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I AM A CHILD OF GOD

Improving Teaching in Primary

I AM A CHILD OF GOD
I am a child of God, And so my needs are great; Help me to understand his words Before it grows too late. Lead me, guide me, walk beside me, Help me find the way. Teach me all that I must do To live with Him someday.

I am a child of God,
And so my needs are great;

IMPROVING BEHAVIOR IN THE CLASSROOM

CHERYL A. ESPLIN, GENERAL PRIMARY 2ND COUNSELOR


We can know our children are beginning to understand the doctrine when we see it revealed in their attitudes and actions without external threats or rewards. As our children learn to understand gospel doctrines, they become more self-reliant and more responsible.

R E A S O N S F O R B E H AV I O R P RO B L E M S
The individual may be trying to avoid a situation, place, or person. He or she may be seeking attention, time alone, control, and so forth. He or she may be expressing physical needs such as hunger, thirst, or fatigue. The individual may be indicating medical problems such as illness, pain, or the effects of medication. The individual may be expressing emotions such as anger, fear, anxiety, sadness, confusion, happiness, or frustration.

ESTABLISH A FEW SIMPLE RULES


Take time to create classroom rules with

the help of your class.


Express your feelings about the gospel, and explain that you want to help others learn gospel truths. Discuss the responsibility we have to help one another learn the gospel. Talk about the importance of participating in lessons. Ask those present to suggest things they can do to help create a learning atmosphere.

SEEKING THE SPIRIT AND BEING FLEXIBLE

OTHER WAYS TO HELP


Create a positive classroom atmosphere where every member feels safe and loved. Look for opportunities to offer specific praise for positive behaviors.

Avoid responding with anger, threats, punishment, or criticism.


Learn about any disabilities or circumstances that may contribute to a behavior. Avoid power struggles. Help the individual learn to express his or her needs in an appropriate way.

Help me to understand his words


Before it grows too late.

TEACHING STRATEGIES

CHERYL A. ESPLIN, GENERAL PRIMARY 2ND COUNSELOR


Teaching our children to understand is more than just imparting information. Its helping our children get the doctrine into their hearts in a way that it becomes part of their very being and is reflected in their attitudes and behaviors throughout their lives.

ADAPTING LESSONS
Church-produced lesson manuals are carefully prepared to ensure that the doctrines of the Church are kept pure. They establish guidelines for teaching in Church settings,

and they ensure a consistent approach to


gospel topics and principles. You should be true to the teachings and guidelines in these manuals. Howeveryou may adapt the lessons according to the needs and circumstances of those you teach.

Identify

Understand

Share

HELPING CHILDREN IDENTIFY THE DOCTRINE


Reveal one word at a time as the children try to determine what the statement is. Consider covering each word with paper, placing the words around the room, or writing the first letter of each word on the chalkboard. Have the children create simple pantomimes or hand actions. Discover It Invite the children to search scripture verses to learn about the doctrine. Ask the children to state the doctrine. Write the doctrine on the chalkboard. Scramble the words of the doctrine. Ask the children to arrange the words so they make sense.

Reveal It

State It Write It

Pantomime It

Scramble It

HELPING CHILDREN U N D E R S TA N D D O C T R I N E
Have children search scripture passages and teachings of latter-day prophets to understand the doctrine. Ask them to develop questions that could be answered with the scriptures and the teachings.

Ask Questions

Discuss the Doctrine

Have children search scripture passages or quotations of latterday prophets and discuss what they learn about the doctrine.

Match a Picture

Have children match pictures or drawings to scripture passages and teachings.

Look for Answers

Invite the children to look in the scriptures and teachings of latterday prophets for answers to questions about the doctrine.

Fill in the Blanks

Write an incomplete statement about the doctrine on the board. Invite the children to look for important words or phrases from the scriptures and teachings of latter-day prophets that could complete the statement.

Make a List

Have children search the scriptures and teachings of latterday prophets and then make a list of what they have learned about the doctrine.

HELPING CHILDREN SHARE THE DOCTRINE


Have the children personalize their commitment by writing a way to follow Jesus in their own footstep or writing a way to serve others in their own handprint.
Have the children pass an object around the room as they sing. Randomly stop the music. Whoever is holding the object shares an application. This will keep everyone thinking of an application they might share.

Trace Feet or Hands

Music Games

Make a Spinner Game

Ask the child to come up with a related application to whatever the spinner points to.

Dramatizations

Have some of the children role-play an application of the doctrine, and the rest of the children guess what they are doing.

Teach Each Other

Let individuals or groups discuss applications. Then let them share what they discussed with the rest of the Primary.

Visual Reminders

Make a paper chain. Make road signs. Make class banners. Make salt dough figures. Draw a picture. Make bookmarks.

AGE CHARACTERISTICS OF CHILDREN


Children are continually changing physically, mentally,

socially, emotionally, and spiritually. They follow a


general pattern of growth and development. Parents and teachers who are aware of common characteristics of different age-groups will be able to deal with childrens behavior more appropriately and teach them more effectively Church lesson manuals have been prepared with childrens growth characteristics in mind. As you study and prepare each lesson, be aware of how each part of the lesson can help you meet the childrens needs. Regardless of the age-group you teach, make sure you are patient, respectful, loving, and sensitive toward each child. Do not expect children to do more than they are able.

RESOURCES
Lesson Manual Gospel Art Book Websites:
www.lds.org/children/resources www.sugardoodle.net www.jennysmith.net/primary/primary-links.php www.ldscoloringpages.net www.scriptures4kids.com

Lead me, guide me, walk beside me,


Help me find the way.

REACHING THE ONE

PRESIDENT THOMAS S. MONSON


I encourage you to reach out to those you serve and to love them. True happiness and lasting joy will come to you and to each one you serve as you take a hand and reach a heart.

LOVE THOSE YOU TEACH

R E AC H I N G O U T W H E N YO U MEET TOGETHER
Even when you teach many people at the same time, you can reach out to individuals. You can greet each child warmly at the beginning of class.

Make participation inviting and safe.


Plan special reports, musical numbers, or discussion questions that will recognize and draw on the talents of particular children. Make a special effort to acknowledge each childs comments and, if possible, make the comments part of class discussions.

R E AC H I N G O U T AT OTHER TIMES
Search for ways to reach out to those you teach. The things you do for people outside the teaching setting can make a profound difference in their attitude toward studying the gospel. Go out of your way to talk with class members when you see them (in the halls, at the store, etc.). Encourage and help them in times of trial. Remember important events in their lives. Visit their homes. Attend activities in which they participate.

Teach me all that I must do


To live with Him someday.

YOUR CALLING

A L L T H Y C H I L D R E N S H A L L B E T A U G H T O F THE LORD; AND GREAT SHALL BE THE PEACE OF THY CHILD REN (3 N EPHI 22:13)