ETA Programs in a New Economy

U.S. Department of Labor Employment and Training Administration

Outline

1) National Labor Market Trends 2) Overview of the Nations Performance 3) Challenges the System faces due to Economic Changes

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National Labor Market Trends
Betty McGrath, NC Employment Security Commission

U.S. Department of Labor Employment and Training Administration

Economic Shift
• During the latter half of the 20th Century, manufacturing industries were viewed as the source of good, high paying and stable jobs • Since the early 1990’s the economy has been undergoing a shift from an economy predominately defined by goods producing industries to one that is defined by service providing industries • Since the late 1990’s we have experienced significant job losses within the goods producing industries and job growth within the service providing industries.

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Industry Classification
North American Industrial Classification (NAICS) Goods-Producing
Natural Resources and Mining Construction Manufacturing

Service-Providing
Trade, Transportation and Utilities Information Financial Activities Professional and Business Services Education and Health Services Leisure and Hospitality Other Services Government
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Total Nonfarm and Industrial Domain Annual Average Employment* 1996, 2000 and 2006
175,000,000 150,000,000 125,000,000 100,000,000 75,000,000 50,000,000 25,000,000 0 23,410,000 24,649,000 22,570,000 119,708,000
1996 2000 2006

131,785,000 136,174,000

113,605,000 107,136,000 96,299,000

Total NonfarmEmployment

Goods Producing

Service Providing
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*Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Current Employment Statistics Annual Average Employment

Goods Producing Industries
• Employment Changes between 1996 and 2006:
– Lost over 3 million manufacturing jobs – Added 2.1 million construction jobs – Added 47,000 jobs in natural resources and mining

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Goods Producing Annual Average Employment* 1996, 2000 and 2006
20,000,000 17,500,000 15,000,000 12,500,000 10,000,000 7,500,000
5,536,000 6,787,000 7,689,000 17,237,000 17,263,000

1996 2000 2006

14,197,000

5,000,000 2,500,000
637,000 599,000 684,000

0

Manufacturing

Construction

Natural Resources and Mining

*Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Current Employment Statistics Annual Average Employment

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Manufacturing Industries Annual Average Employment* 1996, 2000 and 2006
Industry Manufacturing Primary Metal Manufacturing Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing Machinery Manufacturing Furniture and Related Product Manufacturing Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing Electrical Equipment, Appliance, and Computer Manufacturing Transportation Equipment Manufacturing Textile Mills Textile Product Mills Apparel Manufacturing Paper Manufacturing Printing and Related Support Activities Chemical Manufacturing Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing 1996 2000 2006 Employment Employment Employment 17,237,000 639,300 1,647,500 1,466,800 603,800 1,746,600 591,000 1,973,700 443,200 216,300 743,100 631,400 815,800 984,500 920,100 17,263,000 621,800 1,752,600 1,454,700 679,700 1,820,000 590,900 2,055,800 378,200 216,300 496,800 604,700 806,800 980,400 952,200 14,197,000 462,100 1,553,900 1,191,400 556,300 1,316,400 435,500 1,765,000 195,600 161,100 238,400 469,300 635,900 868,700 796,900

*Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Current Employment Statistics Annual Average Employment

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Service Producing Industries
• Employment Changes between 1996 and 2006:
– Gained over 4.1 million jobs in education and health services – Gained over 4 million jobs in professional and business services – Gained over 2.4 million jobs in government – Gained over 2.3 million jobs in leisure and hospitality

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Service Providing Industries Annual Average Employment* 1996, 2000 and 2006
30,000,000 27,500,000 25,000,000 22,500,000 20,000,000 17,500,000 15,000,000 12,500,000 10,000,000 7,500,000 5,000,000 2,500,000 0
Trade, Transportation, and Utilities Educational and Health Services Professional and Business Services Governm ent
1 7,838,000 1 09,000 5,1 1 3,683,000 1 3,462,000 7,552,000 1 6,666,000 1 26,231 ,000 26,225,000 24,239,000 21 ,990,000 20,790,000 1 9,539,000

1996 2000 2006

*Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Current Employment Statistics Annual Average Employment

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Service Providing Industries Annual Average Employment* 1996, 2000 and 2006
1996 2000 2006
1 ,0 0 0 5 0 ,0 0
13,143,000 11,862,000 10,777,000

