Dr. Coulibaly Naga Prof. Umesh Bellur Prof. Nandlal L.

Sarda

Presentation plan
1. Introduction 2. Methodology 3. Results 4. Conclusion

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Introduction
The development of almost all socio-economic sectors depends on water resources.

Water resources are mobilized to satisfy various uses like domestic, agricultural, industrial, livestock, tourism, leisure etc.
water resources are not available in sufficient quantity and quality anytime, anywhere. Creation of a tools which allows management and analysis of current and historical data.

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Introduction
General Objective: Design and create a prototype of open source (Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS) for water resources management in a watershed.

Specifics Objectives: •Collect water resources, environmental data,

socio-economic

and

•Design and implement a database, •Create a Spatial Decision Support System for water management
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Methodology

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Materials – Software
1. Desktop GIS : Quantum GIS (QGIS)
a) b) c)

Creation of plugins in Python (PyQGIS with PyQt) Customization of QGIS interface from source code Adding GRASS functionalities

2. A Cartographic server : Mapserver

3. RDBMS : PostgreSql / PostGIS
- The tool uses PostGreSQL database with PostGIS analysis tools.

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Materials - Data

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Soil Loss Evaluation
Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE)
Topographic map Statellite data Meteorologic data

DEM

Soil map

Landuse / landcover

LS Factor map

K Factor map

C Factor map

P Factor map

R Factor map

USLE Soil Erosion Model (A=R.K.LS.C.P)

Soil Loss rate

A=R.K.LS.C.P

The result (A) is the average annual soil loss
(mass/area/year)
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Soil Loss Evaluation
sub-watershed sensibility prioritization assessment
Soil Loss rate of the basin Mask map by sub-basin Soil Loss rate of a sub-basin Sum Soil Loss by subbasin Sub-basin polygon Sub-basin sensibility prioritization`s map
Figure: Flow chat for sub-watershed sensibility prioritization assessment
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Water security
Water security = Availability - Demand Water availability evaluation
Water resources are evaluated by the water balance equation. A simple from of water balance equation is as follows: P = Q + E ± ∆S
Where, P is precipitation, Q is runoff, E is evaporation ∆S = is the storage in the soil, aquifers or reservoirs.
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Water security
Global Water demand
The Water demand for each use will be assessed from the product of the specific consumption by the population (effective) involved or the planned production. Thus, the Global water demand (Dg) in m3 is modeled by the equation: Dg = Ddom+ Dagri + Dlstk + Dind
Where: Ddom , Domestic water demand, Dagri , Agricultural water demand, Dlstk , Livestock water demand, Dind , Industrial water demand.
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Water security
Domestic water demand
Domestic water demand is estimated by multiplying the population with the specific water consomption. The average specific consumption is per day per person is 40 liters in urban areas, rural and semi-urban areas, it’s respectively 15 and 20 l / day / person (BAD, 1993).

Agricultural water demand
Agricultural water demand is a function of crop type and agricultural practices and also of the climatic region

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Water security
Livestock water demand
Water requirements depend on the livestock species, the forage quality and climate. According to the Inter-State Hydraulic Study (CIEH) the values are:
- Cattle: 39.2 l / day / head - Sheep: 4.3 l / day / head - Goats: 4.3 l / day / head

Industrial water demand.
The industrial water demand for each industry equals to the product of production with the corresponding water-demand per a production unit .

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Water vulnerability
Multi-criteria Evaluation (MCE)
 The most commonly used decision rule is the

weighted linear combination

 where:
     

S = ∑wixi x ∏cj

S is the composite suitability score xi – factor normalised wi – weights assigned to each factor ci – constraints (or boolean factors) ∑ -- sum of weighted factors ∏ -- product of constraints (1-suitable, 0-unsuitable)

Example: With a GIS raster calculator S =((F1 * 0.67) + (F2 * 0.06) + (F3 * 0.27)) * cons_boolean
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Water vulnerability
Groundwater vulnerability Criteria
1. Pesticide application Method (foliar, soil surface or incorporation),

2. Risk of lixiviation caused by soil type (estimated from the soil organic matter rate, texture or depth of soil), 3. Human toxicity estimated from the acceptable daily intake (ADI),
4. Quantity applied per hectare,

5. Depth of groundwater,
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Water vulnerability
Surface vulnerability Criteria
1. Runoff generated by the characteristics of the plot (slope, length, texture, surface condition), 2. Rate of drift from the application of the product (estimated from the distance of the parcel to the watercourse), 3. Mode of application, 4. Pesticide persistent, 5. Toxicity on target organisms (people, algae, crustaceans, fish, ...),

6. Quantity molecule applied per hectare,
7. Drainage density weighted.
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Results

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System architecture
SERVEUR Spatial DBMS - PostGis

CLIENT Desktop GIS - QGIS GRASS

INTERNET INTRANET

Web Map Server - Mapserver

Client interface developed with Quantum GIS 1.6 shell enhanced with GRASS functionalities.

Web Server - Apache

Figure: Functional structure of the system
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Desktop GIS tool
Application

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Todo
1. Develop USLE, vulnerability and water security functions 2. Customize some queries and graphs ; map composer. 3. Write the report and 1 paper for publication

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Conclusion
This study is aims at creating a Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS) prototype for the integrated water resources management for various uses. This Spatial tool will be an institutional spatial tool for decision making and for concertations between all the water resources actors (users, managers, NGO, …) for a sustainable management of water.
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End

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