You are on page 1of 12

 Importance of Girls Education and 

Its Impact on Development 

by Azra Kacapor, World Learning


May 2009
Facts and Figures on Girls Education

 62 million girls are out of school ( over 60%)

 There are 781 million illiterate adults, two­thirds of them women, world wide

 Children whose mothers have no education are more than twice as likely to be out of 

school as children whose mothers have some education. 

 In developing countries, 75% of the children not in school have uneducated mothers 

Source: United Nations Girls Education Initiative  
Challenges to Girls Education
     
 Cultural barriers to girls’ education 

 Poverty 

 Early marriage 

 Girls become primary 

caregivers at an early age
 Issues of access to schools 
        Challenges to Girls Education

 Pedagogical structure often geared towards the needs and learning abilities 
of males
 Safety concerns

 Inadequate curriculum

 Shortage of female teachers
 Centralized approach discourages
     community involvement that would 
     cater to specific needs
World Learning Approach to Girls 
Education Programming  
 School Based
 Community Driven 
 Focused on increasing girls’ access, 
retention, and performance in schools 
 Addresses social barriers to girls education
 Mainstreaming gender through activities 
and 
 Focus on girls as an independent 
component 
           Girls’ Advisory Committees
 House­to house visits to encourage parents to enroll girls in school

 Tutorial classes for female students

 Provision of school supplies, clothing and hygiene supplies for girls from poor 
families 

 Provision of counseling to prevent dropout, gender education, prevention of 
early marriages, and awards for high achieving female students

 Sensitizing parents and community leaders about harmful traditional customs ­ 
inheritance of widows to brothers or uncles, polygamy, female genital 
mutilation, early marriage, abduction, and rape

 Rescue of female students from abduction attempts and support to continue 
their education
            Girls’ Advisory Committees
                                                Ethiopia

 Elders and church leaders convinced 
parents to cancel the marriage of a 
female student

 Returning to School After Marriage
                       Girls’ Advisory Committees
                                        Ecuador 

 Incentive­based approach instead of safe, permanent position for 
instructors
 Gender­awareness training
 School dropout prevention               
      program
 Institutional policy 
      strengthening and strategic 
      alliance­building
Girls’ Advisory Committees 
                                                          Ecuador

 Participatory approach strengthens 
communities

 Curriculum materials and teacher 
training

 3,500 out of school indigenous 
children enrolled in education 
programs, 

 1,154 children removed from child 
labor 
Lessening the gender gap – intervention 
strategies 

 Pre­school preparation programs followed by on­time intake awareness

 Allowing girls to enroll in school regardless of age and offering accelerated 

education programs to bridge age to grade gap

 “Child­to­child” activities to promote reading and constructive learning 

(female students in grades five and six for girls in grades one through three) 

 Allowing girls to engage in “special late girls’ enrollment” periods 

 Introducing a tracking system for readmitting girls after they drop out and/or 

become pregnant 
Lessening the gender gap– Intervention 
strategies cont.

 Ensuring discipline guidelines to prevent harassment of girls by boys.

 Institute Girls’ Days for libraries and other activities where girls may 

have marginalized usage rates; 

 Ensure that a “no cultural excuses” stance is observed in all activities 

related to girls’ education, particularly related to abuse, harm, 

harassment, and lack of emotional or professional fulfillment of girls 

etc.
      Personal Testimony: Erika’s Story