1 ,5 0 0 2 0 ,0 0

1 ,0 0 0 0 0 ,0 0
8,363,000 7,687,000 6,969,000 5,432,000 5,168,000 4,690,000 3,631,000 3,055,000 2,940,000

7 0 ,0 0 ,5 0 0

5 0 ,0 0 ,0 0 0

2 0 ,0 0 ,5 0 0

0
Leisure and Hospitality Inform ation Finance Other Services

*Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS Current Employment Statistics Annual Average Employment

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Service Providing Industries Annual Average Employment* 1996, 2000 and 2006
Industry Education and Health Services Educational Services Health Care and Social Assistance Ambulatory Health Care Services Hospitals Nursing and Residential Care Facilities Social Assistance Professional and Business Services Professional, Scientific, and Technical Management of Companies and Enterprises Administrative and Support and Waste Management Leisure and Hospitality Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Accommodation and Food Services Government Federal Government State Government Local Government
*Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Current Employment Statistics Annual Average Employment

1996 Employment 13,683,000 2,077,600 11,604,900 3,939,900 3,772,800 2,379,900 1,512,300 13,462,000 5,337,100 1,702,700 6,422,100 10,777,000 1,522,100 9,254,300 19,539,000 2,877,000 4,606,000 12,056,000

2000 Employment 15,109,000 2,390,400 12,718,000 4,320,300 3,954,300 2,583,200 1,860,200 16,666,000 6,733,900 1,796,000 8,136,000 11,862,000 1,787,900 10,073,500 20,790,000 2,865,000 4,786,000 13,139,000

2006 Employment 17,838,000 2,918,400 14,919,900 5,283,100 4,427,100 2,900,900 2,308,900 17,552,000 7,371,700 1,809,400 8,370,700 13,143,000 1,927,000 11,216,200 21,990,000 2,728,000 5,080,000 14,182,000

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Unemployment and Mass Layoffs
• Changes in the civilian labor force
– Between 1996 and 2006 the civilian labor force grew – Unemployment rose during 2002, 2003 and 2004 – Between 2000 and 2006, BLS reported that there were 122,889 Mass Layoff events. – Over 41,000 of these events were in manufacturing industries

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Average Annual Labor Force, Employed, Unemployed and Unemployment Rate* (1996-2006)
Year 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Civilian Labor Force 133,943,000 136,297,000 137,673,000 139,368,000 142,583,000 143,734,000 144,863,000 146,510,000 147,401,000 149,320,000 151,428,000 Employed 126,708,000 129,558,000 131,463,000 133,488,000 136,891,000 136,933,000 136,485,000 137,736,000 139,252,000 141,730,000 144,427,000 Unemployed 7,236,000 6,739,000 6,210,000 5,880,000 5,692,000 6,801,000 8,378,000 8,774,000 8,149,000 7,591,000 7,001,000 Rate 5.4 4.9 4.5 4.2 4.0 4.7 5.8 6.0 5.5 5.1 4.6

*Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Labor Force Statistics Current Population Survey (CPS)

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Projections
• Every 2 years BLS Releases Projections: – Labor Force – Industry – Occupation • Cover a 10 year time period • Latest projections span the time period 2004-2014

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Labor Force Projections
• The US Labor Force is expected to increase by 14 million – Represents a 10% increase over 2004 • The Labor Force will change due to composition of the population and rates of participation – Labor Force will continue to age, – Baby boomers will be between 50-68 years, – Percentage of young workers will decrease, – Percentage of women will increase, – Hispanic Labor Force will reach 25.8 million by 2014.

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Labor Force Projections*
Change 2004 -2014 2004 Total Age 16-24 years 22-54 years 55 years and older Gender Male Female Race White Black Asian All Other Groups Hispanic Origin Hispanic Origin 19,272,000 25,760,000 6,488,000 33.7% 13.1% 15.9% 121,086,000 16,638,000 6,271,000 3,406,000 129,936,000 19,433,000 8,304,000 4,427,000 8,850,000 2,795,000 2,033,000 1,021,000 7.3% 16.8% 32.4% 30.0% 82.1% 11.3% 4.3% 2.3% 80.2% 12.0% 5.1% 2.7% 78,980,000 68,421,000 86,194,000 75,906,000 7,214,000 7,485,000 9.1% 10.9% 53.6% 46.4% 53.2% 46.8% 22,268,000 102,122,000 23,011,000 22,158,000 105,627,000 34,315,000 -110,000 3,505,000 11,304,000 -0.5% 3.4% 49.1% 15.1% 69.3% 15.6% 13.7% 65.2% 21.2% 147,401,000 2014 162,100,000 Number 14,699,000 Percent 10.0% Percent Distribution 2004 100.0% 2014 100.0%

*Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Labor Force Projections

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BLS Industry Projections
• Employment Growth will continue to be concentrated in the service providing sectors • Goods Producing will continue to decrease – Manufacturing will continue to decline but at a slower rate – Construction industries will grow but at a slower pace • Several Service Providing sectors will contribute the most growth – Educational services – Health Care and Social Assistance – Professional and Business Services

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BLS Industrial Projections Goods Producing Industries

Industry Goods Producing Industries excluding agriculture Mining Construction Manufacturing

2004 Employment

2014 Employment

Numeric Change

21,817,300 523,200 6,964,500 14,329,600

21,787,300 477,400 7,756,900 13,553,000

-30,000 -45,800 792,400 -776,600

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Bureau of Labor Statistics Industrial Projections Service Providing Industries
Industry 2004 Employment 2014 Employment Numeric Change

Service Providing Industries Utilities Wholesale trade Retail trade Transportation and warehousing Information Financial activities Professional and business services Educational services Health care and social assistance Leisure and hospitality Other services Federal government State and local government

110,374,400 570,100 5,654,900 15,034,500 4,250,000 3,138,300 8,051,900 16,413,700 2,766,400 14,187,200 12,479,100 6,209,900 2,727,500 18,890,900

129,089,600 562,600 6,130,800 16,683,200 4,755,900 3,502,100 8,901,300 20,979,900 3,664,500 18,482,100 14,693,800 6,943,400 2,770,900 21,019,100

18,715,200 -7,500 475,900 1,648,700 505,900 363,800 849,400 4,566,200 898,100 4,294,900 2,214,700 733,500 43,400 2,128,200

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BLS Occupational Projections
• Total Employment projected to increase by 18.9 million jobs over the 2004-2014 period
– Professional and Related Occupations and Service Occupations will contribute the most growth – Professional and Related occupations will increase by over 6 million jobs – Service occupations will increase by over 5.2 million jobs – Production occupations and Farming, fishing and forestry occupations will continue to decline

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Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Projections All Occupations and Major Occupational Groups
Occupation Total, All Occupations Management, business, and financial occupations Professional and related occupations Service occupations Sales and related occupations Office and administrative support occupations Farming, fishing, and forestry occupations Construction and extraction occupations Installation, maintenance, and repair occupations Production occupations Transportation and material moving occupations 2004 Employment 145,612,332 14,987,482 28,543,961 27,672,566 15,330,153 23,907,026 1,025,917 7,738,480 5,747,490 10,561,681 10,097,577 2014 Employment 164,539,901 17,142,266 34,590,233 32,929,719 16,806,403 25,287,322 1,013,038 8,669,358 6,404,499 10,483,068 11,213,996 Numeric Change 18,927,569 2,154,784 6,046,272 5,257,153 1,476,250 1,380,296 -12,879 930,878 657,009 -78,613 1,116,419 Percent Change 13.0% 14.4% 21.2% 19.0% 9.6% 5.8% -1.3% 12.0% 11.4% -0.7% 11.1%

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Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Projections
Fastest Growing Occupations by Percent Change
2004 2014 Employment Employment 623,982 231,271 387,104 61,963 459,753 58,671 157,803 340,297 267,436 701,218 278,381 104,382 154,541 9,823 60,017 973,696 357,461 588,637 92,726 682,180 84,605 226,163 486,459 381,747 988,497 385,249 144,281 211,316 13,399 81,214 Numeric Change 349,714 126,190 201,533 30,763 222,427 25,934 68,360 146,162 114,311 287,279 106,868 39,899 56,775 3,576 21,197 Percent Change 56.0% 54.6% 52.1% 49.6% 48.4% 44.2% 43.3% 43.0% 42.7% 41.0% 38.4% 38.2% 36.7% 36.4% 35.3% Replacement and Growth Openings 431,464 153,418 273,144 40,282 267,888 35,723 81,813 179,812 189,084 399,619 137,742 50,687 71,994 5,889 29,022

Occupation Home health aides Network systems and data communications analysts Medical assistants Physician assistants Computer software engineers, applications Physical therapist assistants Dental hygienists Computer software engineers, systems software Dental assistants Personal and home care aides Network and computer systems administrators Database administrators Physical therapists Forensic science technicians Veterinary technologists and technicians

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Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Projections Fastest Growing Occupations by Numeric Change
Occupation Retail salespersons Registered nurses Customer service representatives Janitors and cleaners, except maids and housekeeping cleaners Waiters and waitresses Combined food preparation and serving workers, including fast food Home health aides Nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants General and operations managers Personal and home care aides Elementary school teachers, except special education Accountants and auditors Office clerks, general Laborers and freight, stock, and material movers, hand Receptionists and information clerks 2004 2014 Employment Employment 4,256,13 8 2,393,55 9 2,062,93 2 2,373,79 7 2,251,62 1 2,149,81 3 623,982 1,455,36 4 1,806,99 1 701,218 1,456,97 5 1,176,23 9 3,137,84 0 2,430,18 8 1,132,62 6 4,991,9 34 3,096,1 24 2,534,2 32 2,813,3 53 2,627,3 62 2,516,3 91 973,696 1,780,5 97 2,114,8 58 988,497 1,722,2 01 1,440,0 93 3,401,3 10 2,678,3 41 1,378,5 27 Numeric Change 735,796 702,565 471,300 439,556 375,741 366,578 349,714 325,233 307,867 287,279 265,226 263,854 263,470 248,153 245,901 Percent Change 17.3% 29.4% 22.8% 18.5% 16.7% 17.1% 56.0% 22.3% 17.0% 41.0% 18.2% 22.4% 8.4% 10.2% 21.7% Replacement and Growth Openings 2,282,9 71 1,203,4 29 778,049 890,043 1,534,2 65 1,298,3 49 431,464 515,906 648,687 399,619 586,790 485,893 958,455 1,042,3 16 524,179

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Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Projections Occupations by Replacement and Growth Openings
Occupation Retail salespersons Cashiers, except gaming Waiters and waitresses Combined food preparation and serving workers, including fast food Registered nurses Laborers and freight, stock, and material movers, hand Office clerks, general Janitors and cleaners, except maids and housekeeping cleaners Customer service representatives General and operations managers Elementary school teachers, except special education Stock clerks and order fillers Sales representatives, wholesale and manufacturing, except technical and scientific products Child care workers Receptionists and information clerks 2004 2014 Employment Employment 4,256,13 8 3,469,93 9 2,251,62 1 2,149,81 3 2,393,55 9 2,430,18 8 3,137,84 0 2,373,79 7 2,062,93 2 1,806,99 1 1,456,97 5 1,565,93 7 1,453,62 5 1,280,19 5 1,132,62 6 4,991,9 34 3,577,5 42 2,627,3 62 2,516,3 91 3,096,1 24 2,678,3 41 3,401,3 10 2,813,3 53 2,534,2 32 2,114,8 58 1,722,2 01 1,451,1 01 1,640,9 56 1,456,2 65 1,378,5 27 Numeric Change 735,79 6 107,60 3 375,74 1 366,57 8 702,56 5 248,15 3 263,47 0 439,55 6 471,30 0 307,86 7 265,22 6 114,83 6 187,33 1 176,07 0 245,90 1 Percent Change 17.3% 3.1% 16.7% 17.1% 29.4% 10.2% 8.4% 18.5% 22.8% 17.0% 18.2% -7.3% 12.9% 13.8% 21.7% Replacement and Growth Openings 2,282,9 71 1,795,8 59 1,534,2 65 1,298,3 49 1,203,4 29 1,042,3 16 958,455 890,043 778,049 648,687 586,790 579,496 569,021 524,658 524,179

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National Labor Market Trends
• Dynamic and Changing Economy
– Industry Shifts from Goods Producing to Service Providing – Changing Demographics of our workforce – Growth Occupations

