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Dance of the Realm

from Gerald Jonas’ Dancing
Prepared by Dr. Kay Picart
Edited by Jessica Labbé and Dr. Kay Picart

Review Question:
According to Jonas, what is the link between dance and class/rank?

Review Question:
What is the link between the social construction of gender and dance? Give examples.

Review Question:
Where does the use of dance as an instrument of political power have its roots?

Raphael’s Galatea

Review Question:
According to Jonas, what was the key to success at court?

Review Question:
Name and describe the early court dances.

Discussion Questions:
How would you characterize the evolution of court dancing? Do you think evidence of these early dances can still be seen in popular dance of the 20th-21st Century?
Portrait of Louis XIV

Review Questions:

What King differentiated between amateur and professional dance? Why did he do this?

Review Question:
What is dwo?

Review Question:
What are the origins and symbolism of the Bedoyo?

Review Questions:

What do the movements of the Bedoyo symbolize?
What is the essence of this dance?

Review Question:
What are the two “radically different styles of male dancing” (91) found in the wayang wong?

http://www.joglosemar.co.id/wayangwong.html

Discussion Question:
What is the paradox of Javanese dance?

Discussion Questions:
Is a clash between the traditional and the modern inevitable? Can/should they be reconciled?

Review Questions:
What is the relationship between gagaku and bugaku?

What is bugaku and what does it signify?

Bugako dancer’s Ryoto costume http://nimbus.temple.edu/~kotsuki/bugaku.html

Final Remarks
Courts come into existence as instruments of political, military, spiritual & cultural authority. Their primary purpose is to manifest power. In its administrative structure & content, court dance embodies hierarchy. (107)

Final Remarks
Court and court dances are expensive, & ultimately it is the people who pay the bills. Where court forms, like ballet and bedoyo, are encouraged to migrate outside the court, new participants, spectators, & patrons become involved. (107)

Final Remarks
The power of dance to communicate the past glories of a community—and by so doing—bind the present community closer, is expressed by Professor Opoku:

Conclusion
“When you hear the drums, it sweetens the inside of your head, as we say in the Asante language, like sugar, and you become aware that you belong to a great people.” (107)

Concluding Questions:
Does dance still establish political and social hierarchies?

Do you think dance that is entwined with political aims is not “true dance”?