Session 34

Nonterm Academic Calendars
and Delivering Title IV Aid
Fred Sellers
Office of Postsecondary Education
December 9, 2004

Overview
Session Agenda  Overview  Getting Started  Program Requirements  Case Studies  Additional Handouts  Toolbox  Additional Case Studies

2

Overview

Focus  Nonterm educational programs  Federal Pell Grant Program  Loan Programs: FFEL and DL  Determination of payment amounts  Disbursement dates
3

Overview
Engaging the Nontraditional  Expectations  Frustrations  Help

4

Getting Started

5

Getting Started
For Each Academic Program
     Academic calendar Program’s weeks of instructional time Definitions for Title IV Payment periods Loan periods

6

Term and Nonterm
A Term  Definition: A discrete period of time during which all courses in the term are scheduled to begin and end  Within a term: full-length courses, compressed courses or modules, courses offered sequentially

7

Term and Nonterm

Academic calendar no longer term-based  All classes do not start and stop within the beginning and end dates of the term.

8

Term and Nonterm
Nonterm Programs  Courses do not all begin and end within a discrete period of time and may—
Contain self-paced or independent study courses without fixed timeframes; or Consist of sequential courses that do not have to begin and end within a term.

 Clock-hour programs are always treated as nonterm.

9

Case Study #1
5 weeks 4 hours 5 weeks 4 hours 5 weeks 4 hours 5 weeks 4 hours 5 weeks 4 hours

Term and Nonterm
5 weeks 4 hours

 A certificate program consists of 6 courses or modules, each 5 weeks of instructional time in length with 4 semester hours in each module.  Is this program a nonterm or term-based program?
Nonterm? 2 semesters? 3 10-week nonstandard terms? 6 5-week nonstandard terms? Some other combination of modules into terms?
10

Case Study #2
3 hours 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours

Term and Nonterm
3 hours

 A bachelor’s degree program consists of 3 semesterhour courses that students may start and complete at their own pace without any requirement that a student complete a course or group of courses within a specified time-frame.  Is this program a nonterm or term-based program?

11

Case Study #3
Fall Session A – 15 weeks Session C – 11 weeks S. F – 8 weeks

Term and Nonterm
Spring Session B – 15 weeks Session E – 11 weeks S. I – 8 weeks

Session D – 11 weeks S. H – 8 weeks

S. G – 8 weeks

 If a student is able to register at the same time for classes for his or her educational program in any of these sessions, is it a term-based program?  Can there be an academic calendar that is term-based with courses offered in these sessions?

12

Case Study #4
Fall Session A – 15 weeks S. C – 8 weeks S. D – 8 weeks S. G – 5 w S. H – 5 w S. I – 5 w S. J – 5 w

Term and Nonterm
Spring Session B – 15 weeks S. E – 8 weeks S. F – 8 weeks S. K – 5 w S. L – 5 w

 If a student is able to register at the same time for classes in any of these sessions for his or her educational program, is it a term-based program?  Can there be an academic calendar that is term-based with courses offered in these sessions?

13

Nonterm

Academic Progress  Progress is measured by the number of credit hours or clock hours successfully completed. Payment Period  Payment periods are divisions of the academic program based on hours and, if credit hours, weeks of instructional time.

14

Nonterm
Enrollment Status

   

Full-time = academic year definition for credit hour programs Full-time = at least 24 clock hours per calendar week Still need to determine the rate at which a student is completing a program, for example, at least half-time. Must make this determination for programs less than an academic year in length. Students in these programs are not automatically considered full-time.
15

Program Requirements

16

Program Requirements
Federal Pell Grant Program  Scheduled award  Annual award  Payment period  Pell formulas

17

Program Requirements
Loan Programs - FFEL and DL Consider
Academic year Payment periods Weeks of instructional time Calendar time Credit or clock hours

May determine
Loan period Delivery of proceeds Loan maximums

18

Nonterm
Enrollment Status  Pell Full-time students’ progress in the program for all payment period calculations Less-than-half-time for cost of attendance Loans Full-time students’ progress in the program can affect loan period calendar-time length Less-than-half-time for determining eligibility
19

Nonterm

Pell Formula  Pell formula 4 must be used.

20

Nonterm
FFEL and DL - Loan Period  The minimum loan period is the lesser of—
The academic year, or The length of the program.

 If an educational program is greater than an academic year in length, the remaining portion of the student’s program that is less than an academic year in length may be a loan period.  A loan period may not exceed 12 calendar months.

21

Nonterm
FFEL and DL - Delivery  The school may not deliver the second half of the loan proceeds until the later of—
The calendar midpoint between the first and last scheduled days of the loan period; or The date that the student has completed half of the academic coursework in the loan period.

22

Case Study #1
23

Case Study #1

 Illustrates determining Pell and loans for a nonterm self-paced, credit-hour program  Also illustrates-Impact of completing coursework ahead of scheduled completion Impact of overlapping loan period for a transfer student

24

Case Study #1
3 hours 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours

 Academic calendar = nonterm, 120 semester hours, self-paced  Academic year = 24 semester hours and 40 weeks of instructional time  Full-time = 24 semester hours over 40 weeks of instructional time
25

Case Study #1
12 semester hours 20 weeks 12 semester hours 20 weeks

 Payment period = 12 semester hours and 20 weeks of instructional time.  Most full-time students are completing the hours in the defined academic year in 40 weeks of instructional time.

26

Case Study #1 Pell
12 semester hours 20 weeks 12 semester hours 20 weeks

 Formula 4 Pell payment for a payment period calculation
Step 1 Determining a student’s Scheduled Award

27

Case Study #1 Pell
12 semester hours 20 weeks Step 2 Multiplying the Scheduled Award by the lesser of either “one” or the following fraction: The number of weeks of instructional time required for a full-time student to complete the lesser of the clock or credit hours in the program or the academic year The number of weeks of instructional time in the program’s academic year
28

12 semester hours 20 weeks

Case Study #1 Pell
12 semester hours 20 weeks Step 3 The result of Step 2 multiplied by: The number of credit or clock hours in a payment period = The number of credit or clock hours in the program’s academic year payment for a payment period 12 semester hours 20 weeks

29

Case Study #1 Pell
12 semester hours 20 weeks 12 semester hours 20 weeks

 Student with a Scheduled Award of $4,000  Payment for a payment period calculation
Step 1 Scheduled Award = $4,000 Step 2 40 40 $4,000 = $4,000

