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Today

Announcements Type and design basics Type categories Contrast, Proximity, Alignment

Announcements

Read Williams, Chapters 1­5 before studio next week Make some notes for yourself (I like to use post­its to “mark” key pages  and examples in the book to emulate)

Design Rules

Artist? Probably not Rules enable “good” design despite that

Design Rules

Encoding/Decoding

Creators encode meaning  Viewers/Readers/Audiences decode  meaning

Tenuous process at best “Bad design” short­circuits that process Distracting, difficult... or completely misleading

Focus on the rules

Temptation = experiment, emulate cutting­edge designs Probably won’t work In this class you’re evaluated on how well you follow the rules

Font basics

Serif
Sans Serif

How do we “read”?

We read by detecting WORD shapes (not letterforms). Purpose of serifs Use of serif fonts Use of serif fonts

Fonts

Old Style Modern Slab Serif Sans Serif
Script


Decorative/Novelty

Old Style

Diagonal stress on 

O l
 )

Serifs on lowercase letters are slanted ( 

Goudy, Minion Pro, Times, Baskerville, Garamond

Modern

Vertical stress 

MO d e

Serifs on lower case, thin, horizontal  

Radical thin/thick transitions   Times Bold, Onyx

Slab Serif

Vertical stress   

e b S

Serifs on lower case are horizontal, thick  

Little or no variation in thick/thin    Rockwell, Playbill

Sans Serif

No serifs anywhere   

No thick/thin transition  

S S S S
   vs.      vs. 

Arial, Helvetica, Myriad Pro

Script

Edwardian Script, Zapfino

Decorative/Novelty

Bauhaus, Braggadocio, Chalkboard, Marker Felt, Party, Papyrus, Stencil

A few words about “style”

Fonts are art, but they’re also fashion Like any fashion, fonts go in and out of style Times, Helvetica, Courier: Have become clichés Why? Overuse. Why overused? Laser Printers Others: Palatino, Arial, Bookman, Century Schoolbook

What do I need to know?

You will be asked to distinguish what category fonts fall in I won’t ask you to name fonts (this is Palatino, by the way—distinctive  ) You will be expected to know “appropriate” uses for fonts under the rules  (covered extensively in your text) You will be expected to use fonts appropriately in your assignments

P

Eyes of Design

Visual

What do you like What looks “good”

Critical

What is good about it? How can you use that? Is communication facilitated by your choices?

Williams’ rules

Contrast Repetition Alignment Proximity

What she’s really saying...

Keep it simple Minimize the number of “elements” on a page Emphasize what “needs” to be emphasized De­emphasize what doesn’t need special treatment

Contrast

Seek dramatic contrast in your work Williams: Don’t be a wimp Achieve contrast by mixing very light and very dark type Want to achieve a sort of “color” or “texture” using different  combinations, styles, sizes and weights of type

SDSU College of Arts & Sciences

SDSU College of Arts & Sciences

SDSU College of Arts & Sciences

SDSU College of Arts & Sciences

SDSU College of Arts & Sciences

SDSU College of Arts & Sciences

SDSU College of Arts & Sciences

SDSU
College of Arts & Sciences

SDSU
College of Arts & Sciences
Lines help “organize” and delineate elements

SDSU
College of Arts & Sciences
Middle line delineates; Black lines set boundaries

SDSU
College of Arts & Sciences
Mixing weights of Myriad Pro adds additional contrast

SDSU
College of Arts& Sciences
Using script ampersand adds visual interest

Achieving Contrast

Combine complementary fonts Vary sizes Vary weights Add lines or other graphical elements (and vary their weights, too) Push it until it doesn’t work, then back one step

Proximity

Group related items together Closeness implies a relationship Emphasis/De­emphasis Intellectually connected AND visually connected Seek to make groups

Box 2235 Brookings, SD 57007

South Dakota State University

Matthew Cecil, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

605.688­6511

Matthew Cecil, Ph.D.
Associate Professor South Dakota State University Box 2235 Brookings, SD 57007 605.688-6511

Tips

Avoid too many separate elements Don’t lump in corners, middle Meter your white space (White space is a GOOD thing!) Avoid confusion Unrelated: move them apart

Alignment

Nothing is arbitrary Centering items = simplistic Avoid “centered” pages Find a single line and stick to it Goal = unity, simplicity

Matthew Cecil, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor

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Department of Journalism and Mass Communication South Dakota State University Box 2235 Brookings, SD 57007 605.688.6511

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Matthew Cecil, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor South Dakota State University Box 2235 Brookings, SD 57007 605.688-6511

Repetition

Repetition of elements creates unity within a complex document Each page is not an opportunity to “redesign” the page But at the same time, not looking for identical pages Want variance of some elements (fonts, graphics, logos) but not identical  pages

Balance

Related to alignment Eyes, brain seek patterns Balance = arrangement of items so they “equal” each other Weight is counterbalanced

Balance

Symmetrical balance = comfortable Not interesting Asymmetrical balance adds visual interest Centered text, acceptable, not ideal