no set plan for entry. The team members key off one another to successfully enter and dominate the enclosure.

Entry Techniques:
Criss-Cross

Button Hook
Combination

Criss-Cross

Button Hook

Combination

Points of Domination and Areas of Responsibility


Although there are many different tactics and techniques out there we will be working primarily with two:
Long Wall On Line

2 Man Entry Long Wall


#1 Man enters, clears immediate area and picks up the corner. He moves to the far wall approximately 2/3 deep all while sweeping his sector of fire from outboard to inboard. Engaging of threats will be done while moving to the point of domination.

Direction of flow

2 Man Entry Long Wall


#2 Man enters and moves in the opposite direction of #1. #2 shooter MUST be in the hip pocket of the #1 shooter. #2 picks up his corner and established a point of domination at least 3 ft inside the room and 3ft off the wall. #2 also sweeps sector of fire outboard to inboard.

Direction of flow

2 Man Entry Long Wall


2 Man Entry Showing Interlocking fields of fire

3 & 4 Man Entry Long Wall


#3 Man enter and moves opposite direction of #2 Man. #3 Man sector of fire is from inboard to outboard, sweeping towards the side he supports.

Direction of flow

2 Man Entry Long Wall


3 Man Entry Showing Interlocking fields of fire

3 & 4 Man Entry Long Wall


#4 Man enter and moves opposite direction of #3 Man. #4 Man sector of fire is from inboard to outboard, sweeping towards the side he supports.

Direction of flow

3 & 4 Man Entry Long Wall


4 Man Entry showing interlocking fields of fire.

1 2
Direction of flow

3 & 4 Man Entry Long Wall


Keys to Remember:
Shooters must enter in one fluid movement, no gaps. Engage threats while moving to your point of domination. Be aware of your shooting lanes (3 & 4 usually have narrow lanes). #1 man ONLY runs the long wall.

1 2
Direction of flow

Points of Domination & Areas of Responsibility:


Two shooters in a room minimum. 3 is better than 2 and 4 is better that 3. However, size of the room does dictate. #1 man has option to cross over or button hook and #2 man reads off of him. However, cross over is most common. The more shooters in the room the narrower the shooting lanes become. #1 man may stop his long wall short due to threats or structure lay out (team reacts appropriately).

Points of Domination & Areas of Responsibility:


The purpose of running the long wall and establishing points of domination is that:
#1 man can clear behind many deep threats. With shooters moving it causes the threats to take time and respond (OODA Loop) A moving target (lateral movement) is more difficult to hit than a stationary. By establishing points of domination (both long wall and on-line) it allows more shooters to have a shooting angle on potential threats.

3 & 4 Man Entry Long Wall

1 2
Direction of flow

Points of Domination & Areas of Responsibility:


The On-Line technique is similar to the Long Wall, the only difference is that when using the On-Line technique the #1 man does not penetrate the depth of the room. All shooters are on line keeping the problem in front of them.

Points of Domination & Areas of Responsibility:


#1 & #2 Men must pick up their corners! On entry, shooters must be in each others hip pockets. As the Navy would say, Nut to Butt. Stay off the walls at least 2ft. Ricochets travel approximately 12-18 inches off the wall. This space also allows others to move behind you.

Long Wall:
Center Fed Room

2 4
Direction of Flow

Long Wall:
Corner fed room showing interlocking fields of fire

1 3 4 2
Direction of Flow

Long Wall:
Corner fed room

4 3

2
Direction of Flow

On Line:
Center fed room showing interlocking fields of fire

2
Direction of Flow

On Line:
Corner fed room

Direction of Flow

Hallway Movement:

Hallway formations:
V technique Wedge Split stack
Side by Side Rolling Point

Single stack
High-Low

Side by Side

Side by Side Using Rolling Point

4
#1 man / men move past the entry point Remaining shooters enter room

3 2 1

Side by Side Using Rolling Point


2 4 3 1

1
2

Side by Side Using Rolling Point


3
4

2
1

4
3 2

Side by Side

4
#1 man / men move to entry point

3 2 1

Side by Side
2 1

4
Entry is made minimum of two shooters Remaining shooters in the stack pick up security

Clearing Corners
1 Man Barricade

High Low
Running the Rabbit

1 Man Barricade
Shooter closes in on a corner or area that needs to be cleared. After ensuring he has another shooter, barricades around the corner clearing the area. Used in tight hallways or constricted spaces. Can be done from high or low position. Can be done in dynamic mode or stealth (slicing the pie).

High - Low
2 Man technique. Lead shooter (usually) takes low position and 2 Man takes high. Shooters coordinate their movement and clear the corner or constricted space. Used in tight hallways or constricted spaces. Low man controls the pace. Can be done both dynamic or stealth.

Running the Rabbit


2 Man technique used to clear wide hallways or L shaped rooms. This is a dynamic clearing technique. Timing is everything.

Running the Rabbit


Shooters identify the L shape problem

Running the Rabbit


Shooters coordinate movement. Outboard shooter is in the best position to be the Rabbit.

Running the Rabbit


Outboard shooter moves rapidly across the open area drawing attention. Second shooter prepares to barricade around the corner.

Running the Rabbit


After a momentary pause, second shooter barricades around the corner

Team Movement

Team Movement

Team Movement

Team Movement

Team Movement

Team Movement

Team Movement

Team Movement

Team Movement

Team Movement

Team Movement

Conclusion
These are some of the basics and there is always something else to learn. Not every technique is going to work for every situation, you must be flexible. A true warrior has no preference.

Conclusion
Train hard and realistic. Be critical and honest. Test your tactics to see if they REALLY work. Stay Alert and Stay Alive!

Questions?

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