30

Case Study #1 Pell
12 semester hours 20 weeks 12 semester hours 20 weeks

Step 3 12 24 $4,000 = $2,000

31

Case Study #1 Pell
12 semester hours 20 weeks 12 semester hours 20 weeks

Start date 1st Pell disbursement

Week 15

Week 20 2nd Pell disbursement

 Student completes the first 12 semester hours in 15 weeks of instructional time.  School may disburse second Pell only after the student completes 20 weeks of instructional time.
32

Case Study #1 Loans
12 semester hours 20 weeks
Start date

12 semester hours 20 weeks
End date

 The loan period is based on using a borrowerbased academic year (BBAY).  The loan period is the calendar-time period in which the student is expected to complete an academic year.
33

Case Study #1 Loans
loan period before transfer 12 semester hours 20 weeks
Start date

12 semester hours 20 weeks
End date

Week 15

Week 20

 As a transfer student with an overlapping loan period from the prior enrollment, the student is eligible for an amount determined by subtracting the gross amount received at the prior institution from the loan limit for the new loan.  Since the program must use BBAY, the institution must certify the reduced loan amount for an academic year.
34

Case Study #1 Loans
12 semester hours 20 weeks 12 semester hours 20 weeks
End date

Start date 1st loan disbursement

Week 15

Week 20 Midpoint 2nd loan disbursement

 The calendar midpoint of the loan period is at the end of the 20th week of instructional time.  The school may deliver the second loan disbursement after the calendar midpoint of the loan period.

35

Case Study #1 Pell and Loans
12 semester hours 20 weeks 12 semester hours 20 weeks
End date

Start date 1st Pell disbursement 1st loan disbursement

Week 15

Week 20 2nd Pell disbursement Midpoint 2nd loan disbursement

 Pell and loan disbursements coincide.

36

Case Study #2
37

Case Study #2

 Illustrates determining Pell and loans for a nonterm, credit-hour program with a fixed schedule  Also illustrates-Program less than an academic year based on only one measure Impact of compressed coursework in a program less than an academic year in length Impact of failing a course on progressing to the next payment period and to a loan disbursement

38

Case Study #2
28 semester hours 28 weeks of instructional time

  

An undergraduate certificate program. The program is not self-paced. Students earn 28 semester hours over 28 weeks of instructional time. Students earn semester hours in 2-hour increments.
39

Case Study #2
28 semester hours 28 weeks of instructional time

 Academic year = 24 semester hours and 30 weeks of instructional time  Full-time = 24 semester hours over 30 weeks of instructional time

40

Case Study #2
14 hours 14 weeks 14 hours 14 weeks

 Payment periods = 14 semester hours and 14 weeks of instructional time

41

Case Study #2 Pell
14 hours 14 weeks 14 hours 14 weeks

 Formula 4 for Pell payment for a payment period calculation  Student with a Scheduled Award of $4,000

42

Case Study #2 Pell
14 hours 14 weeks 14 hours 14 weeks

 For Pell full-time students are completing the hours in the academic year in 24 weeks of instructional time.
24/28 28 = 24 weeks of instructional time for most full-time students to complete the hours in the program
43

hours in academic year hours in the program

Case Study #2 Pell
14 hours 14 weeks 14 hours 14 weeks

 Payment for a payment period calculation for each payment period in the program
Step 1 Scheduled Award Step 2 24 30 Step 3 14 24 $3,200 = $1,866.66 ($1,867 and $1,866 for each p.p.) $4,000 = $3,200 = $4,000

44

Case Study #2 Pell
14 hours 14 weeks 14 hours 14 weeks

Start date 1st Pell disbursement

2nd Pell disbursement

 The student receives two Pell disbursements that total $3,733 out of a $4,000 Scheduled Award.

45

Case Study #2 Loans
14 hours 14 weeks Midpoint 14 hours 14 weeks

1st loan disbursement

2nd loan disbursement

 The loan period is for the program which is less than an academic year in length.  The institution must prorate the loan limit for the loan by 28/30, the lesser of
wks in program (28)/wks in ac yr (30) or hrs in program (28)/hrs in ac yr (24)
46

Case Study #2 Pell and Loans
14 hours 14 weeks Midpoint 2nd Pell
disbursement

14 hours 14 weeks

Start date 1st Pell disbursement

1st loan disbursement

2nd loan disbursement

 Pell and loan disbursements coincide.

47

Expected end of p.p. and midpoint

Case Study #2 Pell and Loans
14 hours 14 weeks

14 hours 14 weeks Midpoint

Start date 1st Pell disbursement

2nd Pell disbursement

Calendar end date of loan period

1st loan disbursement

2nd loan disbursement

 Assume our student fails a two-hour course in the first payment period.  The institution may not disburse the student’s 2nd Pell and loan disbursements until the student has successfully completed 14 hours.
48

Case Study #3
49

Case Study #3

 Illustrates determining Pell and loans for a nonterm, credit-hour program with a fixed schedule  Also illustrates-Program greater than an academic year in length Credit-hour/clock-hour conversion Impact of compressed coursework Impact of alternate definition of academic year

50

Case Study #3
24 hours 30 weeks 24 hours 20 weeks

48 semester hours 50 weeks of instructional time

 

An undergraduate certificate program at an institution that offers certificates and associate degrees. The program is not self-paced. Students earn 24 semester hours over the first 30 weeks of instructional time. The remaining 24 hours are earned in the last 20 weeks of instructional time.

51

Case Study #3
48 semester hours 50 weeks of instructional time

 Credit-hour/Clock-hour conversion
Program is subject to conversion because one of the courses is not acceptable as full credit toward an associate degree at the institution. The program has 1440 clock hours of instruction and qualifies for 48 semester hours.

 Reminders
Must continue to offer the program with the 1440 clock hours that make up the 48 semester hours Must provide that upon completing the program’s credit hours the student has also completed all academic requirements including any required seat time and receives certificate after completing credit hours
52

Case Study #3
48 semester hours 50 weeks of instructional time

 Academic year = 24 semester hours and 30 weeks of instructional time  Full-time = 24 semester hours over 30 weeks of instructional time

53

Case Study #3
12 hours 15 weeks 12 hours 15 weeks 12 hours 10 weeks 12 hours 10 weeks

 Payment periods =
Two payment periods = 12 semester hours and 15 weeks of instructional time Two payment periods = 12 semester hours and 10 weeks of instructional time

54

Case Study #3 Pell
12 hours 15 weeks 12 hours 15 weeks 12 hours 10 weeks 12 hours 10 weeks

 Formula 4 for Pell payment for a payment period calculation  Student with a Scheduled Award of $4,000

55

Case Study #3 Pell
12 hours 15 weeks 12 hours 15 weeks 12 hours 10 weeks 12 hours 10 weeks

 For Pell full-time students are completing the hours in the academic year in 25 weeks of instructional time.
24/48 50 = 25 weeks of instructional time for most full-time students to complete the hours in the program
56

hours in academic year hours in the program

Case Study #3 Pell
12 hours 15 weeks 12 hours 15 weeks 12 hours 10 weeks 12 hours 10 weeks

 Payment for a payment period calculation for each payment period in the program
Step 1 Scheduled Award Step 2 25 30 Step 3 12 24 $3,333 = $1,667 ($1,666 for second p.p.) $4,000 = $3,333 = $4,000

57

Case Study #3 Pell
12 hours 15 weeks 12 hours 15 weeks 12 hours 10 weeks 12 hours 10 weeks

Start date 1st Pell disbursement

2nd Pell disbursement

3rd Pell disbursement

4th Pell disbursement

 Assuming that the last two payment periods are in a new award year with the same Scheduled Award, the student would receive $3,333 in each award year for a total of $6,666.

