Technology and Engagement

New Pathways Capstone 2013 Dr. Christopher Shamburg Graduate Program in Educational Technology New Jersey City University cshamburg@njcu.edu

AchieveNJ and TeachNJ
AchieveNJ: New Jersey’s educator evaluation and support system

The TEACHNJ Act, signed into law in August 2012, mandated that new evaluation systems based on multiple measures of student learning and teacher practice be implemented statewide in 2013-14.

AchieveNJ

Teacher Practice

55% Teacher Practice

85% Teacher Practice

Source: NJ Department of Education. (May, 2013) AchieveNJ: Educator Evaluation and Support in New Jersey Retrieved May 30 from http://www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ/intro/guide.pdf

55%-85% Teacher Practice

Source: NJ Department of Education. (May, 2013). AchieveNJ: Improved evaluation and support for teachers and principals. Retrieved June 6, 2013 from : http://www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ/intro/RegOverview.pdf

Student Engagement
• Take risks to pursue quality • Shows concentration and effort

• Attention and participation fluctuates
• Follow direction in a routine manner

• Stay on task without teacher intervention

Engagement Spectrum
• Deep Engagement: Students take full ownership of learning activities,
displaying high levels of energy, a willingness to ask questions, pursue answers, consider alternatives, and take risks in pursuit of quality.

• Engagement: Students begin taking ownership of learning activities. Their
involvement shows concentration and effort to understand and complete the task. They do not simply follow directions but actively work to improve the quality of their performance.

• Active Compliance: Students participate in learning activities and stay on
task without teacher intervention. However, their work has a routine or rote quality and significant thought or commitment to quality is not evident.

• Passive Compliance: Students follow directions in a rote or routine manner.
Attention may be mildly distracted and they may need some added teacher attention or direction to remain on task.

• Periodic Compliance: Students’ attention and participation fluctuates.
Harvey F. Silver & Matthew J. Perini, The Strategic Teacher

ACT 3, SCENE 3 of Macbeth, A park near the palace.

Remixing Shakespeare

First Murderer But who did bid thee join with us?
Third Murderer Macbeth. Second Murderer He needs not our mistrust, since he delivers Our offices and what we have to do To the direction just.

First Murderer Then stand with us. The west yet glimmers with some streaks of day.

Third Murderer Hark! I hear horses.

Math, Tools, and Authenticity: Stairway to Algebra

Multimedia Unplugged: Tableaux Vivants
In a Tableaux Vivant a group of students pose in a ‘living picture’ of an event or idea. It can be used for, timelines or events or it can be used in more abstract ideas such as the Bill or Rights or the Laws of Motion. The teacher or a student will read the ‘scene’ then freeze. You can take a picture of the tableaux afterwards.
See: Rome Wasn’t Built in a Day

Organizational Tool: Stations and Limited Technology

Station Teaching
Stations are spots in the classroom where small groups of students can work on various tasks simultaneously and then rotate.
Station 1 Station 2

Station 5

Station 3

Station 4

Station Teaching

Station Options
• Can be teacher-led or student-directed, independent, or collaborate. • Stations can work at a station for 8 minutes or a full class period • Stations can focus on the same topic in different ways or different parts of a larger topic.

Example: 5th Grade Math : fractions
CCSS.Math.Content.5.NF.A.1 Add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators (including mixed numbers) by replacing given fractions with equivalent fractions in such a way as to produce an equivalent sum or difference of fractions with like denominators. For example, 2/3 + 5/4 = 8/12 + 15/12 = 23/12. (In general, a/b + c/d = (ad + bc)/bd.)

Example: 5th Grade Math : Fractions with unlike denominators
Station 1: Students will adjust recipes from magazines with fractional ingredients for different numbers of people. Station 2: Students will play ‘fractions game’ with board and cards. Station 3: Students will make a short video explaining the LCD of different problems, starting simple and getting more difficult Station 4: Students will complete SmartBoard activity where they have to mix different amounts of nuts.

Example: 5th Grade Language Arts/ Figurative Language
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.5.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.

Example: Language Arts/ Figurative Language
• Station 1: Students are given red index cards with the first half of a simile and yellow index cards with the second half. Then need to appropriately connect the cards working as a group. Station 2: Student are given 3 epic similes and must write a short story that uses all 3. Station 3: Students are given pictures in a PowerPoint show of natural phenomenon and use them to describe the actions of people (e.g. he made a mess like a hurricane)

Station 4: Students are given a list of figures of speech and must enact them and video record (e.g. busy as bees).
Station 5: Students will do a variety of activities on the Smartboard relating to Idiomatic Expressions.

Limitless Possibilities for Activities with and without Technology
Short readings Small group discussions Paper-and-pencil tasks Hands-on activities Small projects Independent or partner reading Cartoons Graphic Organizers Smart Board Activities Technology (Kindles, Ipods, Video-streaming, Garageband) Listening Activities Art or drama exercises Puzzles Interpersonal reflection Mini-lessons Games Chalkboard work Brainstorming Video or DVD viewing Observations or examinations of processes or materials Models

Friend & Cook, 2003

Simple Tips for Management
Students need training in on strategies for station and group work:
-Remind students to read directions -Go over strategies for staying on track during stations -Consider providing incentives for station completion

Developing Stations: Considerations
– You cannot do something sequential as there is no order to the stations (e.g. you cannot have kids brainstorm, draft, revise, etc,) – Judiciously group the students.
• Heterogeneous in literacy skills • Personalities that mesh (common interests?) Pay attention to students who interact well together; placement of outcasts and bullies?

– Retain right to change groups if misbehavior interferes with activity – Consider making a station outside of the classroom—the gym, an empty room, outside, the auditorium (if you have the supervision or co-teacher)

PLAN FOR ALL STUDENTS: UNIVERSAL DESIGN FOR LEARNING

Universal Design

UDL is…
A set of research-based guidelines for curriculum development. Guidelines that focus on: Multiple means of representation to give learners various ways of acquiring information and knowledge

Multiple means of expression to provide learners alternatives for demonstrating what they know.
Multiple means of engagement to tap into learners' interests, challenge them appropriately, and motivate them to learn.

UDL is…
A set of research-based guidelines for curriculum development. Guidelines that focus on: Multiple means of representation—what is learned Multiple means of expression—how it’s learned Multiple means of engagement --why it’s learned

A National Imperative: National Educational Technology Plan

“The model of learning described in this plan calls for engaging and empowering personalized learning experiences for learners of all ages...It calls for using state-of-the-art technology and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) concepts to enable, motivate, and inspire all students to achieve, regardless of background, languages, or disabilities.”
--Arne Duncan, US Secretary of Education Letter to Congress Introducing the National Educational Technology Plan http://www.ed.gov/technology/netp-2010/letter-secretary

UDL Guidelines
Multiple Means of Representation 1. Options for Perception 2. Options for Language, Expression and Symbols 3. Options for Comprehension Multiple Means for Action and Expression 4. Options for Physical Action 5. Options for Expression and Communication. 6. Options for Executive Function Multiple Means of Engagement 7. Options for Recruiting Interest 8. Options for Sustaining Effort and Persistence 9. Options for Self-Regulation

Case Study in UDL
Multiple Means of Representation 1. Options for Perception 2. Options for Language, Expression and Symbols 3. Options for Comprehension Multiple Means for Action and Expression 4. Options for Physical Action 5. Options for Expression and Communication. 6. Options for Executive Function Multiple Means of Engagement 7. Options for Recruiting Interest 8. Options for Sustaining Effort and Persistence 9. Options for Self-Regulation

1, 4, 7, 8 Mr. Mook’s Stairway to Algebra UDL Guidelines ____________ A 7th grade algebra teacher teaches slope by having students review common mistakes and then apply the slope formula to real life problems involving building codes.

Cases in UDL
Multiple Means of Representation
1. Options for Perception 2. Options for Language, Expression and Symbols 3. Options for Comprehension

Multiple Means for Action and Expression
4. Options for Physical Action 5. Options for Expression and Communication. 6. Options for Executive Function

Multiple Means of Engagement
7. Options for Recruiting Interest 8. Options for Sustaining Effort and Persistence 9. Options for Self-Regulation

Case 1: Household Vocabulary

UDL Guidelines ________________ 3, 5, 7…

Ms. Fernandez teaches Spanish. She is introducing students to the “vocabulary of the household.” She gives students a list of vocabulary words and 4 different options—draw a diagram, create a short skit, write a poem, or create a comic—each must include the set of household vocabulary words

Cases in UDL
Multiple Means of Representation Multiple Means for Action and Expression Multiple Means of Engagement

1. Options for Perception 2. Options for Language, Expression and Symbols 3. Options for Comprehension

4. Options for Physical Action 5. Options for Expression and Communication. 6. Options for Executive Function

7. Options for Recruiting Interest 8. Options for Sustaining Effort and Persistence 9. Options for Self-Regulation

Case 2: Unlike Denominators UDL Guidelines ________________ 2,3,4… Mr. Kouse teaches a sixth-grade mathematics class. He notices many students have problems adding and subtracting fractions with unlike denominators. He gets a bunch of pebbles and puts them in plastic mixing cups and demonstrates adding amounts with unlike denominators (e.g. 1/4 of a cup and 3/8 of a cup). He sets this up as a station and rotates groups of students through as other groups do different activities.

Case 3: Enacting Novels Case 4: Feedback on Cards Case 5: Audio Tour Case 6: Figurative Language Contract Case 7: Pictures and Labels Case 8: Cheat Sheet Case 9: EROX Learning System

Other Cases…

Case 10 Remixing Fables with Speech to Text
Multiple Means of Representation 1. Options for Perception 2. Options for Language, Expression and Symbols 3. Options for Comprehension Multiple Means for Action and Expression 4. Options for Physical Action 5. Options for Expression and Communication. 6. Options for Executive Function Multiple Means of Engagement 7. Options for Recruiting Interest 8. Options for Sustaining Effort and Persistence 9. Options for SelfRegulation

Which one is akin to UDL?

The End Dr. Christopher Shamburg Educational Technology Department New Jersey City University cshamburg@njcu.edu

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