CCNA 4 v3.

1 Module 5 Frame Relay

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Purpose of This PowerPoint
• This PowerPoint primarily consists of the Target Indicators (TIs) of this module in CCNA version 3.1. • It was created to give instructors a PowerPoint to take and modify as their own. • This PowerPoint is:
NOT a study guide for the module final assessment. NOT a study guide for the CCNA certification exam.

• Please report any mistakes you find in this PowerPoint by using the Academy Connection Help link.
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To Locate Instructional Resource Materials on Academy Connection:
• Go to the Community FTP Center to locate materials created by the instructor community • Go to the Tools section • Go to the Alpha Preview section • Go to the Community link under Resources • See the resources available on the Class home page for classes you are offering • Search http://www.cisco.com • Contact your parent academy!
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Objectives

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Frame Relay Operation

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Frame Relay Switches

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Frame Relay Concepts

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Virtual Circuits

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Local Significance of DLCIs
The data-link connection identifier (DLCI) is stored in the Address field of every frame transmitted.

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Terminology
• The connection through the Frame Relay network between two DTEs is called a virtual circuit (VC). • Virtual circuits may be established dynamically by sending signaling messages to the network. In this case they are called switched virtual circuits (SVCs). • Virtual circuits can be configured manually through the network. In this case they are called permanent virtual circuits (PVCs).
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Frame Relay Stack Layered Support

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Frame Relay Functions

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Bandwidth and Flow Control
Bit counter Example 1

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Frame Relay Concepts
Queue

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Frame Relay Concepts

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Frame Relay Concepts

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Selecting a Frame Relay Topology

Full Mesh

Partial Mesh Star (Hub and Spoke)

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LAPF Frame – Address Field

6-bits

4-bits

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Data Link Control Identifier
• The 10-bit DLCI associates the frame with its virtual circuit • It is of local significance only - a frame will not generally be delivered with the same DLCI with which it started • Some DLCI’s are reserved

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Local Management Interface (LMI)

• Three types of LMIs are supported by Cisco routers: Cisco — The original LMI extensions Ansi — Corresponding to the ANSI standard T1.617 Annex D q933a — Corresponding to the ITU standard Q933 Annex A

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LMI Frame Format

1 Flag

2 Address

1 Control

1 PD

1 CR

1 MT LMI Message

2

1

FCS Flag

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Stages of Inverse ARP and LMI Operation #1

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Stages of Inverse ARP and LMI Operation #2

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Configuring Basic Frame Relay

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Configuring a Static Frame Relay Map

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Reachability Issues with Routing Updates in NBMA

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Reachability Issues with Routing Updates in NBMA
By default, a Frame Relay network provides nonbroadcast multiaccess (NBMA) connectivity between remote sites. An NBMA environment is treated like other multiaccess media environments, where all the routers are on the same subnet.

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Frame Relay Subinterfaces

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Configuring Point-to-Point Subinterfaces

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Verifying Frame Relay
• The show interfaces command displays information regarding the encapsulation and Layer 1 and Layer 2 status. It also displays information about the following:
The LMI type The LMI DLCI The Frame Relay data terminal equipment/data circuit-terminating equipment (DTE/DCE) type
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The show interface Command

LMI Status

LMI DLCI LMI Type

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The show frame-relay lmi Command

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The show frame-relay pvc Command

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The show frame-relay map Command

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Troubleshooting Frame Relay The debug frame-relay lmi Command

PVC Status 0x2 – Active 0x0 – Inactive 0x4 – Deleted

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Summary

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