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Marcelo H. Ang Jr.

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CHAPTER 6
Robot Compliance & Force
Control
Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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Pure Force Control Along a
Single Degree-of-Freedom
(Ref: Craigs Book, Chapt. 11)
m
f
x
B
e

f
dist k
e
Control of a
Mass-Spring
damper system
We model the constant with the environment as a mass-spring-
damper system. Environment has a mass m, stiffness k
e
, and
damping B
e
.

Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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Pure Force Control Along a
Single Degree-of-Freedom
(Ref: Craigs Book, Chapt. 11)
m= consists of everything beyond the wrist force sensor,
(e.g. inertia of end-effector + tool)

k
e
= includes compliance of surface contacted, passive compliance
of wrist & force sensor.

f
dist
= unknown disturbance,
(e.g. friction, cogging in manipulators gearing)
Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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Pure Force Control Along a
Single Degree-of-Freedom
(Ref: Craigs Book, Chapt. 11)
The variable we wish to control is the force acting on the
environment fe, (w/c is the force acting in the spring),
x k fe
e
=
(1)
Governing Eq is
dist e
f B f + + + =
- - -
x k x x m
e
(2)
Or written in terms of the variable we wish to control, fe, (using
),
e
k
fe
x =
dist
e
f
B
f + + + =
- - -
fe fe
k
fe
k
m
e e
(3)
Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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Pure Force Control Along a
Single Degree-of-Freedom
(Ref: Craigs Book, Chapt. 11)
Like inverse dynamics control, (computed torque), we apply a
control law
dist
e
f
B
f + + +
(

+ + =
- - - -
fe fe
k
e K e K fd
k
m
e
f P
f
V
e
f f
(4)
Where e
f
= fd - fe fd = desired force
0 = + +
- - -
e e e
f
P
f
V
f f f
K K
(5)
Resulting in the following closed loop system
Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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Pure Force Control Along a
Single Degree-of-Freedom
(Ref: Craigs Book, Chapt. 11)
But, we cannot use knowledge of f
dist
in our control law (3),
therefore (3) is not feasible.
Say, use (as control law)
fe fe
k
e K e K fd
k
m
e
f P
f
V
e
f f
+ +
(

+ + =
- - - -
e
B
f
(6)
Equating (6) and (3) yields,
Leave out fdist
(7)
dist
e e
e
f P
f
V
e
f fe fe
k
fe
k
m
fe fe
k
e K e K fd
k
m
f f
+ + + =
+ +
(

+ +
- - -
- - - -
e
e
B
B
Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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Pure Force Control Along a
Single Degree-of-Freedom
(Ref: Craigs Book, Chapt. 11)
A Steady State analysis of (7), by setting all time derivatives to
zero, results in
| |
dist f P
e
f e K
k
m
f
=
(8)
If k
e
is large (stiff), o is small, e
f
is large.

dist
f
f
e =
where
f
P
e
k
k
m
=
Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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Pure Force Control Along a
Single Degree-of-Freedom
(Ref: Craigs Book, Chapt. 11)
A better approach is to use fd in control law (4) instead of fe + f
dist
:
Equating (9) & (3) yields
fd fe
k
e K e K fd
k
m
e
f P
f
V
e
f f
+ +
(

+ + =
- - - -
e
B
f
(9)
fd fe
k
e K e K fd
k
m
e
f P
f
V
e
f f
+ +
(

+ + =
- - - -
e
B
f
dist
e e
f fe fe
k
fe
k
m
+ + + =
- - -
e
B
& a Steady State analysis (time-der= 0) yields the ff steady state error:
(9) is quite an improvement over (8).
1+
=
dist
f
f
e
dist f P
e
f fe fd e K
k
m
f
+ = +
But e
f
= fd - fe
(9)
Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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Practical Considerations
Force Trajectories are usually constants.
Applications that require constant forces to follow a specified
trajectory in time are rare.

Sensed forces are quite noisy, numerical differentiation to compute
is ill-advised. However, , manipulators usually have sensors
for .
0 = =
- - -
fd fd
- -
= x k fe
e
-
fe
-
x
Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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Practical Considerations
This leads to ff control law
fd e K x k K
k
m
f P e V
e
f f
+
)
`

+
(

=
-
f
fd x K e
k
K
m
f
f
V f
e
P
+

=
-
f
(10)
Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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Practical Considerations
Force errors generate a set-point for an inner velocity control loop with
gain k
vf
.
Some force control laws also include an integral term to improve
steady-state performance.
One important remaining problem is that k
e
appears in our control law,
but is often unknown.
assume k
e
range, and gains are chosen such that the system is
somewhat robust with respect to the variations in k.

Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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HYBRID POSITION/FORCE
CONTROL
Ref: M. Raubert & J. Craig, Hybrid Position/Force Control of Manipulators,
Journal of Dyn. Syc. Meas. & Control, June ,1981.
Concept of a Constraint Frame on Compliance Frame &
Framework for Partially Constrained Tasks.

Every manipulation task can be broken down into subtasks that are
defined by a particular contact situation occurring between
manipulator tool (n e-e) and the environment.

With each subtask, we may associate a set of constraints, called
natural constraints that result from the particular mechanical and
geometric characteristics of the task configuration.
Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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HYBRID POSITION/FORCE
CONTROL
In general, for each subtask configuration a generalized surface can
be defined with (natural) position constraints normal to the surface
and (natural free constraints) along the tangents. These 2 types of
constraints partition the degrees-of-freedom of possible end-effector
motions into 2 orthogonal sets that must be controlled according to
different criteria.

Additional constraints, called artificial constraints, are introduced in
accordance with natural constraints to specify desired motions &
force trajectories.

That is, each time a user specifies a desired trajectory in either
position or force, an artificial constraint is defined.
Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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HYBRID POSITION/FORCE
CONTROL
These artificial constraints also occur along the tangents and normals
of the generalized constraint surface; but while natl constraints,
artificial force constraints are specified along surface normals, and
artificial positions constraints along tangents. Hence consistency with
natural constraints is preserved.
Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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HYBRID POSITION/FORCE
CONTROL
Extreme Cases:
Left figure:manipulator is moving through free space
Natural constraints are all force constraints. (all forces are zero)
Artificial constraints are all position, (position trajectory to be controlled)
Right figure:manipulator is glued to wall, cannot move
Natural constraints are all position constraints. (position = constant, vel=0)
Artificial constraints are all force, (force trajectory to be controlled)
Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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HYBRID POSITION/FORCE
CONTROL
Hybrid Position/Force Controller must solve 3 problems:
1. Position Control along directions in which a natural force constraint exists.
2. Force Control of a manipulator along direction in which a natural position
constraint exists.
3. A scheme to implement the arbitrary mixing of these modes along
orthogonal degrees-of-freedom of an arbitrary frame (constraint frame)(via
a Selection Matrix S).
S = Selection Matrix (diagonal
matrix where a unity diagonal
element represents position
control in that direction, 0force
control).
Expressed in constraint frame
Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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HYBRID POSITION/FORCE
CONTROL
It is better to implement Hybrid Position/Free Control using Inverse
Dynamics in Cartesian (Task, or Constraint) space.
e x x x
F q G q q V q q D F + + + =
- - -
) ( ) , ( ) (
e
T
x
F q J q G q q V q q D F ) ( ) ( ) , ( ) ( + + + =
- - -
Cartesian space
Joint space
Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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STIFFNESS &
COMPLIANCE
Force control is difficult to accomplish with rigid structures.
One way to alleviate is with the use of passive compliance
devices.
Devices composed of springs & dampers for the purpose
of reducing the endpoint stiffness.

With such a device, certain
applications can be achieved
with pure position control.

Or better still, build
compliance in the robot
structure itself!
Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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STIFFNESS &
COMPLIANCE
The disadvantage of passively compliant device is that they are
limited in their range of applicability.

The RCC device, for example, can only insert pegs of a certain
length & orientation with respect to the hand.

To achieve a wider applicability, active control of end-point
compliance is necessary.
Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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STIFFNESS CONTROL OF A
SINGLE Degree-of-freedom
Assume manipulator is in
contact with environment
whose position is x
e
.
Environment
f
x
e
x
e
xxd

Ref: Spoy & Vidyasajars work, Ch 9.
If position of manipulator x is x>x
e
, then the force exerted on
the environment is given by
) (
e e e
x x k f =
) (
e e
x x k x m f + =
- -
(1)
(2)
Where k
e
= stiffness of environment
System is governed by
Where f is input force
Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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STIFFNESS CONTROL OF A
SINGLE Degree-of-freedom
With x
d
as shown, it is necessary to show that the PD Control Law.
-
= x kv x x k f
d p
) (
Results in a stable system if the gains are positive.
(3)
It can also be shown that the steady state force exerted on the
environment is
) ' (
e d
e p
e p
e
x x
k k
k k
f
+
=
+

(4)
has the interpretation of the desired
stiffness of manipulator
p
e p
e p
k
k k
k k
~
+
Note that for k
e
large,
) (
e d p e
x x k f ~
p
e p
e p
e
k
k k
k k
k
=
+
lim
The control law (3) in trying to eliminate the position error will then
cause the force f
e
in (4) to be exerted on the object in the steady state.
Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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Achieving Stiffness Control of
an N-dof Manipulator through
Joint Stiffnesses:
Specify a compliance frame {C} & define desired End-Effector
stiffness K
x
eR
6x6
in this compliance frame.
x x
k F o =
The diagonal elements of K
x
have high values for positional
control & low values for force control. It is useful to have off-
diagonal elements to specify the desired force-motion coupling.
Active research area: see ff. papers:
Ang, Robots in Industries: Why are They Not So Pervasive? in Proceedings of
Industrial Automation (IA) 92 Conference, Singapore, 20-23 May 93.
Schimmds & Peshkin, Synthesis & Validation of Accom. Matrices for Error Corr.
Assy, IEEE Intl Conf of Rob & Autom. 1990, pp. 714-719.
Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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Achieving Stiffness Control of
an N-dof Manipulator through
Joint Stiffnesses:
Since oX

=J(q) o q

and t=J
T
(q)F
We have
q
q K
x
T
q x
q J K q J o
o


) (
) ( ) ( =
Joint torques
Joint Stiffness Matrix
The control law to be implemented is
t=J
T
K
x
J (q
d
-q) + t
b

Marcelo H. Ang Jr.
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Achieving Stiffness Control of
an N-dof Manipulator through
Joint Stiffnesses:
The additional term t
b
can be used to provide additional
damping for stability, or to compensate for say, gravitational &
frictional torques.

) (q G
) , (
-
q q c
Need not be compensated if motion is
slow.

0 ~
-
q
In steady state, Force on environment is
equal to

x x
k F o =
as desired.