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Selecting a Topic and Purpose
Stephen E. Lucas

McGraw-Hill

© 2007 Stephen E. Lucas. All rights reserved.

Slide 2

Topic
The subject of a speech.

McGraw-Hill

© 2007 Stephen E. Lucas. All rights reserved.

All rights reserved. .Slide 3 Brainstorming A method of generating ideas for speech topics by free association of words and ideas. McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E. Lucas.

Lucas. All rights reserved.Problems © 2007 Stephen E. .Plans and Policies .Natural Phenomena .Slide 4 Brainstorming • Personal Inventory • Clustering – People – Places – Things – Events – Processes – Concepts McGraw-Hill .

Lucas. .Slide 5 • Reference Search • Internet Search McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E. All rights reserved.

( To INFORM or to PERSUADE) McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E. . Lucas. All rights reserved.Slide 6 General Purpose The broad goal of a speech.

Lucas.Slide 7 Specific Purpose Statement A single infinitive phrase that states precisely what a speaker hopes to accomplish in his or her speech. . All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E.

Lucas. not as a question • Avoid figurative language • Limit to one distinct idea • Avoid being too vague or general McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E. All rights reserved.Slide 8 Guidelines for the Specific Purpose Statement • Write as a full infinitive phrase • Express as a statement. .

Slide 9 Write the Specific Purpose as a Full Infinitive Phrase Ineffective: Calendars More Effective: To inform my audience about the four major kinds of calendars used in the world today. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E. Lucas. .

. space program necessary? More Effective: To persuade my audience that the U. Lucas.Slide 10 Express the Specific Purpose as a Statement. McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E.S. All rights reserved. space program provides many important benefits to people here on earth.S. Not as a Question Ineffective: Is the U.

. More effective: To inform my audience how yoga can improve their health. Lucas. McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E.Slide 11 Avoid Figurative Language in the Specific Purpose Statement Ineffective: To inform my audience that yoga is extremely cool. All rights reserved.

Slide 12 Limit the Specific Purpose to One Distinct Idea Ineffective: To persuade my audience to become literacy tutors and to donate time to the Special Olympics. McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E. All rights reserved. . Lucas.

OR More effective: To persuade my audience to donate time to the Special Olympics. Lucas. McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E.Slide 13 More effective: To persuade my audience to become literacy tutors. . All rights reserved.

. McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E. Lucas. All rights reserved.Slide 14 Be Sure the Specific Purpose Is Not Too Vague or General Ineffective: To inform my audience about the Civil War. More Effective: To inform my audience about the role of African-American soldiers in the Civil War.

Slide 15 Questions to Ask About Your Specific Purpose • Does my purpose meet the assignment? • Can I accomplish my purpose in the time allotted? • Is the purpose relevant to my audience? McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E. . Lucas. All rights reserved.

All rights reserved. Lucas.Slide 16 Questions to Ask about Your Specific Purpose • Is the purpose too trivial for my audience? • Is the purpose too technical for my audience? McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E. .

McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E. Lucas.Slide 17 Central Idea A one-sentence statement that sums up or encapsulates the major ideas of a speech. . All rights reserved.

Slide 18 Guidelines for the Central Idea • • • • Express as a full sentence Do not express as a question Avoid figurative language Do not be vague or overly general McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E. . Lucas. All rights reserved.

McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E. All rights reserved. Lucas. .Slide 19 Make Sure the Central Idea is Not Too General Ineffective: Paying college athletes a salary is a good idea.

All rights reserved.Slide 20 More Effective: Because college athletes in revenue-producing sports such as football and basketball generate millions of dollars in revenue for their schools. McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E. Lucas. the NCAA should allow such athletes to receive a $250 monthly salary as part of their scholarships. .

© 2007 Stephen E. and communications. art. McGraw-Hill . All rights reserved. industry. The laser is a highly versatile device with important uses in medicine. Lucas.Slide 21 State the Central Idea as a Complete Sentence Ineffective: More Effective: Uses of the laser.

Not as a Question Ineffective: How does indoor soccer differ from outdoor soccer? McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E.Slide 22 State the Central Idea as a Statement. . Lucas. All rights reserved.

Slide 23 More Effective: Played on a smaller. and different strategies than outdoor soccer. McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E. Lucas. indoor soccer involves faster action. more scoring. All rights reserved. . enclosed field that resembles a hockey rink with artificial turf.

Slide 24 Avoid Figurative Language in the Central Idea Ineffective: Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula is an awesome place for a vacation. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E. . Lucas.

Slide 25 More Effective: Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula has many attractions for vacationers. McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E. including a warm climate. and extensive Mayan ruins. . excellent food. All rights reserved. Lucas.

and the giant slalom. the slalom. Central Idea: The three major races in alpine skiing are the downhill. © 2007 Stephen E. McGraw-Hill .Slide 26 General Purpose: To inform Specific Purpose: To inform my audience of the three major races in alpine skiing. All rights reserved. Lucas.

II. The second major race in alpine skiing is the slalom. All rights reserved. . III. Lucas. The first major race in alpine skiing is the downhill.Slide 27 Main Points: I. The third major race in alpine skiing is the giant slalom. McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E.

Slide 28 McGraw-Hill © 2007 Stephen E. All rights reserved. . Lucas.

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