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Agenda

:
What is PARRC What are the CC Standards? How will this affect us as teachers?

How can all students with special needs engage in the CC Standards?

 Partnership

(24 states and D.C.)
 Other

for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers
states are looking at Smarter Balance

In Two Years:

NJASK
As of Now:
  

PARCC

Every teacher has been given a # in NJSmart Every student has been given a # in NJSmart Every course has been linked to student and teacher.


Common Core Shifts for ELA/Literacy Complexity: The standards require regular practice with complex text and its academic language Evidence: The standards emphasize reading and writing grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational Knowledge: The standards require building knowledge through content rich non-fiction


Common Core Shifts for Mathematics Focus: The standards focus in on the key content, skills and practices at each grade level Coherence: Content in the standards builds across the grades, and major topics are linked within grades Rigor: In major topics, the standards highlight conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application

Then Don‘t Teach it!

 What

do you do now to assess your students?

Better standards require better tests – and the shifts in the standards call for critical advances in assessment quality. PARCC will develop custom items and tasks aligned to the Common Core State Standards.

20% of students who enroll in 4 yr. Colleges need remedial classes 40% of students who enroll in 2 yr. Colleges need remedial classes.

 The

plan is that they won‘t take placement classes for college. Why not?

May be set 2015 or 2016

Texts worth reading: The assessments will

use authentic texts worthy of study instead of artificially produced or commissioned passages. Questions worth answering: Sequences of questions that draw students into deeper encounters with texts will be the norm (as in an excellent classroom), rather than sets of random questions of varying quality.

Problems worth doing: Multi-step problems,

conceptual questions, applications, and substantial procedures will be common, as in an excellent classroom. Focus: Instead of randomly sampling a milewide array of topics, PARCC assessments will have a strong focus where the standards focus. This will reinforce the concept of ―going deep‖ rather than simply "covering topics."

 Each

Math question will relate to a standard AND mathematical practice.

2 Formative and 2 Summative Assessments per year (e.g. May- Writing summative; June- Machine graded)

 Lack

of formal test data.

The PARCC development process prioritized understanding the Standards and high quality instruction first. To ensure that the assessment will be based on a rich model of instruction aligned with the CCSS, the PARCC Model Content Frameworks for educators were developed based on the Standards before the assessment blueprints were designed. The Model Content Frameworks were developed through a state-led process led by mathematics and ELA/literacy content experts in PARCC member states, including teachers, higher education representatives, and members of the Common Core State Standards writing team. The Frameworks highlight key elements of excellent instruction aligned with the CCSS, and in turn, informed the assessment blueprint design.

Power Point

 AchieveNJ
 Writing

SGO‘s

A study that found of 1,500 classrooms visited, 85 percent of them had engaged less than 50 percent of the students. In other words, only 15 percent of the classrooms had more than half of the class at least paying attention to the lesson.
Dr. Michael Schmoker, Results Now

What does is look like when your students are engaged??

Deep Engagement: Students take full ownership of learning

activities, displaying high levels of energy, a willingness to ask questions, pursue answers, consider alternatives, and take risks in pursuit of quality.

Engagement: Students begin taking ownership of learning

activities. Their involvement shows concentration and effort to understand and complete the task. They do not simply follow directions but actively work to improve the quality of their performance.

Active Compliance: Students participate in learning activities

and stay on task without teacher intervention. However, their work has a routine or rote quality and significant thought or commitment to quality is not evident.

Passive Compliance: Students follow directions in a rote or
Periodic Compliance: Students‘ attention and participation
fluctuates. Harvey F. Silver & Matthew J. Perini

routine manner. Attention may be mildly distracted and they may need some added teacher attention or direction to remain on task.

CCSS.Math.Practice.MP1 Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. CCSS.Math.Practice.MP2 Reason abstractly and quantitatively. CCSS.Math.Practice.MP3 Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. CCSS.Math.Practice.MP4 Model with mathematics. CCSS.Math.Practice.MP5 Use appropriate tools strategically. CCSS.Math.Practice.MP6 Attend to precision. CCSS.Math.Practice.MP7 Look for and make use of structure. CCSS.Math.Practice.MP8 Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

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Frustration
Difficulty of Task

Boredom

Student Ability

Tracy Amerman

When a teacher tries to teach something to the entire class at the same time, ―chances are, onethird of the kids already know it; one-third will get it; and the remaining third won‘t. So twothirds of the children are wasting their time.‖
-Lillian Katz ASCD Differentiating Instruction

―No matter how hard teachers work at making it interesting, a lecture is still a lecture, and having students simply listen is still a passive action. The solution is simple: If a teacher wants to increase student engagement, then the teacher needs to increase student activity -- ask the students to do something with the knowledge and skills they have learned. Break up the lecture with learning activities. Let them practice. Get them moving. Get them talking. Make it so engaging that it will be difficult for students not to participate.‖

-Ben Johnson, Edutopia

Learning strategies and instructional arrangements that support all students also support students with disabilities.

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A set of research-based guidelines for curriculum development. Guidelines that focus on:

Multiple means of representation to give learners
various ways of acquiring information and knowledge

Multiple means of expression to provide learners
alternatives for demonstrating what they know. interests, challenge them appropriately, and motivate them to learn.

Multiple means of engagement to tap into learners'

A set of research-based guidelines for curriculum development. Guidelines that focus on: Multiple means of representation—what is learned Multiple means of expression—how it’s learned Multiple means of engagement --why it’s learned


    

Struggling students Students who receive math and literacy support English Language Learners Students with ADHD Behavioral challenges Dyslexia Student who are unmotivated

  


Math Theater Grouping the ―Class Piggy Bank‖ Updating their DRA score Chart (Celebrating Achievement) Math Contract (long term Math project) Class Store Manager ( is responsible for customer service and keeping inventory of items)

● “I do” The teacher introduces the objective; teaches/explains important information or demonstrates a new skill demonstrated (whole group mini-lesson). ● “We do” The students practice with others in groups under the guidance of a teacher to “make sense” of it. (small groups or stations) ● “You do” The students practice can explain and use the information or demonstrate the skill independently. (homework, tests, etc.)

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95% Opportunities to teach
80% Experiential Hands on activities 70% Practice 50% Discussion Group 30% Demonstration 20% Audio visual

5% Lecture

10% Read

Average Retention Rates
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If it is not in the Common Core….Don‘t teach it!

Examples:
 

Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally, ―Our is not to question why, ours is to invert and multiply‖(Dr. Severns), Always add integers ; if signs are the same add and keep sign of larger, signs are different subtract and keep sign, cross multiply up to compare fractions

 Clear

explanation of division and multiplication!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KcIi6Gyi_3M

Multiplication is an easy way to add

3 x 2_______?

multiply by adding

multiply by grouping

turn the fact round!!!!


         

Counting and Cardinality Operations and Algebraic Thinking Number and Operations in Base 10 Number and Operations –Fractions Measurement and Data (K-HS) Geometry (K-HS) Ratios and Proportional Relationships The Number System Expressions and Equations Functions Statistics and Probability

Finding the area of a triangle: US & Japan
http://www.edutopia.org/stw-assessmentauthentic-relevant-lessons-video

CCSS.Math.Content.3.NF.A.3d Compare two fractions with the same numerator or the same denominator by reasoning about their size. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model CCSS.Math.Content.4.NF.A.2 Compare two fractions with different numerators and different denominators, e.g., by creating common denominators or numerators, or by comparing to a benchmark fraction such as 1/2. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model. CCSS.Math.Content.5.NF.A.1 Add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators (including mixed numbers) by replacing given fractions with equivalent fractions in such a way as to produce an equivalent sum or difference of fractions with like denominators. For

example, 2/3 + 5/4 = 8/12 + 15/12 = 23/12. (In general, a/b + c/d = (ad + bc)/bd.)

 Working

with comparing fractions, adding fractions with like and unlike denominators.
Some kids just know the system. Some are lost.

 

 Why do

we use the Lowest Common Denominator?
1/4 + 3/8 =

 E.g.

 Illustrating

the process demonstrates that the LCD is the best way to express the sum.


Say ―Who agrees or disagrees? Why? Evidence

http://www.parcconline.org/samples/mathe matics/grade-5-mathematics http://www.ccsstoolbox.com/parcc/PARCCPr ototype_main.html

(1) research and evidence based, (2) aligned with college and work expectations, (3) rigorous, and (4) internationally benchmarked. A particular standard was included in the document only when the best available evidence indicated that its mastery was essential for college and career readiness in a twenty-first-century, globally competitive society. The Standards are intended to be a living work: as new and better evidence emerges, the Standards will be revised accordingly.

also for literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects. Just as students must learn to read, write, speak, listen, and use language effectively in a variety of content areas, so too must the Standards specify the literacy skills and understandings required for college and career readiness in multiple disciplines. Literacy standards for grade 6 and above are predicated on teachers of ELA, history/social studies, science, and technical subjects using their content area expertise to help students meet the particular challenges of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language in their respective fields. It is important to note that the 6–12

literacy standards in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects are not meant to replace content standards in those areas but rather to supplement them.

http://www.corestandards.org/ELALiteracy/CCRA/R

students must read widely and deeply from among a broad range of high-quality, increasingly challenging literary and informational texts. Through extensive reading of stories, dramas, poems, and myths from diverse cultures and different time periods, students gain literary and cultural knowledge as well as familiarity with various text structures and elements. By reading texts in history/social studies, science, and other disciplines, students build a foundation of knowledge in these fields that will also give them the background to be better readers in all content areas. Students can only gain this foundation when the curriculum is intentionally and coherently structured to develop rich content knowledge within and across grades. Students also acquire the habits of reading independently and closely, which are essential to their future success.

The standards begin at grade 6; standards for K–5 reading in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects are integrated into the K–5 Reading standards. The CCR anchor standards and high school standards in literacy work in tandem to define college and career readiness expectations—the former providing broad standards, the latter providing additional specificity.

An idea that can be used as a lens to look at the world for the rest of your life (Papert) A concept, theme or issue that gives meaning and connection to discrete facts and skills (Wiggins and McTighe)

Supporting Ideas
Terms

like ―Caesura and Enjambment‖ Formal structures like Meter, Consonance, Assonance Analyzing and explaining the meaning of poems The Great Poems of the English Language Famous poets Definitions of ‗poetry‘

 

Big Idea Taking language outside of its everyday uses and exploring that power.

Supporting Ideas
PAPER REFERENCES [Remember to double space and indent all but first lines] BOOK, ONE AUTHOR MLA 5.6.1 Kaku, Michio. Hyperspace: A Scientific Odyssey through Parallel Universes, Time Warps and the Enth Dimension. New York: Oxford UP, 1994. BOOK, TWO OR THREE AUTHORS MLA 5.6.4 Maddock, Richard C., and Richard L. Fulton. Marketing to the Mind: Right Brain Strategies for Advertising and Marketing. Westport, CT: Quorum, 1996. BOOK, MORE THAN THREE AUTHORS MLA 5.6.4 Gilman, Sandra, et al. Hysteria Beyond Freud. Berkeley: U of California P, 1993. BOOK, AN EDITOR MLA 5.6.2 Lopate, Philip, ed. The Art of the Personal Essay: an Anthology from the Classical Era to the Present. New York: Anchor-Doubleday, 1994.

Big Idea The fundamental process of research is to examine and evaluate various and diverse sources then select and synthesize these sources into an original product— effectively and ethically.

http://youtu.be/idh5-P2fmQM

Persuasion (English)—Using a variety of communication techniques to influence another person‘s thinking or behavior
Civil Rights (Social Studies)—Legal protection by a government to guarantee basic freedom and equality to citizens

Supporting Ideas
PAPER REFERENCES [Remember to double space and indent all but first lines] BOOK, ONE AUTHOR MLA 5.6.1 Kaku, Michio. Hyperspace: A Scientific Odyssey through Parallel Universes, Time Warps and the Enth Dimension. New York: Oxford UP, 1994. BOOK, TWO OR THREE AUTHORS MLA 5.6.4 Maddock, Richard C., and Richard L. Fulton. Marketing to the Mind: Right Brain Strategies for Advertising and Marketing. Westport, CT: Quorum, 1996. BOOK, MORE THAN THREE AUTHORS MLA 5.6.4 Gilman, Sandra, et al. Hysteria Beyond Freud. Berkeley: U of California P, 1993. BOOK, AN EDITOR MLA 5.6.2 Lopate, Philip, ed. The Art of the Personal Essay: an Anthology from the Classical Era to the Present. New York: Anchor-Doubleday, 1994.

Big Idea The fundamental process of research is to examine and evaluate various and diverse sources then select and synthesize these sources into an original product— effectively and ethically.

http://youtu.be/idh5-P2fmQM

The fundamental process of research is to examine and evaluate various and diverse sources then select and synthesize these sources into an original product—effectively and ethically.

Synthesize different sources of information into a unique text. Appropriately cite sources.
Draw conclusions and extend understanding of a topic by integrating the ideas of others.

PAPER REFERENCES [Remember to double space and indent all but first lines] BOOK, ONE AUTHOR MLA 5.6.1 Kaku, Michio. Hyperspace: A Scientific Odyssey through Parallel Universes, Time Warps and the Enth Dimension. New York: Oxford UP, 1994. BOOK, TWO OR THREE AUTHORS MLA 5.6.4 Maddock, Richard C., and Richard L. Fulton. Marketing to the Mind: Right Brain Strategies for Advertising and Marketing. Westport, CT: Quorum, 1996. BOOK, MORE THAN THREE AUTHORS MLA 5.6.4 Gilman, Sandra, et al. Hysteria Beyond Freud. Berkeley: U of California P, 1993. BOOK, AN EDITOR MLA 5.6.2 Lopate, Philip, ed. The Art of the Personal Essay: an Anthology from the Classical Era to the Present. New York: Anchor-Doubleday, 1994.

The Task
A friend is looking for a inexpensive mp3 player. She found one on Amazon.com and wants your opinion. Read the Review Sheet
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.7 Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic

$9.98

$9.98

1)Metal Yes or No? Blue MP3

2) Circle or underline one piece of text (an entire review, a sentence, or a phrase that persuaded you the most).

3) What reviewers would support a decision to buy the product?
4) What reviewers would support a decision NOT to buy the product?

5) Give two quotes that supports your decision, and tell where it came from.
6) Summarize two reasons in the reviews that support your decision.

7) Write a short note with your opinion about the mp3 player

Please avoid “describing”, “discussing”, and “explaining” for now.

This can become an anticipatory set  It is a benefit to all students It can be a building ground for diverse and more complex activities.

Power Point

Station Teaching

Schwarz, P. & Kluth, P. 2007

Same Concept— 3 (or 4) Ways
-Different styles (listening; reading; viewing; manipulating) -Different approaches (e.g., 3 different activities to review concept of bias in history) -Different readiness (review station; enrichment station; reteach station—students go to the station needed)

Large Overall Concept—
Chunk it and Do a chunk at each station

-Parts of a whole
- Learn more about a particular event or part; study different characters or viewpoints;

- Review for unit test

Can be teacher-led; student-directed; independent or interactive group All students can rotate on a predetermined schedule through stations; or are expected to finish all stations within a set time (e.g., 3 stations in 4 days) Can be for one class, one activity within the lesson or over several classes (e.g., students can choose 4 or 5 centers for a 5 day week; complete the missing center on day 5)

Teachers can personalize the lesson by having some students work at only some of the stations or by differentiating tasks at the stations so that some students complete more complex problems or tasks than others. Or The activities in each station can be delineated based on student need (e.g., probability activity, the student with a significant disability can roll dice and tell the number)

Short readings Web-searches or WebQuests Small group discussions Paper-and-pencil tasks Hands-on activities Small projects Independent or partner reading Cartoons Graphic Organizers Smart Board Activities Technology (Kindles, Ipods, Video-streaming, Garageband) Listening Activities

Art or drama exercises Puzzles Interpersonal reflection Mini-lessons Games Chalkboard work Brainstorming Video or DVD viewing Observations or examinations of processes or materials Models
Friend & Cook, 2003

Station 1: Students are given blue index cards with the first half of a simile and red index cards with the second half. Then need to appropriately connect the cards working as a group.
Station 2: Students are given pictures of natural phenomenon and use them to describe the actions of people (e.g. he made a mess like a hurricane) Station 3: Student are given 3 epic similes and must write a short story that uses all 3. Station 4: Students are given a list of figures of speech and must enact them and record (e.g. busy as bees).

Cause and Effect

If students go from a ―chalk and talk‖ environment to a self-monitored one overnight, they don‘t know how to pace themselves.
Teachers new to this kind of group work, often err in the direction of too little structure or scaffolding

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.10

end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, in the grades 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. When language is dense with unfamiliar syntax, such as a primary source, you can organize it into a choral reading and have students work in groups to organize choral readings.

By the

 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.7

Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.4.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, in the grades 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range

Tool 2: Audio Editing
How do we…
•Improve students’ reading of difficult informational texts? •Use primary sources of historic documents? •Teach 21st Century skills?

•Work in inclusive settings?
•Do this with easily available and ‘learnable’ technology?

Paul Revere’s Affidavit, 1783

--Full text and transcription available at the Library of Congress (www.loc.gov)

[I], PAUL REVERE, of Boston do testify that I was sent to go to Lexington, and inform Mr. Samuel Adams and the Honorable John Hancock Esquire that there was a number of soldiers going to Lexington to destroy the colony stores. I set off, it was then about 11 o'clock, the moon shone bright. I had got almost over Charlestown Common, towards Cambridge, when I saw two officers on horse-back, standing under the shade of a tree. One of them started his horse towards me, the other up the road. I turned my horse short about, and rode upon a full gallop for Mistick Road. He followed me about 300 yards, and finding he could not catch me, returned. I proceeded to Lexington...
Audacity

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.3 Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 2–3 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

In a Tableaux Vivant a group of students pose in a ‘living picture’ of an event or idea. It can be used for, timelines or events or it can be used in more abstract ideas such as the Bill or Rights or the Laws of Motion. The teacher or a student will read the ‘scene’ then freeze. You can take a picture of the tableaux afterwards.
See: Rome Wasn’t Built in a Day