UNDERSTANDING BY DESIGN (UNDERSTANDING BACKWARD DESIGN

)

MRS. ESTELITA V. LLANITA
Lasallian Master Teacher August 2009

UBD

The authors

Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe

Jay McTighe

Grant Wiggins

BIG IDEA?????
 What

about the BIG IDEA?

What is the enduring idea?

What will they remember about the topic in five years?

Understanding by Design by Wiggins and McTighe: A summary In "Understanding by Design," Wiggins and McTighe (1998) lay out a conceptual framework for instructional designers.

Two of their biggest contributions are: •The "backwards design" instructional design model •The "Six Facets of Understanding"

6 facets of understandi ng

–explain provide thorough and justifiable accounts of phenomena, facts, and data

– interpret — tell meaningful stories, offer apt translations, provide a revealing historical or personal dimension to ideas and events; make subjects personal or accessible through images, anecdotes, analogies, and models

apply

— effectively use and adapt what they know in diverse contexts

6 facets of understanding 1. have perspective — see and hear points of view through critical eyes and ears; see the big picture

2. empathize — find value in what others might find odd, alien, or implausible; perceive sensitively on the basis of prior indirect experience

3. have self-knowledge — perceive the personal style, prejudices, projections, and habits of mind that both shape and impede our own understanding; they are aware of what they do not understand and why understanding is so hard

Backwards Design
– The backwards design model centers on the idea that the design process should begin with identifying the desired results and then "work backwards" to develop instruction rather than the traditional approach which is to define what topics need to be covered. Their framework identifies three main stages:

BIG IDEA

•The middle circle represents the field of content for the unit being taught. •Important knowledge including facts, concepts, principles and skills (processes, strategies, and methods) are addressed in this circle. •The question what should all students know and be able to do as a result of the unit should be asked when referring to this circle.

•The outer circle represents the knowledge that the students should be familiar with in order to complete the unit of study.

• The students will study this material during the unit and use this content, but it is unlikely that it will be emphasized beyond the unit.

•The outer circle represents the knowledge that the students should be familiar with in order to complete the unit of study.

• The students will study this material during the unit and use this content, but it is unlikely that it will be emphasized beyond the unit.

•The inner most circle represents the "enduring" understandings that will anchor the unit. •The term "enduring" refers to acquiring a deep understanding of big ideas, abstract concepts, and essential questions within key curricular areas that students will revisit throughout their school career.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

UBD PRIMER SIGNIFICANT IDEAS

Significant ideas
(

handouts will cover it…)

backward design template

 

  Identify Desired Results What overarching understandings are desired? What are the overarching "essential" questions?

What will students understand as a result of this unit?

What "essential" and "unit" questions will focus this unit?

process

1. Identify desired results 2. Determine acceptable
evidence 3. Plan learning experiences and instruction

1.Identify desired results

• What should students know, understand, and be able to do? • What is worthy of understanding? • What enduring understandings are desired? • Consider goals • Examine content standards (district, state & nat.) • Review curriculum • Expectations • Teacher/students interests

2. Determine acceptable evidence
• How will we know if students have achieved the desired results and met the standards? • What will we accept as evidence of student understanding and proficiency?

2. Determine acceptable evidence
• Consider a range of assessment

methods – informal and formal assessments during a unit , • Think like assessors before designing specific units and lessons to determine how/whether students have attained desired understanding

3. Plan learning experiences and instruction • What enabling knowledge (facts, concepts, and principles) and skills( procedures) will students need to perform effectively and achieve desired results?

3. Plan learning experiences and instruction

What activities will equip students with the needed knowledge and skills? • What will need to be taught and coached, and how should it best be taught in light of performance goals?

3. Plan learning experiences and instruction

• What materials and resources are best suited to accomplish these goals? • Is the overall design coherent and effective?

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