• Our Workforce Development System Plays a critical role in the success of our economy
– Help to assist employers with locating and employing a skilled labor force – Assist workers with obtaining new employment opportunities – Assist workers with gaining the skills needed to compete in our dynamic and global economy
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The Nation’s Performance: PY01-PY05
• National Performance
– How has the nation’s performance changed in light of the changes within the economy shift? • Review of performance • Who are we serving? • National Statistics • Conclusion

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WIA Participants and Exiters
PY 01-05
Participants Exiters

1800000 1600000 1400000 1200000 1000000 800000 600000 400000 200000 0 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

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Participation Levels by Cohort
Adults DW Older Youth Younger Youth

1200000 1000000 800000 600000 400000 200000 0 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

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Who is the typical WIA Adult?
• • • • • Female Unemployed Low Income Age 18-54 Completed 12th grade and received diploma

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Who is the typical WIA Dislocated Worker?
• • • • • • Female Unemployed Low Income Age 18-54 Completed 12th grade and received diploma 13% of population reported as HS dropouts

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Who is the typical WIA Youth?
• Female • Highest grade attainment is 9th grade • Basic skills deficient

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Who is the typical Wagner-Peyser Participant?
• • • • Male Aged18-44 High School Graduate or GED 3% were referred to WIA services

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Entered Employment Rate
DW 89% 84% 79% 74% 69% 64% 2002 2003 2004 2005 WIA Adult

The PY 05 Adult National average negotiated goal was 78% . The PY 05 Adult National actual performance was 77%. The PY 05 DW National average negotiated goal for this measure is 82.1%. The PY 05 DW National actual performance for this measure is 82.5%. 35

Employment Retention Rate
DW Adult

90.00% 88.00% 86.00% 84.00% 82.00% 80.00% 78.00% 76.00% 74.00% 72.00% 70.00% 2002 2003 2004 2005

The PY 05 Adult negotiated goal was 82.1% . The PY 05 Adult national performance was 82.5%. The PY 05 DW National average negotiated goal for this measure is 88%. The PY 05 DW National actual performance for this measure is 88.1%.

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WIA Adult and DW Average Earnings
WIA DW

$15,000 $14,000 $13,000 $12,000 $11,000 $10,000 $9,000 $8,000 $7,000 $6,000 $5,000 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

The National DW Average Earnings in PY 05 was $14,150. The National Adult Average Earnings in PY 05 was $11,208. *This is a recalculated measure based on the new average earnings definition.

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Wagner-Peyser Entered Employment & Employment Retention
Entered Employment 100.00% 80.00% 60.00% 40.00% 20.00% 0.00% 2002 2003 2004 2005 Employment Retention

The Quarter End 3/31/06 actual Entered Employment Rate was 61%. The Quarter End 3/31/07 actual Entered Employment Rate was 63%. The Quarter End 3/31/06 actual Employment Retention Rate was 80%. The Quarter End 3/31/07 actual Employment Retention Rate was 83%.

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Older Youth Entered Employment Rate
Negotiated 80% 75% 70% 65% 60% 55% 50% 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 Actual

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Older Youth Employment Retention Rate
Negotiated Actual

84.00% 82.00% 80.00% 78.00% 76.00% 74.00% 72.00% 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

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Older Youth Earnings Change
Negotiated Actual

$4,000 $3,500 $3,000 $2,500 $2,000 $1,500 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
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Our Workforce Needs In a Changing Economy
• Examined: – The National Labor Market – The National Performance for ETA Programs • Examine Challenges the Workforce System faces due to Economic Changes

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Economic Strengths & Challenges
International Comparison of GDP Per Hour Worked in 2005

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Economic Strengths & Challenges
• Remain Competitive in the Global Economy
– Shift to a Knowledge Economy expected to continue – Service-producing industries will account for 18.7 million (or 99%) of the 18.9 million jobs generated from 2004 – 2014

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Jobs in the Knowledge Economy
By 2014: • 31% of all jobs will require Post Secondary Award or Higher Degree • 90% of the fastest growing jobs require education and training past high school • 63% of High Wage, High Growth jobs projected from 2004 – 2014 will require a bachelor’s degree

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Education Pays In More Ways Than One
Unemployment rate in 2006 (Percent) 1.4 1.1 1.7 2.3 3.0 3.9 4.3 6.8 Doctoral degree Professional degree Master's degree Bachelor's degree Associate degree Some college, no degree High-school graduate Less than a high school diploma Education attained Median weekly earnings in 2006 (Dollars) 1,441 1,474 1,140 962 721 674 595 419

Note: Data are 2006 annual averages for persons age 25 and over. Earnings are for full-time wage and salary workers. Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Population Survey.

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Trends in Median Weekly Earnings By Education

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Employment & Wage Growth By Educational Cluster, 2001-2006

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Changes in the Way We Do Business
• Demand Driven – Skilled jobs in High-Growth, High-demand Industries – Increased opportunities in STEM industries • High Growth Job Training Initiative • Community Based Job Training Grants • ETA’s Strategic Youth Vision …and now • Workforce Innovation in Regional Economic Development (WIRED) - Talent development driving regional economic competitiveness – Expand employment and advance opportunities – Catalyzing the creation of high-skill, high wage jobs

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What Does This Mean for Performance?
• Common Measures alone are not sufficient to assess performance • Additional data can provide: • System knowledge valuable to continuous improvement • An understanding of our regional economies • Support strategic planning

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Scenario
• We know that: – High skill, High demand, High wage jobs: • Require post secondary education • Are less likely to be unemployed • Workforce Investment System is charged with: – Educating and training for customers that responds to employers needs – Providing career paths that will achieve economic selfsustaining jobs

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Occupations: Top 50 National In Demand (First 10) List
Title Registered Nurses Sales Representatives, Wholesale and Manufacturing, Except Technical and Scientific Products Accountants and Auditors Computer Software Engineers, Applications Police and Sheriff's Patrol Officers Physicians and Surgeons First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers Computer Systems Analysts Electricians Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters High Growth Industry Health Care Projected Need 2004 2014 1,203,000 Average Entry Wage $37,440

Retail Financial Services Information Technology Homeland Security Health Care Construction Information Technology Energy Construction

569,000 486,000 268,000 265,000 212,000 209,000 208,000 207,000 193,000

$24,960 $33,280 $47,840 $27,040 $43,680 $31,200 $43,680 $24,960 $24,960

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Scenario (cont’d)
• PY 2005 WIASRD Data Reveals: – Approximately 105,300 WIA Adults and 44,400 WIA Dislocated Workers received occupational training • 53% trained in occupations that require On-the-Job training, High School Diploma or Less • 35% trained in occupation that require a Postsecondary Award or Associates Degree • 12% trained in occupations that require a Bachelor’s or Higher Degree

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US Top Ten Occupations PY 2005 WIA Adult & DW Received Training
Occupation Usual Education Moderate-term on-the-job training Postsecondary vocational award Postsecondary vocational award Moderate-term on-the-job training Associate degree Short-term on-the-job training Associate degree Postsecondary vocational award Associate degree Moderate-term on-the-job training Number Trained Percent of Total Average Entry Wage $28,002 $19,090 $31,271 $22,438 $45,844 $18,501 $22,431 $22,727 $31,166 $29,288

Truck Drivers, Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses Medical Assistants Registered Nurses Office Clerks, General Medical Records and Health Information Technicians Medical Secretaries Computer Support Specialists Executive Secretaries and Administrative Assistants

11,550 8,636 5,789 4,171 3,524 2,090 2,000 1,607 1,426 1,421

11.77% 8.80% 5.90% 4.25% 3.59% 2.13% 2.04% 1.64% 1.45% 1.45%

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In Conclusion…

“Workforce changes come from many angles – whether in the form of globalization of trade or an evolving population composition. Tackling these hurdles is today’s highly skilled, adaptive, and proud workforce. These hallmarks will serve the American workforce well as it meets the challenges that unfold in the future.” America’s Dynamic Workforce, US DOL

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Thank You!
Betty McGrath, Economist North Carolina Employment Security Labor Market Information 700 Wade Avenue PO BOX 27903 Raleigh, NC 27611-5903 betty.mcgrath@ncmail.net Eirik Anderson US DOL, Chicago 230 S. Dearborn, 6th FL Chicago, IL 60604 Anderson.eirik@dol.gov O’Shell Howell US DOL, Philadelphia 170 S. Independence Mall W, Philadelphia, PA 19106 Howell.o’shell@dol.gov 215-862-5298 Jackie Keener US DOL, Philadelphia 170 S. Independence Mall W Philadelphia, PA 19106 Keener.jacqueline@dol.gov 215-861-5244

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