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USING ADJECTIVES

Universidad Autnoma de Baja California Facultad de Idiomas Tronco Comn Morfologia del Segundo idioma
Equipo 2: Jess Alfonso Burgueo Robles Aileen Yanet Guzmn Padilla Gloria Judith Castro Aguilar No Aguilar Snchez Julio Alvarez Martin Ruvalcaba Avila

Stacy Kauwoh Cuevas

1. WHAT IS AN ADJECTIVE?
An adjective modifies a noun or a pronoun by describing, identifying, or quantifying words. An adjective usually precedes the noun or the pronoun which it modifies. What adjectives tell about the words they modify:

What kind: Blue sky, hot oven, small jar, old house
How many: Four bicycles, several cars, many people, few children, more letters Which one or ones: This book, that jet, these shoes, those passengers

1.1. PROPER ADJECTIVES


Adjectives can be made of nouns. Salty, mountainous and colorful are examples of these. When an adjectives is made from a proper noun, it is called a proper adjective. It is always capitalized, just as the noun is capitalized: English tea Oriental imports

American car Italian spaghetti

2. PREDICATE ADJECTIVES
A predicative adjective is not part of the noun phrase headed by the noun it modifies; rather, it is the complement of a copulative function that links it to the noun. For example, The book is big. The predicative adjective big is linked by the verb is to the noun book, which it modifies

In some sentences, an adjective is separated from the word it modifies by the verb: The day is clear (Clear modifies day) Does the water look deep (deep modifies water The scout were tired and thirsty (tired and thirsty modify scouts)
A predicate adjective is an adjective in the predicate that modifies the subject.

3. PRONOUNS USED AS ADJECTIVES


Possessive pronouns are often classed as adjectives. As you can see from the following, a possessive pronoun is a modifier because it makes the meaning of a noun more definite:

My book

His House Our room

Your game

Her rules

Its foot

Their school

3. PRONOUNS USED AS ADJECTIVES


Possesive pronouns used as adjectives. My, yours, his, her, its, our and theirs. Here are more examples of pronouns used as adjectives:

I left my sweater at school.

Miltron invited his friend to dinner.

3.1. POSSESSIVE PRONOUNS AND


ANTECEDENTS When it is used as adjective, a possessive pronoun has an antecedent. The pronoun must be singular if is antecedent is singular. It must be plural. Look at the following example:

The dog was chewing its bone


The arrow is drawn to show that dog is an antecedent of its. Do is singular; therefore, the singular possessive must be used.

3.1. POSSESSIVE PRONOUNS AND


ANTECEDENTS The arrow is drawn to show that students is the antecedent of their. Students is plural; therefore, the plural possessive their must be used.

The student have completed their exams.

4. ADJECTIVES IN COMPARISONS
Adjectives have inflections. That is, adjectives change in spelling according to how they are used in a sentence. In a room there are three people. Bob is five feet seven inches tall. Tom is five feet six inches tall. Meg is five feet four inches tall. How do we use the word tall to show th differences among them? We may say, Meg is tall, Tom is taller than Meg, and Bob is the tallest of the three.

4.1. THE FORMS OF ADJECTIVES


Most adjectives change their forms by adding -er or est. You saw how this works with the wordll. Notice that adjectives ending in y change y to I adding -er or est.

Adjectives
Old Small Shiny Big

Comparative
Older Smaller Shinier Bigger

Superlative
Oldest Smallest Shiniest Biggest

4.1. THE FORMS OF ADJECTIVES


Notice also that these adjectives are short. Longer adjectives are usually compared by the use of more for the comparative and most for the superlative.

Adjectives
Beautiful Considerate

Comparative
More beautiful More considerate

Superlative
Most beautiful Most considerate

4.2. THE FORMS OF GOOD AND BAD


A few adjectives change their forms in other ways, with completely new words for the comparative and superlative forms. Here are two important ones to remember.

Good

Better

best

bad

worse

worst

5. DEMONSTRATIVE ADJECTIVES
The word this, that, these and these, and those may be used as modifiers with nouns or pronouns to point out specific things. For example:
I like this book, but I really didnt like that one

These peas are fine, but those beans are tasteless.

5.1. DEMONSTRATIVE ADJECTIVES


When used as modifiers, these four words are called demonstrative adjectives. They tell which one or which ones about the nouns they modify. When they are used by themselves, instead of as modifiers, these words are called demonstrative pronouns: I like that. This is better.

Demonstrative Adjectives
I like this book We saw that play

Demonstrative pronoun
I liked this. We saw that.

5.1. USING DEMONSTRATIVE ADJECTIVES


We use this and that with singular nouns. We use these and those with plural nouns.

This skateboards

These skateboards

That club

Those clubs

5.1. USING DEMONSTRATIVE ADJECTIVES


The nouns kind and sort are irregular: this kind, this sort. Use these and those only with the plural: these kinds, those sorts.

This kind of car

These kinds of chocolate bars

That sort of shell

Those sorts of programs

THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME.