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DISADVANTAGES OF SUBSIDISED ALCOHOL IN THE INDIAN ARMED FORCES

CONTENTS
• • • • • • • • • INTRODUCTION MILITARY HISTORY OF ALCOHOL CSD AND SUBSIDY ON ALCOHOL SOCIAL ACCEPTANCE PATTERNS OF CONSUMPTION ILLEGAL ACTIVITIES DISADVANTAGES REMEDIES CONCLUSION
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INTRODUCTION

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food. • Motivation to join army – free liquor.MILITARY HISTORY AND ALCOHOL • Alcohol introduced as ration in European forces in 19th century. 4 . wages and excuse to escape poverty.

• An extra pint of Rum as reward for a good job done. • Rum as painkiller and medicine for flu. • RUM – Rationed Unit Medicine ? • Commanders used it as a tool for sedation and as a motivation tool to get tough jobs done. 5 .MILITARY HISTORY AND ALCOHOL • Belief amongst Military Commanders and Doctors on medicinal value of alcohol.

• At times to celebrate victory. • Songs based on alcohol and women as motivators while on patrol or guarding the trenches.MILITARY HISTORY AND ALCOHOL • Rum and beer became an integral part of the culture of soldiers on missions abroad. • Was equally popular with the Officers and NCOs and helped reinforce the military heirarchy 6 .

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CANTEEN STORES DEPARTMENT AND ALCOHOL 8 .

CANTEEN STORES DEPARTMENT AND ALCOHOL • Canteen Stores Department established during British times in 1942. Turnover about 5000 crores. 9 . • Liquor has been given special status and is dealt with as a separate head. • Provides stores and liquor at subsidised rates to armed forces personnel. • Rare and Expensive liquor is now available in Canteens.

• Discount varies from 20% to 50% on various brands across India. • Quota of liquor authorised on leave. • Scales of liquor as laid down.CANTEEN STORES DEPARTMENT AND ALCOHOL • Smart Card – Grocery and Liquor. 10 . • Commanders at all levels to ensure liquor is given strictly as per scale.

CANTEEN STORES DEPARTMENT AND ALCOHOL • Liquor subsidised by respective State Governments by exemption on excise duty and VAT. 11 . • Both Rum and Indian Made Foreign Liquor (IMFL) is subsidised by the State Govt in terms of sales tax exemption – Loss of Revenue. • The users responsibility to not misuse this facility.

Alcohol found social acceptance ages ago. • Alcohol is the most common beverage served at most times. 12 .SOCIAL ACCEPTANCE • As is evident from the History. • Parties include Drinks followed by Food.

• Stocks available in each house.SOCIAL ACCEPTANCE • Liquor shopping each month. Beering etc. • Occasions such as Rum Punch. 13 . • Alcohol as a gift.

PATTERNS OF ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION 14 .

• Being institutionalized in the military culture such people also continue in service for longer. Rum Punch. Beering etc. hence increased affordability. 15 . • Attributable to factors like military culture and lifestyle.PATTERNS OF ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION • Studies reveal that heavy drinking is more prevalent amongst military men as compared to those outside. • Pay Scales have risen many fold over the years but the cost of liquor has remained virtually constant.

young men especially in the Ranks. Risk twice as high as Civillians. • Alcohol dependency increases. • Long duration of separation from families due to inherent nature of the services. • Heavy Drinking is mostly found in unmarried. 16 .PATTERNS OF ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION • Military life subjects a person to lots of emotional and physical stresses.

• Easy access at subsidised rates is the biggest factor. 17 .PATTERNS OF ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION • Consumption patterns differ amongst those married or otherwise. • Drinking is often accompanied by Smoking.

ILLEGAL ACTIVITIES • Owing to the subsidy on liquor many facts have come to light over the years about its consumption by unauthorised people. • Used as gifts for relatives and friends. • Remuneration in kind for servants and other civilian population for their services. • Used as bribe to get the work done in the civil streets. 18 .

• Sale of liquor outside the camp areas in lieu of cash. 19 . • Use of Air Force assets like aircraft for bringing liquor. • Import of liquor from neighbouring states because it is sold cheaper.ILLEGAL ACTIVITIES • Drawing of liquor from URCs by unauthorised population.

ILLEGAL ACTIVITIES 20 .

ILLEGAL ACTIVITIES 21 .

however on reporting 90nms from destination. Requested for radar assisted approach after unsuccessful attempt to land. Weather enroute was fair. 3. Radar was turned on after 1:45 hrs. A Mi-8 helicopter airborne from Agra to Gorakhpur on 05 Jan 90. This was below the pilots minima.CASE STUDY 1. Did not divert inspite of sufficient endurance. the vis reported was 1 km with deteriorating trend. 4. 22 . 60 nms inbound vis reduced to 500 m. 2. Pilots continued and reached overhead Gorakhpur at 2000 ft with ground not in contact.

Crash resulted in fatal injuries to two occupants and burn injuries to others. 6. In zero vis the ac made 2 attempts to land on GCA and finally crashed with a lamp post on the third attempt and caught fire.CASE STUDY 5. 23 .

CAUSE 1. Poor Decision making. Get-Homitis. Bad weather. 3. 24 . 4. Did not divert while sufficient endurance was on board. 2.

ACTUAL CAUSE • Bottles of liquor on board for the evening Party which was the primary reason for persisting even in bad weather. 25 .

DISADVANTAGES • Most disadvantages are a fallout of the illegal acts or misuse. • Various medical disorders. 26 . • Alcohol consumption if moderated will have no disadvantages. • Alcohol consumption results in many physiological. psychological and neurological stresses.

DISADVANTAGES • DISTRESSING DREAMS • FEELING DISTANT OR CUTOFF • AVOIDING SITUATIONS • FEELING JUMPY • SLEEP DISORDERS • INCREASED IRRITABILITY • OUTBURSTS OF ANGER • HANGOVER 27 .

DISADVANTAGES • UNREFRESHING SLEEP • FATIGUE • FORGETFULLNESS • LOSS OF CONCENTRATION • LOSS OR DECREASE IN APETTITE • DAMAGE TO VARIOUS ORGANS • BREAKDOWN OF CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM 28 .

• Alcoholism.DISADVANTAGES • Violation of rules. 29 . • Consumption of alcohol while on duty or just prior to duty. • Marital disharmony and violence.

DISADVANTAGES • Extended parties. resulting in reduced efficiency at work. • A tool for subversive activities. • Drinking and driving. 30 . • Bottle to throttle timings. • Reduced operational preparedness.

31 . • Findings were shocking.DISADVANTAGES • A study was conducted by group of medical officers under the DGAFMS from 2001 – 2003. 27% JCOs and rest ORs. • Studied the problem of alcoholism and alcohol abuse in the Indian Army. • Of the cases of Alcoholism about 8% were Officers.

Reduction in stresses. group therapy etc. Family therapy. reduced availability of alcohol. • Remedies suggested were Motivation.REMEDIAL ACTION • Remedies were suggested and marked improvements were noticed in the subjects. 32 .

• Subsequently these should be ensured.REMEDIAL ACTION • Regular steps to control/ moderate alcohol consumption in individuals. • Need for a comprehensive study amongst all personnel to identify problem areas and suggest remedies. • Rules and policies to be framed. 33 .

REMEDIAL ACTION • Authorised quota of liquor to be reviewed from time to time. • Severe punishments for defaulters. 34 . • Strong security to check smuggling of liquor outside the camp areas. • Moral policing to check illegal activities.

• Better communication in terms of mobile. broadband. • Culturally. social activities to focus on alternative means of entertainment. • Access to better facilities for sports and entertainment to our troops. 35 . satellite television etc.REMEDIAL ACTION • Regular seminars and lectures on various health hazards by Medical Officer.

• This will enhance the happiness quotient amongst individuals.CONCLUSION • The remedies mentioned above will help curb alcohol dependency of the military society. • Better Utilisation of available time. 36 . • Towards Better Operational Preparedness.

QUESTIONS 37 .