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MANAGING KNOWLEDGE WORKERS

CHAPTER 15

Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers

What Is a Knowledge Worker?

Embodies experience, innovation, creativity, and transformation of experience into knowledge for leveraging products or services  Transforms business and personal experience into knowledge through capturing, assessing, applying, sharing, and disseminating it within the organization to solve specific problems or to create value

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and adopt new ways that result in better ways of doing a job  In command of self-control and self-learning  Willing to grow with the company 3 .Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers Personality and Professional Attributes  Holds unique values  Aligns personal and professional growth with corporate vision  Adopts an attitude of collaboration and sharing  Has innovative capacity and a creative mind  Has a clear understanding of the business he is a part  Willing to learn. unlearn.

Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers Makeup of the Knowledge Worker Transformatio n process IT Tools Value s KNOWLEDGE WORKER Organizationa l Culture Personal and corporate experience 4 .

cooperation.Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers Core Competencies Thinking skills—having a vision how the product or the company can be better  Continuous learning—unlearning and relearning in tune with fast-changing conditions  Innovative teams and teamwork—via collaboration. and coordination  Innovation and creativity—”dreaming” new ways to advance the firm  5 .

and determination  Culture of responsibility toward knowledge— loyalty and commitment to one’s manager or leader  6 .Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers Core Competencies (cont’d) Risk taking and potential success—making joint decisions with calculated risk  Decision action taking—be willing to embrace professional discipline. patience.

to create. focus shifted from quantitative to qualitative performanceoriented value-added decision making (See Fig. 15.Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers Business Roles in the Learning Organization Learning organization—an organization of people with ingrained commitment to improve their capacity. and to produce what they want to produce  Data and information are givens  Since the 1960s.2)  7 .

Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers From Data Processing to Self-Learning—A Trend Non algorithmic (heuristic) Non programmable SMARTNESS KNOWLEDGE INFORMATION Algorithmic DATA Programmable From Data Processing to Self-Learning 8 .

creating. sharing. especially during an emergency 9 .Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers Work Management Tasks  Managing knowledge workers  Searching out. and using knowledge regularly  Maintaining work motivation among knowledge workers  Ensuring readiness to work.

and concurrent activities among knowledge workers 10 .Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers Work Management Tasks (cont’d)  Allocating effort and switching control among tasks  Sharing information and integrating work among knowledge workers  Hiring or recruiting bright. coordination. knowledge-seeking individuals  Managing collaboration.

Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers Factors That Limit Knowledge Workers Productivity  Time constraint  Working smarter and harder and accomplishing little  Knowledge workers doing work that the firm did not hire them to do  Work schedule  Motivation against knowledge work productivity 11 .

Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers Work Adjustment Model  Ensuring the right match between the vocational needs of knowledge workers and the requirements of their jobs  Achieving and maintaining match with the work environment are basic motives of human work behavior  When the individual achieves correspondence. he or she can continue with future opportunities with the firm 12 .

Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers Work Adjustment Model Correspondence (match) Satisfactoriness (satisfactory employee) Abilities Job requirements Promote Transfer Individua l Fire Job Retain Vocational needs Reinforcers Job Satisfaction (satisfied employee) option Quit Remain TENURE Correspondence (match) NEW JOB 13 .

Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers Smart Leadership Requirements  Assessing core competency of the firm  Response to the firm’s internal shortcomings  Vivid knowledge of the external market and the tricky nature of the competition in the marketplace  Online response to the company’s external environment  Measuring the return on time 14 .

and disseminate information from databases and knowledge bases 15 . information distribution. and information interpretation  Ultimate goal of technology is to serve organizational memory and create a working environment that provides these conditions  Knowledge worker expect to have technical know-how to access.Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers Technology and the Knowledge Worker  IT contributes to knowledge capture. update.

Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers Knowledge Worker’s Skills  Technical skills and abilities  Professional experience  Soft traits such as a sense of cultural. political. and personal aspects of knowledge in the business  Personal attributes  Communication skills  Educational background and college degree 16 .

Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers Role of Ergonomics  Environmental issues  Hardware issues  Knowledge worker-system interface that emphasizes:  Minimum worker effort and memory  Best use of human patterns  Prompt problem notification  Maximum task support 17 .

Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers Role of the CKO  Maximize returns on investment in knowledge—people. processes. and technology  Share best practices and reinforce goods of knowledge sharing among employees  Promote company innovations and commercialization of new ideas  Minimize “brain drain” or knowledge loss at all levels of the business 18 .

Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers Role of the CKO (cont’d)  Agent of change  Investigator  Linking pin  Listener  Politician 19 .

Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers CKO’s Technical Skills  Broad knowledge of business practice and ability to translate technical information at employee level  Making effective use of technical and nontechnical elements in KM design  Knowledge of information technology. and how information is transformed into knowledge 20 . information systems.

and working with management at all levels  Understanding—e.g. identifying problem areas and determining their impact 21 .Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers Key CKO Attributes  Teaching and selling  Communicating—speaking the language of the user.. mediate.

Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers Factors Change Leaders Consider  Focus less on problems and more on successes and opportunities  Adopt an attitude that views challenges as opportunities  Work on creating tomorrow’s business instead of hammering on yesterday’s problems 22 .

Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers The Soft Side Always Wins  Encourage every team member to create new knowledge in the interest of the project  Help knowledge workers do their jobs  Allow knowledge workers to participate in major company decisions. which can pay off in intrinsic and extrinsic benefits for the company and employees alike  Encourage knowledge workers and employees to learn as they earn a living on a regular basis 23 .

and special prizes can be a hit with the winning team  Publicize success throughout the firm 24 . and so forth  Monetary rewards. where team performance will determine size and nature of the incentive  Use awards for teams as well as individuals for unique contributions  Flextime allows the team to decide on when to work. when to quit. bonuses.Chapter 15: Managing Knowledge Workers Incentives and Motivation  Link incentives to a team approach.

MANAGING KNOWLEDGE WORKERS CHAPTER 15 .