Chapter 15

Foreign Direct Investment Theory and Strategy

The Theory of Comparative Advantage
• The theory of comparative advantage provides  a basis for explaining and justifying  international trade in a model world assumed to  enjoy free trade, perfect competition, no  uncertainty, costless information, and no  government interference.

15-2

The Theory of Comparative Advantage
• The theory contains the following features:
– Exporters in Country A sell goods or services to  unrelated importers in Country B – Firms in Country A specialize in making products  that can be produced relatively efficiently, given  Country A’s endowment of factors of production,  that is, land, labor, capital, and technology – Firms in Country B do likewise, given the factors of  production found in Country B – In this way the total combined output of A and B is  maximized
15-3

The Theory of Comparative Advantage
– Because the factors of production cannot be moved  freely from Country A to Country B, the benefits of  specialization are realized through international  trade – The way the benefits of the extra production are  shared depends on the terms of trade, the ratio at  which quantities of the physical goods are traded – Each country’s share is determined by supply and  demand in perfectly competitive markets in the two  countries – Neither Country A nor Country B is worse off than  before trade, and typically both are better off, albeit  perhaps unequally
15-4

The Theory of Comparative Advantage
• Although international trade might have  approached the comparative advantage model  during the nineteenth century, it certainly does  not today, for the following reasons:
– Countries do not appear to specialize only in those  products that could be most efficiently produced by  that country’s particular factors of production (as a  result of government interference and ulterior  motivations) – At least two factors of production – capital and  technology – now flow directly and easily between  countries
15-5

The Theory of Comparative Advantage
– Modern factors of production are more numerous than in  this simple model – Although the terms of trade are ultimately determined by  supply and demand, the process by which the terms are  set is different from that visualized in traditional trade  theory – Comparative advantage shifts over time, as less  developed countries become developed and realize their  latent opportunities – The classical model of comparative advantage did not  really address certain other issues, such as the effect of  uncertainty and information costs, the role of  differentiated products in imperfectly competitive  markets, and economies of scale
15-6

The Theory of Comparative Advantage
• Comparative advantage is however still a relevant theory  to explain why particular countries are most suitable for  exports of goods and services that support the global  supply chain of both MNEs and domestic firms. • The comparative advantage of the 21st century, however, is  one based more on services, and thier cross­border  facilitation by telecommunications and the Internet. • The source of a nations comparative advantage is still  created from the mixture of its own labor skills, access to  capital, and technology.
15-7

The Theory of Comparative Advantage
• Many locations for supply chain outsourcing  exist today (see the following exhibit). • It takes a relative advantage in costs, not just an  absolute advantage, to create comparative  advantage. • Clearly, the extent of global outsourcing is  reaching out to every corner of the globe.

15-8

Exhibit 15.5 Global Outsourcing of Comparative Advantage
CHINA
LONDON BERLIN PARIS SHANGHAI

BUDAPEST

EAST. EUROPE

PHILIPPINES
MANILA

UNITED STATES

RUSSIA
MOSCOW

MEXICO
MONTERREY GUADALAJARA SAN JOSE JOHANNESBURG BOMBAY HYDERABAD BANGALORE

COSTA RICA

INDIA

S. AFRICA

Data: Gartner, McKinsey, BW

MNEs based in many of the major industrial countries are outsourcing many of their intellectual functions to providers based in many of the traditional emerging market countries.
15-9

Market Imperfections: A Rationale for the Existence of the Multinational Firm
• MNEs strive to take advantage of  imperfections in national markets for products,  factors of production, and financial assets. • Imperfections in the market for products  translate into market opportunities for MNEs. • Large international firms are better able to  exploit such competitive factors as economies  of scale, managerial and technological  expertise, product differentiation, and financial  strength than are their local competitors.
15-10

Market Imperfections: A Rationale for the Existence of the Multinational Firm
• Strategic motives drive the decision to invest  abroad and become a MNE and can be  summarized under the following categories:
– Market seekers – Raw material seekers – Production efficiency seekers – Knowledge seekers – Political safety seekers

• These categories are not mutually exclusive.
15-11

Sustaining and Transferring Competitive Advantage
• In deciding whether to invest abroad, management  must first determine whether the firm has a sustainable  competitive advantage that enables it to compete  effectively in the home market. • The competitive advantage must be firm­specific,  transferable, and powerful enough to compensate the  firm for the potential disadvantages of operating  abroad (foreign exchange risks, political risks, and  increased agency costs). • There are several competitive advantages enjoyed by  MNEs.
15-12

Sustaining and Transferring Competitive Advantage
• Economies of scale and scope:
– Can be developed in production, marketing, finance, research  and development, transportation, and purchasing – Large size is a major contributing factor (due to international  and/or domestic operations)

• Managerial and marketing expertise:
– Includes skill in managing large industrial organizations  (human capital and technology) – Also encompasses knowledge of modern analytical techniques  and their application in functional areas of business

15-13

Sustaining and Transferring Competitive Advantage
• Advanced technology:
– Includes both scientific and engineering skills

• Financial strength:
– Demonstrated financial strength by achieving and  maintaining a global cost and availability of capital – This is a critical competitive cost variable that  enables them to fund FDI and other foreign  activities

15-14

Sustaining and Transferring Competitive Advantage
• Differentiated products:
– Firms create their own firm­specific advantages by  producing and marketing differentiated products – Such products originate from research­based  innovations or heavy marketing expenditures to  gain brand identification

• Competitiveness of the home market:
– A strongly competitive home market can sharpen a  firm’s competitive advantage relative to firms  located in less competitive ones – This phenomenon is known as the diamond of  national advantage and has four components

15-15

Exhibit 15.7 Determinants of National Competitive Advantage: Porter’s Diamond

(1) Factor conditions

(4) Firm strategy, structure, & rivalry (3) Related and supporting Industries

(2) Demand conditions

Source: Michael Porter, “The Competitive Advantage of Nations,” Harvard Business Review, March-April 1990.

