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Transitioning to the Common Core

Strengthening Student Success Conference
October 9, 2013
Barbara Murchison Administrator Common Core Systems Implementation Office California Department of Education Linda Michalowski Vice Chancellor Student Services and Special Programs California Community Colleges

Student Success Task Force Recommendation 1.1
Increasing student readiness for college:
• Calls for California community colleges to collaborate with the SBE and CDE to define college and career readiness, improve the alignment between high school exit standards and entry-level expectations for college-level, credit bearing work • Work with CDE to support implementation of the new Common Core and K-12 assessments • Transition the EAP to the new 11th grade assessment

Common Core Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

• The CCSS for English-Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects are organized around the College and Career Readiness (CCR) Standards for Reading, Writing, and Speaking and Listening. • Each strand is headed by a set of CCR Anchor Standards that is identical across all grades and content areas. • The anchor standards lend coherence to the document both across the content areas and across the grades.

Balanced Representation of Literary and Informational Text
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

• Kindergarten through grade 5
 10 Reading standards for literature  10 Reading standards for informational text  Writing standards that explicitly call for opinion pieces, narratives, and informative/explanatory texts

• Grades 6–12
 10 Reading standards for literature  10 Reading standards for informational text  Writing standards that explicitly call for arguments, narratives, and informative/explanatory texts  An additional set of standards for reading and writing in history/social studies, science and technical subjects

Informational Text
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

• Includes the subgenres of exposition, argument, and functional text in the form of personal essays, speeches, opinion pieces, essays about art or literature, biographies, memoirs, journalism, and historical, scientific, technical, or economic accounts (including digital sources) written for a broad audience
Source: page 33 of the CCSS for ELA and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects: Grades 6–12
• Set the expectation that students will read and write in non-ELA classrooms and develop informational/technical writing skills • Provide an acknowledgement of unique text structures found in informational text • Maintain the focus on discipline-specific vocabulary, critical analysis, and evidence across the curriculum

Technical Subjects
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

Technical subjects – A course devoted to a practical study, such as engineering, technology, design, business, or other workforce-related subject; a technical aspect of a wider field of study, such as art or music

Source: Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects: Appendix A

Critical Analysis/Use of Evidence
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

• Describe how reasons support specific points the author makes in a text. (2.RI.8) • Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and relevance and sufficiency of the evidence and identifying when irrelevant evidence is introduced. (8.SL.3) • Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases. (11-12.WHST.1.b)

Focus on Text Complexity
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

• By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 4–5 text complexity band independently and proficiently. (5.RL.10) • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. (11-12.SL.1)

Increased Student Collaboration
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

• With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others. (3.W.6) • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9-10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. (9-10.SL.1)

Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

• Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts. (K.L.6) • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. (7.W.2.d) • Determine the meaning of word and phrase as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone). (9-10.RL.4)

Increased Use of Multimedia and Technology
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

• Add audio recordings and visual displays to presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas and themes. (4.SL.5) • Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium (e.g., lighting, sound, color, or camera focus and angles in a film). (7.RL.7)

• Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., quantitative data, video, multimedia) in order to address a question or solve a problem. (11-12.RST.7)

Transitioning to the CCSS
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

• Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction • Reading, writing and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational • Regular practice with complex text and its academic language
Source: http://www.achievethecore.org/steal-these-tools

Mathematical Proficiency
as defined by the California Framework (2006) Conceptual Understanding

TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

DOING MATH
Problem Solving
Procedural Skills

Common Core Standards for Mathematics
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

The standards for mathematics:
• Are focused, coherent, and rigorous • Balance mathematical understanding and procedural skill • Are internationally benchmarked

Two Types of Interrelated Standards
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

• Mathematical Practices (the same at every grade level) • Mathematical Content (different at each grade level)

Standards for Mathematical Practice
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

Describe ways students engage with the subject matter throughout the elementary, middle and high school years 1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. 2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.

3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
4. Model with mathematics. 5. Use appropriate tools strategically. 6. Attend to precision. 7. Look for and make use of structure. 8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

CCSS Domains K–5
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

Domain
Counting and Cardinality (CC) Operations and Algebraic Thinking (OA) Number and Operations in Base Ten (NBT) Measurement and Data (MD) Geometry (G) Number and Operations – Fractions (NF)

K

1

2

3

4

5


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CCSS Domains 6–8
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

Domain
Ratios and Proportional Relationships (RP) The Number System (NS)

6

7

8

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Expressions and Equations (EE)
Geometry (G) Statistics and Probability (SP) Functions (F)


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High School Mathematics
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

The CCSS high school standards are organized in 6 conceptual categories:  Number and Quantity  Algebra  Functions  Modeling (*)  Geometry  Statistics and Probability California additions:  Advanced Placement Probability and Statistics  Calculus Modeling standards are indicated by a (*) symbol. Standards necessary to prepare for advanced courses in mathematics are indicated by a (+) symbol.

Model Course Pathways for Mathematics
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

Courses in higher level mathematics: Precalculus, Calculus (upon completion of Precalculus), Advanced Statistics, Discrete Mathematics, Advanced Quantitative Reasoning, or other courses to be designed at a later date, such as additional career technical courses.

Algebra II

Mathematics III

Geometry

Mathematics II

Algebra I
Pathway A

Mathematics I
Pathway B

Traditional in U.S.

International Integrated approach (typical outside of U.S.)

Transitioning to the CCSS
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

1. Focus strongly where the standards focus
2. Coherence: Think across grades, and link to major topics within grades 3. Rigor: In major topics, pursue conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application

Source: http://www.achievethecore.org/

California Joins Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

• On June 9, 2011 California joined the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium
 Memorandum of Understanding signed by Superintendent Torlakson, Governor Brown, and State Board of Education President Kirst  Governing state role
 Decision-making capacity

Assessment System Components
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

• Summative Assessment
• Interim Assessments

• Performance Tasks
• Formative Assessment Practices

• Online Reporting

Six Item Types
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

• • • • • •

Selected Response
Short Constructed Response

Extended Constructed Response
Performance Tasks Technology-Enabled Technology-Enhanced

Example: Grade 7 Mathematics
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

Example: Grade 11 English Language Arts
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

CDE CCSS Web page
TOM TORLAKSON
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

http://www.cde.ca.gov/re/cc
• Subscribe: join-commoncore@mlist.cde.ca.gov subscribe-sbac@mlist.cde.ca.gov • Contact us: commoncoreteam@cde.ca.gov

Transitioning the Early Assessment Program
Purpose of the Early Assessment Program Early Warning Identify students before their senior year who need additional work in English and/or Mathematics before entering college Identify Student Readiness Inform students, families, and high schools of students’ readiness for college-level work in English and Mathematics 12th Grade Interventions Motivate students to take needed steps in 12th grade to improve college readiness

CCC EAP Implementation, 2008-2013
• SB 946 authorized the CCCs to implement EAP and access student test data

• Use of EAP test results for placement of students demonstrating college readiness in English and/or math:
• • • Effective January 1, 2009 List of colleges accepting EAP results on CCCCO website: http://extranet.cccco.edu/Divisions/StudentServices/EAP.aspx As of Fall 2013, 73 community colleges are accepting EAP results and others are in discussion to adopt EAP

www.collegeEAP.org

What is Smarter Balanced?
• A consortium of 26 states and territories working together to build next-generation formative, interim and summative assessments for K-12 schools tied to the Common Core State Standards in English language arts/literacy and mathematics. • Funding from the federal Race to the Top Assessment grant (~$175M) and foundations (~$3M).

• Governed by member states on a consensus model.

Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium

26 states & territories (21 governing, 4 advisory, 1 affiliate) K-12 & Higher Education Leads in each state

Purposes and Users for the Summative Assessments
Grades Tested 3-8 and 11 Purpose School/District/State Accountability User Federal ESEA/NCLB

11

Higher Student Readiness for Credit-bearing Education College Coursework Institutions State Designed End-of-Course, Graduation Requirements, etc. Teacher/Principal Accountability State Option

9, 10, 12 3-8 and 11

State/District Option

Why is Higher Education Involved in Smarter Balanced?
• Common Core State Standards are anchored in expectations for college readiness.
• Higher education agreed when states applied for federal grant to participate in design of assessments with goal of recognizing 11th grade exam as evidence of college content-readiness. • Opportunity to improve college readiness, reduce remediation, and boost completion.

Smarter Balanced Goals for Higher Education
• Colleges and universities recognize the Smarter Balanced Grade 11 assessment as a valid measure of college content-readiness as defined by the Common Core State Standards. • Colleges and universities agree on a common performance standard in English language arts/literacy and mathematics for college content-readiness. • Colleges and universities use the Smarter Balanced assessment as evidence that students are ready for credit-bearing course work and can be exempted from developmental courses.

Expectations of Higher Education
What is Expected
• Participation in assessment design • Lead role in defining college readiness and standard- setting for 11th grade assessment • Agreement on performance standards for exemption from developmental courses in English and math

What is NOT Expected
• Use of Smarter Balanced assessment for admission • Standardization of admission criteria or standards • Standardization of developmental or first-year curricula • Complete reliance on the Smarter Balanced assessment for placement decisions (other data points and assessments may be used)

College 'Content' Readiness
English Students who perform at the College Content-Ready level in Language English language arts/literacy demonstrate reading, writing, Arts/Literacy listening, and research skills necessary for introductory courses in a variety of disciplines. They also demonstrate subject-area knowledge and skills associated with readiness for entry-level, transferable, credit-bearing English and composition courses. Mathematics Students who perform at the College Content-Ready level in mathematics demonstrate foundational mathematical knowledge and quantitative reasoning skills necessary for introductory courses in a variety of disciplines. They also demonstrate subject-area knowledge and skills associated with readiness for entry-level, transferable, credit-bearing mathematics and statistics courses.

Policy Framework for Grade 11 Assessment Results

Level 1 Level 2 Level 3

• Not Yet Content-Ready - Substantial Support Needed • K-12 & higher education may offer interventions

• Not Yet Content-Ready – Support Needed • Transition courses or other supports for Grade 12, retesting option
• Conditionally Content-Ready/Exempt from Developmental • In each state, K-12 and higher ed must jointly develop Grade 12 requirements to earn exemption • Content-Ready/Exempt from Developmental • K-12 and higher education may jointly set Grade 12 requirements to retain exemption (optional for states)

Level 4

Note: Applies only to students who matriculate directly from high school to college.

Next Steps for Higher Education
Reporting System Development States Determine Grade 12 Requirements Comparability with PARCC Career Readiness Policy * Summer – Fall 2013 2013-14 Academic Year Spring – Fall 2013 Spring 2013- Winter 2014

Validation Research Planning
Validation Research Implementation

Spring- Fall2013
Spring 2014 - 2017

Standard-setting*
Development of Reporting ALDs * Institutional participation decisions

Summer 2014
Spring-Summer 2014 Beginning Fall 2014

California Community Colleges Involvement in SBAC Implementation
• Intersegmental SBAC Collaborative to coordinate faculty involvement and discussion among the public higher education segments and K-12 • CCC Work Group on College and Career Readiness and the Common Core
• National Governors Association grant to support intersegmental collaboration

Learn More
• Visit SmarterBalanced.org for the latest news and developments • Sign up for the enewsletter • Follow on Twitter: @SmarterBalanced

Transitioning to the Common Core

For more information:
Linda Michalowski Vice Chancellor Student Services and Special Programs lmichalo@cccco.edu Barbara Murchison Administrator Common Core Systems Implementation Branch bmurchison@cde.ca.gov