58

Case Study #3 Loans
12 hours 15 weeks 12 hours 15 weeks 12 hours 10 weeks 12 hours 10 weeks

1st loan, 1st disbursement

MidMidpoint 1st loan, point 2nd loan, 2nd loan, 2nd disbursement 1st disbursement 2nd disbursement

 The first loan period is for an academic year.  The remaining balance of the program is for less than an academic year, 24 semester hours and 20 weeks. The institution must prorate the loan limit for the second loan by the hours remaining divided by the hours in the academic year: 24/24
59

Case Study #3 Pell and Loans
12 hours 15 weeks Midpoint 12 hours 15 weeks 12 hours 10 weeks 12 hours 10 weeks

1st loan, 1st disbursement

Start date 1st Pell disbursement

2nd Pell disbursement

3rd Pell disbursement

Midpoint 4th Pell
disbursement

1st loan, 2nd disbursement

2nd loan, 1st disbursement

2nd loan, 2nd disbursement

 Pell and loan disbursements coincide.

60

Alternate Case Study #3
48 semester hours 50 weeks of instructional time

 Academic year = 28 semester hours and 30 weeks of instructional time  Full-time = 28 semester hours over 30 weeks of instructional time

61

Alternate Case Study #3
14 hours 15 weeks 14 hours 15 weeks 10 hours 10 weeks 10 hours 10 weeks

 Payment periods =
Two payment periods = 14 semester hours and 15 weeks of instructional time Two payment periods = 10 semester hours and 10 weeks of instructional time

62

Alternate Case Study #3 Pell
14 hours 15 weeks 14 hours 15 weeks 10 hours 10 weeks 10 hours 10 weeks

 Formula 4 for Pell payment for a payment period calculation  Student with a Scheduled Award of $4,000

63

Alternate Case Study #3 Pell
14 hours 15 weeks 14 hours 15 weeks 10 hours 10 weeks 10 hours 10 weeks

 For Pell full-time students are completing the hours in the academic year in 30 weeks of instructional time.
28/48 50 = 29.166 (must round up any fraction) weeks of instructional time for most full-time students to complete the hours in the program
64

hours in academic year hours in the program

Alternate Case Study #3 Pell
14 hours 15 weeks 14 hours 15 weeks 10 hours 10 weeks 10 hours 10 weeks

 Payment for a payment period calculation for the first two payment periods in the program
Step 1 Scheduled Award Step 2 30 30 Step 3 14 28 $4,000 = $2,000
65

= $4,000

$4,000 = $4,000

Alternate Case Study #3 Pell
14 hours 15 weeks 14 hours 15 weeks 10 hours 10 weeks 10 hours 10 weeks

 Payment for a payment period calculation for the last two payment periods in the program
Step 1 Scheduled Award Step 2 30 30 Step 3 10 28 $4,000 = $1,429 ($1,428 for second p.p.) $4,000 = $4,000 = $4,000

66

Alternate Case Study #3 Pell
14 hours 15 weeks 14 hours 15 weeks 10 hours 10 weeks 10 hours 10 weeks

Start date 1st Pell disbursement

2nd Pell disbursement after the 16th week

3rd Pell disbursement after the 32nd week

4th Pell disbursement after the 41st week

 The student needs to attend 32 weeks to earn 28 semester hours and completes 38 hours at the 41st week.  Assuming that the last two payment periods are in a new award year with the same Scheduled Award, the student would receive $4,000 in the first award year and $2,857 for a total of $6,857.
67

Alternate Case Study #3 Loans
14 hours 15 weeks 14 hours 15 weeks 10 hours 10 weeks 10 hours 10 weeks

1st loan, 1st disbursement

MidMidpoint 1st loan, 2nd loan, point 2nd loan, 2nd disbursement 1st disbursement 2nd disbursement

 The first loan period is for at least an academic year, i.e., 28 semester hours and 30 weeks of instructional time. A student must attend 32 weeks to earn 28 semester hours. The loan period is for the calendar time to complete 32 weeks and 28 semester hours.  Second loan period is for the remaining portion of the program.
68

Alternate Case Study #3 Loans
14 hours 15 weeks 14 hours 15 weeks 10 hours 10 weeks 10 hours 10 weeks

1st loan, 1st disbursement

MidMidpoint 1st loan, 2nd loan, point 2nd loan, 2nd disbursement 1st disbursement 2nd disbursement

 The remaining balance of the program is for less than an academic year, 20 semester hours and 18 weeks of instructional time. The institution must prorate the loan limit for the second loan by the hours remaining divided by the hours in the academic year. 20/28
69

Alternate Case Study #3 Pell and Loans
14 hours 15 weeks Midpoint 14 hours 15 weeks 10 hours 10 weeks Midpoint 10 hours 10 weeks

Start date 1st Pell disbursement

2 Pell disbursement
nd

3rd Pell disbursement

4th Pell disbursement

1st loan, 1st disbursement

1st loan, 2nd disbursement

2nd loan, 1st disbursement

2nd loan, 2nd disbursement

 Pell and loan disbursements coincide but are shifted to later points in the program.  The revised academic year definition of Alternate Case Study #3 maximizes Pell eligibility over loan eligibility.
70

Contact Information Fred Sellers
(202) 502-7502 fred.sellers@ed.gov
OR

Jacquelyn Butler
(202) 502-7890 jacquelyn.butler@ed.gov

71

Toolbox

72

Getting Started

73

Getting Started
For Each Academic Program  Determine academic calendar
Term using credit hours
– Standard Term – Nonstandard Term

Nonterm credit hour Clock hour – term and nonterm

 Determine weeks of instructional time (defined in subsequent section)
Not same as calendar time

74

Getting Started
For Each Academic Program  Define for Title IV
Academic year Weeks of instructional time Hours (for undergraduate) – clock or credit Full-time for terms or program

75

Getting Started
For Each Academic Program  Identify the payment periods
Terms using credit hours Nonterm with credit hours Clock-hours

Regulations: 34 CFR 668.4

76

Getting Started
For Each Academic Program  Determine loan periods with terms as payment periods
Standard-term programs Nonstandard-term programs with terms substantially equal in length (all terms within two weeks of instructional time in length)

 Determine loan periods without payment periods
Nonstandard-term programs with terms unequal in length Nonterm credit-hour programs Clock-hour programs

Regulations: 34 CFR 682.604; 685.301

77

Week of Instructional Time

78

Week of Instructional Time
Recent Regulatory Changes – Academic Year  November 1, 2002 regulations  Academic year = at least:
30 weeks of instructional time, and If an undergraduate program, 24 semester hours, 36 quarter hours, or 900 clock hours

 Revised definition of a week of instructional time  Elimination of 12-hour rule
79

Week of Instructional Time
Recent Regulatory Changes – Weeks  A “week of instructional time” (for all programs) = 7 consecutive days in which at least one day of regularly scheduled instruction, examinations, or preparation for examinations occurs  Instructional time ≠ periods of orientation, counseling, vacation, or other activity not related to class preparation or examination

Regulations: 34 CFR 668.3(b)

80

Term and Nonterm Academic Calendars

81

Term and Nonterm
A Term  Definition: A discrete period of time during which all courses in the term are scheduled to begin and end  Within a term: full-length courses, compressed courses or modules, courses offered sequentially

82

Term and Nonterm
Academic calendar no longer term-based

 All classes do not start and stop within the beginning and end dates of the term.

83

Term and Nonterm
Standard Term

 A traditional semester, quarter, or trimester  Academic progress: always measured in semester or quarter credit hours

84

Term and Nonterm
Standard Term - Semesters and Trimesters  Length: approximately 15 weeks of instructional time  Academic progress: measured in semester hours  Full-time: at least 12 semester hours  Academic calendar: usually 3 terms - fall, spring, and often summer
85

Standard Term – Quarters time

Term and Nonterm

 Length: approximately 10-12 weeks of instructional

 Academic progress: measured in quarter hours  Full-time: at least 12 quarter hours  Academic calendar: usually 3 quarters in fall, winter, and spring and often a summer quarter

86

Term and Nonterm
Nonstandard Term  Does not meet requirements for a standard term  For example, may be the length of a standard term but academic progress not measured with the appropriate credit hours such as a quarter using semester hours

87

Term and Nonterm
Nonterm Programs  Courses do not all begin and end within a discrete period of time and may—
Contain self-paced or independent study courses without fixed timeframes; or Consist of sequential courses that do not have to begin and end within a term.

 Clock-hour programs are always treated as nonterm.
88

Nonterm Payment Periods

89

Payment Period Definition
Recent Regulatory Changes – Payment Period  For nonterm credit-hour programs:
Added weeks of instructional time in addition to hours

 For clock-hour programs:
Continue only to use hours

90

Payment Periods for Nonterm Programs

Payment Period Definition

 A program one academic year or less in length
(if one measure is equal to or less than an academic year) First payment period, the first half of The hours in the program, and If a credit-hour program, the weeks of instructional time in the program Second payment period, the second half of The hours in the program, and If a credit-hour program, the weeks of instructional time in the program
Regulations: 34 CFR 668.4(b)(1)
91

Payment Period Definition
Payment Periods for Nonterm Programs  A program with more than one academic year, the first academic year and any subsequent full academic year
First payment period, first half of The hours in the academic year, and If a credit-hour program, the weeks of instructional time in the academic year Second payment period, the second half of The hours in the academic year, and If a credit-hour program, the weeks of instructional time in the academic year
Regulations: 34 CFR 668.4(b)(2)

92

Payment Periods for Nonterm Programs

Payment Period Definition

 Remainder of a program more than one-half an academic year (both measures), but less than a complete academic year (one or both measures), in length
First payment period, the first half of The remaining hours in the program, and If a credit-hour program, the remaining weeks of instructional time in the program Second payment period, the second half of The remaining hours in the program, and If a credit-hour program, the remaining weeks of instructional time in the program
Regulations: 34 CFR 668.4(b)(2)(ii)
93

Payment Period Definition
Payment Periods for Nonterm Programs

 For the remainder of a program not more than half an academic year in length (one or both measures)
The payment period is the remainder of that program.

Regulations: 34 CFR 668.4(b)(2)(iii)

94

Enrollment Status

95

Enrollment Status
Standard Terms Status Full-time Three-quarter-time Half-time Less-than-half-time Minimum hours 12 credit hours per term 9 credit hours per term 6 credit hours per term Less than half the workload of the minimum full-time requirement
96

Regulations: 34 CFR 690.2(c)

Enrollment Status
Nonstandard term Step 1 Full-time
Credit hours in the academic year Weeks of instructional time in the term Weeks of instructional time in program’s definition of academic year

Step 2 Determining less-than-full-time enrollment status
Credit hours taken by student in the term
Regulations: 34 CFR 690.63(d)(ii)

÷

Credit hours required for full-time status for the term (as determined above)

97

Enrollment Status
Nonterm

 Full-time equals defined academic year, i.e., attends the hours of the academic year in the weeks of instructional time of the academic year.

Regulations: 34 CFR 668.2(b)

98

Enrollment Status
Recalculation of enrollment status for term-based programs  Pell
Must recalculate if student does not begin attendance in all classes or if making a lump-sum disbursement for work completed in prior payment periods with no disbursements. May have a policy of recalculating for changes in enrollment status for a term; if adopt policy, must apply to both increases and decreases

 Loans
Are not required to recalculate loan need based on a change in enrollment status after loan certification May not deliver undisbursed proceeds if the student drops below half-time
Regulations: 34 CFR 682.604; 685.303; 690.76(b) and 690.80(b)
99

Pell and Loan Basic Requirements

100

Program Requirements
Federal Pell Grant Program  Use Scheduled Award as basis for student’s Pell for an award year  Calculate payments of a student’s award by payment period  Disburse payments by payment period

Regulations: 34 CFR 668.164(b); 690.2(c), 690.62, and 690.63

101

Program Requirements
Pell Formulas  Calculate payments for payment periods  Award a grant “evenly” across defined academic year – both measures  Consider weeks then hours in determining payments for payment periods  Encourage educational programs offered in reasonable timeframes
102

Program Requirements
Pell Formulas 1 & 2 Standard term – traditional school calendars 3 Any term-based credit-hour program 4 Clock-hour and nonterm credit-hour programs 5 Correspondence programs

Regulations: 34 CFR 690.63

103

Program Requirements
Loan Programs - FFEL and DL: loan periods  Award loans based on loan periods.

 Scheduled Academic Year: traditional-calendar
standard-term programs may use.  Borrower-based Academic Year: all others must use.

104

Program Requirements
Loan Programs - FFEL and DL: payment amounts  Traditional standard term programs and credit-hour programs with terms substantially equal in length
Divide loan proceeds evenly by the payment periods (the terms) in the loan period unless a single term is a loan period.

Clock-hour programs, nonterm credit-hour programs, or programs with unequal nonstandard terms
Schedule loan proceeds to be disbursed in substantially equal disbursements

Regulations: 34 CFR 682.604(c); 685.301

105

Program Requirements
Loan Programs - FFEL and DL: delivery  Traditional standard term programs and credithour programs with terms substantially equal in length
If a loan period is more than one payment period, deliver loan proceeds at least once in each payment period. If a loan period is one payment period, must be at least two deliveries of loan proceeds during that payment period. No second delivery until the calendar midpoint between the first and last scheduled days of class of the loan period.
Regulations: 34 CFR 682.604(c); 685.301

106

Program Requirements
Loan Programs - FFEL and DL: delivery  Clock-hour programs, nonterm credit-hour programs, or programs with unequal nonstandard terms
Deliver no more than one-half of loan until student reaches (1) the calendar midpoint between the first and last scheduled days of the loan period, and (2) completes half the coursework of the loan period

107

Program Requirements

Loan Programs - FFEL and DL: delivery

30-calendar-day delay of the first disbursement for first-time, first-year undergraduate borrower

108

Additional Case Studies

109

Additional Case #1

Points Illustrated  A program of standard terms in a nonstandard academic calendar  Multiple Pell disbursements for a term greater than half an academic year in length  Pell and loan disbursements at different times

110

Additional Case #1
Example – nontraditional semester program

16 weeks

15 weeks

 A two-semester certificate program.  The first term has 16 weeks of instructional time, and the second term has 15 weeks of instructional time.  A new cohort of students starts on the first weekday of each month.
111

Additional Case #1
Example – nontraditional semester program
16 weeks 15 weeks

 Academic year = 24 semester hours and 30 weeks of instructional time  Full-time = 12 semester hours

112

Additional Case #1
Example – nontraditional semester program Pell Formula  No formula 1 or 2 – because the program does not follow the traditional academic calendar of fall and spring terms and a summer session and because the terms of the cohorts of students overlap  Pell formula 3 – nontraditional calendars must use

113

Additional Case #1
Example – nontraditional semester program
12 hours 16 weeks 12 hours 15 weeks

 Student enrolls for 12 semester hours in each term.  Student has $1,000 Pell Scheduled Award.

114

Additional Case #1
Example – nontraditional semester program
12 hours 16 weeks
Start date Week 16 1st Pell disbursement

12 hours 15 weeks
2nd 2nd term Pell disb. 3rd Pell disbursement

Payment for a payment period (formula 3)
First term
16/30 × Scheduled Award (1st term) $533 – at least two disbursements required: $500 and $33 Second term 15/30 × Scheduled Award (2nd term) $500 – disburse only $467 of Scheduled Award remaining
115

Additional Case #1
Example – nontraditional semester program
12 hours 16 weeks
Start date 1st Loan disbursement 2nd term 2nd Loan disbursement

12 hours 15 weeks

 

Loan period = two terms (a loan period greater than an academic year One-half of loan proceeds for each term
116

Additional Case #1
Example – nontraditional semester program
12 hours - only begins 6 hours 16 weeks
Start date 1st Pell disbursement 1st Loan disbursement Week 16 2nd Pell disbursement

12 hours 15 weeks
2nd term 3rd Pell disbursement 2nd Loan disbursement

 Pell and loan disbursements do not all coincide.  Pell disbursements are unequal.

117

Additional Case #2
Points Illustrated  Clock-hour example  Payment periods only in clock hours  Determination of weeks of instructional time to complete the hours in the defined academic year  Reduced Pell disbursement to assure do not exceed Scheduled Award  Calendar midpoint drives 2nd loan disbursement  Options on loan periods
118

Additional Case #2
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program  Academic calendar = 1200 clock hours over 30 weeks of instructional time  Academic year = 900 clock hours and 30 weeks of instructional time  Full-time = 24 clock hours per week of instructional time  Pell Scheduled Award = $1,000
119

Additional Case #2
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program

450 clock hours

450 clock hours

300 clock hours

 Payment periods = 450 clock hours, 450 clock hours, and 300 clock hours  Loan period must be for the program.

120

Additional Case #2
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program  Program is not self-paced.  For Pell full-time students are completing the hours in the academic year in 23 weeks of instructional time.
900/1200 30 = 23 (22.5 rounded up) weeks of instructional time in the program
121

hours in academic year hours in the program

Additional Case #2
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program  Payment for a payment period calculation for first two payment periods
Step 1 Scheduled Award Step 2 23 30 Step 3 450 900 $766.66 = $383.33 $1,000 = $766.66 = $1,000

122

Additional Case #2
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program  Payment for a payment period calculation for third payment period
Step 1 Scheduled Award Step 2 23 30 Step 3 300 900 $766.66 = $255.56 $1,000 = $766.66 = $1,000

123

Additional Case #2
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program
450 clock hours
1st Pell Disbursement 1st loan disbursement

450 clock hours

300 clock hours

2nd Pell 2nd loan disbursement disbursement

3rd Pell disbursement

Second Pell disbursement after student completes 450 clock hours, and third disbursement after 900 clock hours. If in same award year, Pell third disbursement is reduced to $233.34. Second loan disbursement is after reaching the calendar midpoint and 600 clock hours.

124

Additional Case #3
Points Illustrated  Determination of weeks of instructional time to complete the hours in the defined academic year  Reduced Pell disbursement due to compressed coursework by most full-time students  No Pell disbursement for payment period for final hours of a program for most full-time students  Reduced loan maximum for program completed in less than an academic year
125

Additional Case #3
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program  Academic calendar = nonterm; 30 semester hours; self-paced  Academic year = 24 semester hours and 30 weeks of instructional time  Full-time = 24 semester hours over 30 weeks of instructional time  Pell Scheduled Award = $1,000
126

Additional Case #3
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program

12 hours 15 weeks

12 hours 15 weeks

6 hours 8 weeks

 Payment periods = 2 payment periods of 12 hours and 15 weeks of instructional time  Third payment period = 6 hours and 8 weeks (must impute weeks but are not relevant)
6 (hrs in pp)/24 (hrs in ac yr) X 30 (wks in ac yr) = 7.5 (wks in pp)

127

Additional Case #3
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program  The school reviews the completion time of its full-time students for the prior award year and determines:
1 student completed program in 21 weeks of instructional time, 2 in 23, 4 in 24, 2 in 25, and 1 in 27 weeks. The school averages the student completions: 240 weeks/10 students = 24 weeks of instructional time for most full-time students to complete the program
128

Additional Case #3
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program  The completion time for the program of 24 weeks of instructional time affects both Pell and loans:
For Pell, affects the calculation of payments for a payment period For loans, affects loan period and loan amount.

129

Additional Case #3
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program  For Pell full-time students are completing the hours in the academic year in 20 weeks of instructional time.
24/30 24 = 19.2 (round up to 20) weeks of instructional time for most full-time students to complete the hours in the program
130

hours in academic year hours in the program

Additional Case #3
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program  Pell payment for a payment period calculation for the first two payment periods
Step 1 Step 2 20 30 Step 3 12 24 $666.66 = $333.33 $1,000 = $666.66 Scheduled Award = $1,000

131

Additional Case #3
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program  Pell payment for a payment period calculation for the third payment period
Step 1 Scheduled Award Step 2 20 30 Step 3 6 24 $666.66 = $166.66 $1,000 = $666.66 = $1,000

132

Additional Case #3
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program
12 hours 15 weeks 12 hours 15 weeks 6 hours

1st Pell disbursement

2nd Pell disbursement

3rd Pell disbursement

Second Pell disbursement after student completes 12 semester hours and 15 weeks of instructional time, i.e., the first payment period (1/2 of the defined academic year) No third Pell disbursement for most full-time students as they are completing the program in less than 30 weeks of instructional time
133

Additional Case #3
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program
Calendar time for most full-time students complete 30 hours and 24 weeks of instructional time

12 hours 15 weeks
Midpoint

12 hours 15 weeks

6 hours

Since most full-time students are completing the program in 24 weeks, the loan period must be for the calendar time to complete the program in 24 weeks of instructional time. Only one loan period as program is considered less than an academic year in length for loans.
134

Additional Case #3
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program
Calendar time to complete loan period

12 hours 15 weeks
1st loan disbursement Midpoint

12 hours 15 weeks
2nd loan disbursement

6 hours

Must prorate maximum loan amount by 24/30 (lesser of the wks in program/wks in ac yr or hrs in program/hrs in ac yr). Second loan disbursement is after reaching the calendar midpoint and 15 semester hours (half the hours in the loan period).
135

Additional Case #3
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program
12 hours 15 weeks 12 hours 15 weeks 6 hours

1st Pell disbursement 1st loan disbursement

Midpoint 2nd Pell 2nd loan disbursement disbursement for most full-time students

3rd Pell disbursement

 Pell and loan disbursements do not coincide.

136

Additional Case #4
Points Illustrated  Payment periods and loan period for the remaining portion of a nonterm program  Determination of weeks of instructional time to complete the hours in the defined academic year  Treatment when all students are less-than-full-time  Determination of total Pell disbursements dependent on whether the program is in more than one award year  Affects of failing courses on Pell payments and loan periods
137

Additional Case #4
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program

 Academic calendar = 60 quarter hours over 54 weeks of instructional time; not self-paced  Academic year = 36 quarter hours and 30 weeks of instructional time  Full-time = 36 quarter hours over 30 weeks of instructional time

138

Additional Case #4
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program
5h 5w 5h 5w 5h 5w 5h 5w 5h 5w 5h 5w 10 h 8w
3rd Pell disbursement 40 h, 38 w

10 h 8w

10 h 8w

1st Pell disbursement

2nd Pell disbursement 20 h, 20 w

4th Pell disbursement 50 h, 46 w

Students complete 30 quarter hours in six 5-hour modules each with 5 weeks of instructional time. And complete the second 30 quarter hours in three 8-week modules with 10 quarter hours each. Payment periods = First two = 18 quarter hours and 15 weeks of instructional time Second two = 12 quarter hours and 12 weeks of instructional time
139

Additional Case #4
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program  Program is not self-paced.  For Pell full-time students are completing the hours in the academic year in 30 weeks of instructional time.
36/60 54 = 32.4 (students are less than full-time; use 30 weeks of instructional time in defined academic year) weeks of instructional time in the program

hours in academic year hours in the program

140

Additional Case #4
 Payment for a payment period calculation for first two payment periods
Step 1 Determine Scheduled Award Step 2 30 30 Step 3 18 36 Step 2 = Payment for payment period Scheduled Award = Step 2

141

Additional Case #4
 Payment for a payment period calculation for the last two payment periods
Step 1 Determine Scheduled Award Step 2 30 30 Step 3 12 36 Step 2 = Payment for payment period Scheduled = Step 2 Award

 Payments for the last two payment periods not available unless in a new award year
142

Additional Case #4
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program
5h 5w 5h 5w 5h 5w 5h 5w
Midpoint

5h 5w

5h 5w

10 h 8w

10 h 8w

10 h 8w

1st loan, 1st disbursement

1st loan, 2nd disbursement

2nd loan

First loan period = 38 weeks of instructional time and 40 quarter hours. The borrower-based-academic-year loan period must encompass the academic year definition in weeks and hours and must include the first 10-hour module in the loan period to have at least the 36 quarter hours of the academic year. The second disbursement of the loan may be made after earning the 20 quarter hours of the loan period and passing the calendar midpoint of the loan period.
143

Additional Case #4
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program
5h 5w 5h 5w 5h 5w 5h 5w
Midpoint

5h 5w

5h 5w

10 h 8w

10 h 8w

10 h 8w

1st loan, 1st disbursement

1st loan, 2nd disbursement

Midpoint 2nd loan, 1st 2nd loan, dis2nd disbursement bursement

 Second loan period = remaining balance of the program of 20 hours and 16 weeks of instructional time.  Prorate loan limit by 20/36 (hours in loan period/hours in academic year)
144

Additional Case #4
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program
5h 5w 5h 5w 5h 5w 5h 5w 5h 5w 5h 5w 10 h 8w 10 h 8w 10 h 8w

1st 1st loan, Pell 1st disbursement

2nd Pell 1st loan, 2nd 20 h, 20 w disbursement

3rd Pell 2nd loan, 4th Pell 40 h, 38 w 1st dis50 h, 46 w bursement 2nd loan, 2nd disbursement

 Loan disbursements line up with Pell in this case.

145

Additional Case #4
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program
5h 5w
1st Pell

5h 5w

5h 5w

5h 5w

5h 5w

5h 5w

10 h 8w

10 h 8w

10 h 8w

5h 5w
4th Pell 50 h, 44 w

5h 5w

2nd Pell 20 h, 20 w

3rd Pell 40 h, 36 w

 Student fails two 5-hour classes that are completed at end of program.  Pell payment periods are extended to successfully complete the hours and weeks of each payment period.

146

Additional Case #4
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program
5h 5w 5h 5w 5h 5w 5h 5w
Midpoint

5h 5w

5h 5w

10 h 8w

10 h 8w

10 h 8w

5h 5w

5h 5w

1st loan, 1st disbursement

1st loan, 2nd disbursement

2nd loan

Midpoint 2nd loan, 1st disbursement

2nd loan, 2nd disbursement

Second loan period starts after the first loan period but the first disbursement of the second loan cannot be made until the student has earned the 40 hours in the first loan period at the end of the second 10hour module. Second disbursement of the second loan may be made after the student completes an additional 10 hours at the end of the third 10-hour module and passes the calendar midpoint of the loan period.
147

Additional Case #4
Example – Nonterm Undergraduate Certificate Program
5h 5w 5h 5w 5h 5w 5h 5w
Midpoint

5h 5w

5h 5w

10 h 8w

10 h 8w

10 h 8w

5h 5w

5h 5w

1st loan, 1st disbursement

1st loan, 2nd disbursement

2nd loan

Midpoint 2nd loan, 1st disbursement

2nd loan, 2nd disbursement

 Note that there are no additional costs of attendance because the period of attendance is extended.

148

Additional Case #5

Points Illustrated  No loan proration for graduate program less than an academic year in length  Determining weeks of instructional time  No hours in academic year definition  Twelve-month limit on a loan period

149

Additional Case #5
Example – Nonterm Masters Degree
4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h

 Program =
13 consecutive modules over 15 months Each module = 4 quarter hours 4 consecutive days of attendance each month for the first 12 modules 13th module is a 3-month research project

 Academic year = 30 weeks of instructional time

150

Additional Case #5
Example – Nonterm Masters Degree
4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h

 Weeks of instructional time
4 consecutive days of attendance each month = 2 weeks of instructional time
2 days of 2 days of attendance attendance

7 calendar days

7 calendar days

1 week of 1 week of instructional of instructional 13th module has 3 weekstimeinstructional time. time

151

Additional Case #5
Example – Nonterm Masters Degree
12 calendar months
4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h

3 calendar months
4h

1st loan disbursement

2nd loan disbursement after calendar midpoint

End of loan period

 No loan period can exceed 12 calendar months.  Loan period = 24 weeks of instructional time.  Graduate program, is no proration.

152

Additional Case #5
Example – Nonterm Masters Degree
12 calendar months
4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h 4h

3 calendar months
4h

1st loan disbursement

2nd loan disbursement after calendar midpoint

2nd loan (?)

 FFEL: The remaining period of 3 weeks of instructional time may be shorter than the period for which FFEL lenders and guaranty agencies generally make and guarantee loans.  Direct Loans would accept a new loan.
153

Additional Case #6

Points Illustrated  Potential treatment of loan periods for a nonstandard-term program depending on the academic year definition adopted

154

Additional Case #6
Example – Undergraduate Certificate Program
8 weeks 6 credits 10 weeks 9 credits 9 weeks 3 cr 3 cr 3 cr 10 weeks 9 credits 3 wks 3 cr

 Academic calendar = 40 weeks of instructional time and 36 semester hours offered over 5 nonstandard terms  Must use a borrow-based academic (BBAY) for loans.
155

Additional Case #6
Example – Undergraduate Certificate Program
8 weeks 6 credits 10 weeks 9 credits 9 weeks 3 cr 3 cr 3 cr 10 weeks 9 credits 3 wks 3 cr

 School may define the academic year—
As greater than the minimums to coincide with the end of a term or module (Option 1), or As at least the statutory minimum weeks of instructional time and hours even though they do not coincide with the end of a term or module (Options 2 and 3).

156

Additional Case #6 Option 1
Example – Undergraduate Certificate Program
8 weeks 6 credits
Start of loan period

10 weeks 9 credits

9 weeks 3 cr 3 cr 3 cr

10 weeks 9 credits
End of loan period

3 wks 3 cr

 Option 1: Academic year = 33 semester hours and 37 weeks of instructional time to coincide with the end of a term.  Use BBAY to end of fourth term.
157

Additional Case #6 Option 1
Example – Undergraduate Certificate Program
8 weeks 6 credits
Loan, 1st Disbursement

10 weeks 9 credits

9 weeks 3 cr 3 cr 3 cr
Midpoint Loan, 2nd Disbursement

10 weeks 9 credits
End of loan period

3 wks 3 cr

Second disbursement of the loan cannot be made until the end of the first module of the third term when half the semester hours of the loan period (17 semester hours) have been successfully completed and the loan period calendar midpoint is passed. The remaining balance of the program is generally too short for a second loan to be approved by FFEL lenders and guaranty agencies. DL would approve a prorated loan.

158

Additional Case #6 Options 2 and 3
Example – Undergraduate Certificate Program
8 weeks 6 credits 10 weeks 9 credits 9 weeks 3 cr 3 cr 3 cr 10 weeks 9 credits 3 wks 3 cr

 Options 2 and 3 - If using the minimum measures with an academic year of 24 semester hours and 30 weeks of instructional time, two options for loan periods can be identified.

159

Additional Case #6 Option 2
Example – Undergraduate Certificate Program
8 weeks 6 credits 10 weeks 9 credits 9 weeks 3 cr 3 cr 3 cr 10 weeks 9 credits 3 wks 3 cr

 Option 2 - Academic year = 24 semester hours and 30 weeks of instructional time and does not coincide with the end of a term or module.

160

Additional Case #6 Option 2
Example – Undergraduate Certificate Program
8 weeks 6 credits
Start of loan period

10 weeks 9 credits

9 weeks 3 cr 3 cr 3 cr

10 weeks 9 credits
End of loan period

3 wks 3 cr

 Loan period greater than the defined academic year to coincide with the end of a term or module

161

Additional Case #6 Option 2
Example – Undergraduate Certificate Program
8 weeks 6 credits
Loan, 1st Disbursement

10 weeks 9 credits

9 weeks 3 cr 3 cr 3 cr
Midpoint Loan, 2nd Disbursement

10 weeks 9 credits
End of loan period

3 wks 3 cr

As in Option 1, the second disbursement of the loan cannot be made until the end of the first module of the third term when half the semester hours of the loan period (17 semester hours) have been successfully completed and the loan period calendar midpoint is passed. The remaining balance of the program is generally too short for a second loan to be approved by FFEL lenders and guaranty agencies. DL would approve a prorated loan.
162

Additional Case #6 Option 2
Example – Undergraduate Certificate Program
8 weeks 6 credits
Loan, 1st Disbursement

10 weeks 9 credits

9 weeks 3 cr 3 cr 3 cr
Midpoint Loan, 2nd Disbursement

10 weeks 9 credits
End of loan period

3 wks 3 cr

 By using the minimum allowed defined academic year, Pell payments for a payment period are increased.  By certifying the loan for a period greater than the minimum to coincide with the end of a module, other aspects of program administration such as return of Title IV are simplified.
163

Additional Case #6 Option 3
Example – Undergraduate Certificate Program
8 weeks 6 credits 10 weeks 9 credits 9 weeks 3 cr 3 cr 3 cr 10 weeks 9 credits 3 wks 3 cr

 Option 3 - Academic year = 24 semester hours and 30 weeks of instructional time and does not coincide with the end of a term or module.

164

Additional Case #6 Option 3
Example – Undergraduate Certificate Program
8 weeks 6 credits
Start of 1st loan period

10 weeks 9 credits
Midpoint

9 weeks 3 cr 3 cr 3 cr

10 weeks 9 credits
Week 31 2nd Loan Midpoint

3 wks 3 cr
End of 2nd loan period

 The first loan period is for the academic year, and the second loan period is for the remainder of the program.
165

Additional Case #6 Option 3
Example – Undergraduate Certificate Program
8 weeks 6 credits
Start of 1st loan period

10 weeks 9 credits
Midpoint

9 weeks 3 cr 3 cr 3 cr

10 weeks 9 credits
Week 31 2nd Loan Midpoint

3 wks 3 cr
End of 2nd loan period

 For the second loan period, the loan limit is prorated by the hours remaining in the program compared to the defined academic year: 12/24
166

Additional Case #6 Option 3
Example – Undergraduate Certificate Program
8 weeks 6 credits
Start of 1st loan period

10 weeks 9 credits

9 weeks 3 cr 3 cr 3 cr

10 weeks 9 credits
Week 31 2nd Loan, 1st Disbursement

3 wks 3 cr

Midpoint 1st Loan, 2nd Disbursement

Mid2nd point Loan,

2nd Disbursement

 The second disbursement of the first loan cannot be made until the end of the second term when half the semester hours of the loan period (12 semester hours) have been successfully completed and the loan period calendar midpoint is passed.
167

Additional Case #6 Option 3
Example – Undergraduate Certificate Program
8 weeks 6 credits
Start of 1 loan period
st

10 weeks 9 credits

9 weeks 3 cr 3 cr 3 cr

10 weeks 9 credits

3 wks 3 cr

Midpoint 1st Loan, 2nd Disbursement

2nd Loan, 1st Disbursement

Mid-nd 2 point Loan,

 The second loan would have a first disbursement after the 30th week of instructional time. The second disbursement would be made after the student completes 6 additional hours beyond the first loan period and passed the calendar midpoint of the second loan period.

2nd Disbursement

168

Additional Case #6 Option 3
Example – Undergraduate Certificate Program
8 weeks 6 credits
Start of 1st loan period

10 weeks 9 credits

9 weeks 3 cr 3 cr 3 cr

10 weeks 9 credits

3 wks 3 cr

Midpoint 1st Loan, 2nd Disbursement

2nd Loan, 1st Disbursement

Midpoint nd Loan, 2 2nd Disbursement

Costs to be included in loan periods depends on whether the school charged up-front or by term. In Option 3, if costs are by the term, then the direct costs that are charged in the loan period include the fourth term but not the fifth term in the 1st loan period. The indirect costs for the 1st loan period would be those through the 30th week. If the institution charged up-front, all those costs would be in the first loan period with the indirect costs being through the 30th week for the first loan.

169

Additional Case #6 Option 3
Example – Undergraduate Certificate Program
8 weeks 6 credits
Start of 1st loan period

10 weeks 9 credits

9 weeks 3 cr 3 cr 3 cr

10 weeks 9 credits

3 wks 3 cr

Midpoint 1st Loan, 2nd Disbursement

2nd Loan, 1st Disbursement

Mid-nd 2 point Loan,

2nd Disbursement

 By using the minimum allowed defined academic year, both Pell payments for a payment period and loan amounts are increased.  This option creates complications in other aspects of program administration such as return of Title IV.
170

Additional Case #7

Points Illustrated  Program less than an academic year in length  Determination of weeks for most full-time students to complete the hours in the program  Proration of maximum loan amount

171

Additional Case #7
28 quarter hours 28 weeks of instructional time

  

An undergraduate certificate program. The program is not self-paced. Students earn 28 quarter hours over 28 weeks of instructional time.

172

Additional Case #7
28 semester hours 28 weeks of instructional time

 Academic year = 36 quarter hours and 30 weeks of instructional time  Full-time = 36 quarter hours over 30 weeks of instructional time

173

Additional Case #7
14 hours 14 weeks 14 hours 14 weeks

 Payment periods = 14 quarter hours and 14 weeks of instructional time

174

Additional Case #7 Pell
14 hours 14 weeks 14 hours 14 weeks

 Formula 4 for Pell payment for a payment period calculation  Student with a Scheduled Award of $4,000

175

Additional Case #7 Pell
14 hours 14 weeks 14 hours 14 weeks

 For Pell full-time students are completing the hours in the program in 24 weeks of instructional time.
28/36 30 = 23.33 (round up any fraction) weeks of instructional time in the academic year

hours in the program hours in the academic year

176

Additional Case #7 Pell
14 hours 14 weeks 14 hours 14 weeks

 Payment for a payment period calculation for each payment period in the program
Step 1 Scheduled Award Step 2 24 30 Step 3 14 36 $3,200 = $1,244
177

= $4,000

$4,000 = $3,200

Additional Case #7 Pell
14 hours 14 weeks 14 hours 14 weeks

Start date 1st Pell disbursement

2nd Pell disbursement

 The student receives two Pell disbursements that total $2,488 out of a $4,000 Scheduled Award.

178

Additional Case #7 Loans
14 hours 14 weeks Midpoint 14 hours 14 weeks

1st loan disbursement

2nd loan disbursement

 The loan period is for the program which is less than an academic year in length.  The institution must prorate the loan limit for the loan by 28/36, the lesser of
wks in program (28)/wks in ac yr (30) or hrs in program (28)/hrs in ac yr (36)
179

Additional Case #7 Pell and Loans
14 hours 14 weeks Midpoint 2nd Pell
disbursement

14 hours 14 weeks

Start date 1st Pell disbursement

1st loan disbursement

2nd loan disbursement

 Pell and loan disbursements coincide.

180