15-16

The OLI Paradigm and Internalization
• The OLI Paradigm is an attempt to create an overall  framework to explain why MNEs choose FDI rather  than serve foreign markets through alternative models  such as licensing, joint ventures, strategic alliances,  management contracts, and exporting.
– “O” owner­specific (competitive advantage in the home  market that can be transferred abroad) – “L” location­specific (specific characteristics of the  foreign market allow the firm to exploit its competitive  advantage) – “I” internalization (maintenance of its competitive  position by attempting to control the entire value chain  in its industry)
15-17

Where to Invest?
• The decision about where to invest abroad is influenced by behavioral  factors. • The decision about where to invest abroad for the first time is not the  same as the decision about where to reinvest abroad. • In theory, a firm should identify its competitive advantages, and then  search worldwide for market imperfections and comparative  advantage until it finds a country where it expects to enjoy a  competitive advantage large enough to generate a risk­adjusted return  above the firm’s hurdle rate. • In practice, firms have been observed to follow a sequential search  pattern as described in the behavioral theory of the firm.

15-18

Where to Invest?
• The decision to invest abroad is often a stage in the  firm’s development process. • Eventually the firm experiences a stimulus from the  external environment, which leads it to consider  production abroad. • Some important external stimuli are:
– – – – An outside proposal, from a quality source Fear of losing a market The “bandwagon” effect Strong competition from abroad in the home market

15-19

How to Invest Abroad: Modes of Foreign Involvement
• The globalization process includes a sequence  of decisions regarding where production is to  occur, who is to own or control intellectual  property, and who is to own the actual  production facilities. • The following exhibit provides a roadmap to  explain this FDI sequence.

15-20

Exhibit 15.9 The FDI Sequence: Foreign Presence & Foreign Investment
The Firm and its Competitive Advantage

Greater Foreign Presence

Change Competitive Advantage

Exploit Existing Competitive Advantage Abroad

Production at Home: Exporting

Production Abroad

Licensing Management Contract

Control Assets Abroad

Greater Foreign Investment

Joint Venture

Wholly-Owned Affiliate

Greenfield Investment

Acquisition of a Foreign Enterprise
15-21

How to Invest Abroad: Modes of Foreign Investment
• Exporting versus production abroad:
– There are several advantages to limiting a  firm’s activities to exports as it has none of the  unique risks facing FDI, Joint Ventures,  strategic alliances and licensing with minimal  political risks – The amount of front­end investment is typically  lower than other modes of foreign involvement – Some disadvantages include the risks of losing  markets to imitators and global competitors
15-22

How to Invest Abroad: Modes of Foreign Investment
• Licensing and management contracts versus  control of assets abroad:
– Licensing is a popular method for domestic firms to  profit from foreign markets without the need to  commit sizeable funds – However, there are disadvantages which include:
• License fees are lower than FDI profits • Possible loss of quality control • Establishment of a potential competitor in third­country  markets • Risk that technology will be stolen
15-23

How to Invest Abroad: Modes of Foreign Investment
– Management contracts are similar to  licensing, insofar as they provide for some  cash flow from a foreign source without  significant foreign investment or exposure – Management contracts probably lessen  political risk because the repatriation of  managers is easy

15-24

How to Invest Abroad: Modes of Foreign Investment
• Joint venture versus wholly owned subsidiary:
– A joint venture is here defined as shared ownership  in a foreign business – Some advantages of a MNE working with a local  joint venture partner are:
• Better understanding of local customs, mores and  institutions of government • Providing for capable mid­level management • Some countries do not allow 100% foreign  ownership • Local partners have their own contacts and  reputation which aids in business
15-25

How to Invest Abroad: Modes of Foreign Investment
– However, joint ventures are not as common as  100%­owned foreign subsidiaries as a result of  potential conflicts or difficulties including:
• Increased political risk if the wrong partner is chosen • Divergent views about the need for cash dividends,  or the best source of funds for growth (new financing  versus internally generated funds) • Transfer pricing issues • Difficulties in the ability to rationalize production on  a worldwide basis

15-26

How to Invest Abroad: Modes of Foreign Investment
• Greenfield investment versus acquisition:
– A greenfield investment is defined as establishing a  production or service facility starting from the  ground up – Compared to a greenfield investment, a cross­ border acquisition is clearly much quicker and can  also be a cost effective way to obtain technology  and/or brand names – Cross­border acquisitions are however, not without  pitfalls, as firms often pay too high a price or utilize  expensive financing to complete a transaction
15-27

How to Invest Abroad: Modes of Foreign Investment
• The term strategic alliance conveys different meanings  to different observers. • In one form of cross­border strategic alliance, two  firms exchange a share of ownership with one another. • A more comprehensive strategic alliance, partners  exchange a share of ownership in addition to creating a  separate joint venture to develop and manufacture a  product or service • Another level of cooperation might include joint  marketing and servicing agreements in which each  partner represents the other in certain markets.
15-28

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful