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1. DEFINITION OF TERMS 2.

PURPOSE OF BOMB THREAT

3. DEALING WITH A SUSPECT DEVICE


4. POSTAL BOMB THREAT

5. TELEPHONE BOMB THREAT


6. CARRYING OUT BOMB SEARCHES

7. BOMB IDENTIFICATION

BOMB
A device containing explosives together with explosive train designed to detonate upon completion of a predetermined series of events such as dropping, impact, time influence and disturbance.

EFFECTS OF AN EXPLOSION

BLAST PRESSURE EFFECTS

FRAGMENTATION EFFECTS
INCENDIARY THERMAL EFFECT

EXPLOSION
A sudden escape of gases from a confined space accompanied by high temperature, violent shock and a loud noise.
TYPES OF EXPLOSION: MECHANICAL

NUCLEAR
CHEMICAL

BOMB THREAT
A declaration of an intention to destroy or injure the target by means of a bomb.
Usually transmitted through telephone & sometimes by written notes.

PURPOSE OF BOMB THREAT


PANIC Result to personal injury and
property damage.

HOAXES Disrupt normal activities and


keeping the security forces tired up.

- SURVEILLANCE
REAL THREAT Inflict maximum
Psychological effects to the society.

3 ALTERNATIVES WHEN FACED WITH A BOMB THREAT

1.

IGNORE THE THREAT

2.
3.

EVACUATE IMMEDIATELY
SEARCH AND EVACUATE WHEN WARRANTED.

PHYSICAL SECURITY PLAN


1. Restrict access to the facility 2. Search all personnel entering the premises, their vehicle and belongings. No one should be exempted because: a. Cleared personnel can be unwittingly used to transport explosives into the family. b. An improvised explosive device can be attached to a vehicle without owners knowledge. c. Personal belongings can be substituted without owners knowledge

PHYSICAL SECURITY PLAN (Cont. . .)

3.

Thoroughly train guards in what to look for, how to look for it, and what to do if they find something.

4.
5.

Installation of monitors/ cctvs/security lights


Use today's technology a. Metal detector b. Explosive detector c. X-ray machines d. Trained dogs

DEALING WITH A SUSPECT DEVICE


The priorities in this situation are: 1. Protect Life 2. Evacuate the immediate area 3. Notify the police 4. Consider full evacuation, based on police advice 5. Protect guest and hotel property

Minimum Safe distance from a suspect device


1. 2. 3.

Small package or briefcase 328 feet / 100 meters Saloon vehicle or car 656 feet / 200 meters Van or trailer 1312 feet / 400 meters

Note: The use of portable communications equipment such as radios and cell-phones are prohibited within 62 feet (25 meters) of a suspect device.

THE FIVE Cs
1. 2. 3. 4.

5.

CONFIRM that you have a suspect device and mark it for easy identification. CLEAR the immediate area starting with those nearest the suspect device. CORDON off the immediate area (minimum distance 328 feet / 100 meters) CONTROL all access to the cordoned area until the arrival of police and identify and retain witnesses at a safe holding area. CHECK for secondary devices, paying particular attention to evacuation route/point, parked vehicles and waste bins.

THE FIVE Ws
1.

2.

3. 4.

5.

WHAT is it? (description, size, color, if possible) WHERE is it? (location, access route, sketch plan if possible) WHEN was it found, or seen placed there? WHY is it considered a suspect device? WHO found it? Any additional information seen or heard?

PROCEDURE
1.

2.

3.
4.

5.

Assess the degree of danger, based on the information you have received. Note: Avoid all contact with the device. Inform the GM and Crisis Response Team (CRT). Call the CR24 on +44 (0) 207 939 8831. Inform the police and ask them for advice about carrying out a full or partial evacuation. Evacuate people from the building.

PROCEDURE
Remember to: a. Re-route guests away from the immediate danger area. b. Always consider that a secondary device could be located along the evacuation routes. c. Follow the safe distance away from a suspect device.

PROCEDURE
6. If partial evacuation of a tower block is required, ensure that all mechanical lifts are grounded. 7. Provide floor plans for Emergency Services. These should be kept at the evacuation point. 8. After the incident, complete an Incident Report and fax to: a. Regional Gen. Mgr. b. APAC Risk Management c. CMGL or your local insurance company

DEALING WITH A POSTAL BOMB THREAT


The points to look out for:
1.
2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Grease marks on the wrapping or envelope Smell of Marzipan or machine oil Wires or metal foil may be visible Feel overly heavy for its size Heavier on one side or in the middle Appear to be over-wrapped Incorrectly addressed, poor handwriting, spelling or typing Over-stamped for its size or weight

The points to look for (Cont):


9. Unexpected, of unusual origin or from an unfamiliar sender 10. No return address or the address cannot be verified 11. Unusual postmarks or postage paid marks 12. The envelope flap is stuck down completely 13. It is marked personal or confidential Note: The entire list above is potential telltale signs, which is not exhaustive, but does highlight some of the typical/historical indicators for these devices.

ADDRESS BADLY TYPED OR WRITTEN MISPELLED NO RETURN ADDRESS RESTRICTIVE MARKING


PERSONAL
SPECIAL DELIVERY

EXCESSIVE OR NO POSTAGE

G ENER AL GU NN FT DI XON, NY
13456

STRANGE ODOR

LOPSIDED PACKAGE

RIGID OR BULKY ENVELOPE WRONG TITLE WITH NAME

PRECAUTIONS:
OILY STAINS ON WRAPPER

REMEMBER IT MAY BE A BOMB--- TREAT THIS AS SUSPECT

NEVER ACCEPT MAIL, ESP PACKAGES MAKE SURE STAFF OR EMPLOYEES KNOW TO REFUSE ALL UNEXPECTED MAIL

RESPONSE
Although any suspect item should be treated seriously, remember that the great majority of suspect items will be false alarms and a few may be hoaxes. Try to ensure that the procedures, while effective, are not needlessly disruptive to the running of the hotel or to guests. However, the safety of guests and staff is the primary driver for any actions taken. At no time should a member of staff put themselves at risk in order to minimize disruption to the hotel.

DOS and DONTS in Handling Suspected Items


1. 2. 3.
4.

Place the item down on a flat level surface Do not panic Do not attempt to investigate the item further

Do not cover it 5. Mark the item or clearly separate it from other items for easy recognition by the police 6. Evacuate the immediate area 7. Close the door but do not lock the room 8. Staff should notify the DM/Security Mgr. (who will call the police and take charge of the incident) 9. Keep staff and guests at a safe distance (at least 54.88 yards/50 meters) to assist the police response 10. In case of actual explosion, do not tamper with the debris. 11. After the incident, complete and send the Risk Management Incident Report.

Telephone Bomb Threat


1.

2.

3.

4. 5.

Glean as much information regarding the device as possible, including location, time of explosion and motivation. Note the exact wording of the message (if possible), marking note of the date and time. Figure out characteristics of the caller including male/female, accented, background noise, old, young, etc. Alert the emergency response team (ERT) and authorities Evacuate to the secondary evacuation point.

Telephone Threat Call TELEPHONE OPERATOR: WHAT TO DO?


The receiving party must remain calm and courteous. Try to obtain as much information as possible from the caller. Take note of the following: 1. Get the identity of the caller? 2. Take note of the following characteristics; male or female, young, middle-aged or old sounding voice, accent of voice, speech impediments/obstacles or peculiar voice characteristics, any background noise; and does the voice sound familiar. 3. The EXACT WORDS of the person placing the call.

Telephone Threat Call TEL. OPTR: WHAT TO DO? (CONT)


4. Show no emotion on the phone. 5. Know the exact location of the bomb. (if possible) 6. Ask for a description of the bomb/composition of the explosive. (if possible) 7. Repeat the message to the caller whenever possible and ask for confirmation. 8. If possible, refer the caller to a supervisor or a person in authority to extract more information. 9. Apply delaying tactics and engage the caller in prolonged conversation.

Telephone Threat Call TEL. OPTR: WHAT TO DO? (CONT)


10. Take note of the exact time the caller hung-up. 11. Try to ask the caller certain questions such as; When is the bomb going to explode? Where is the bomb right now?, What type of bomb is it?, What does the bomb look like?, What will cause it to explode?, Did you place the bomb?, Why?, 12. Remember that the caller may not answer all your questions, but any additional information that he/she may relate will be helpful.

Telephone Threat Call TEL. OPTR: WHAT TO DO? (CONT)


13. It may be advisable to inform the caller that the building is occupied and the detonation of the bomb could result in death or serious injury to many innocent people. 14. Once the telephone threat is received, notify your local police at once.

Bomb Threat Tick Sheet


The Telephone bomb threat ticksheet provides prompts for questions and detail; and should be available to telephone operators.

BOMB SEARCH PLANNING


1. Determine probable location 2. Apply steps on room search procedure. 3. Apply appropriate search pattern method. 4. There must be a division of labor. Note: No radio or mobile phone should be used within 33 ft./10 meters of the object since the signal could trigger a detonation.

PROBABLE LOCATION OF A BOMB


1. Accessible to entrances and exits 2. Isolated areas 3. Vital structures of the building or installations

THREAT EVACUATION
Analyze the threat and take appropriate response / action. It involve assessing the credibility of the message and selecting one of the three possible response alternatives:
1. TAKE NO ACTION 2. TO SEARCH WITHOUT EVACUATION 3. TO EVACUATE THEN SEARCH

TYPES OF EVACUATION
1. TOTAL EVACUATION - All occupants must have to leave the place to a safe area.
2. PARTIAL EVACUATION - Occupants directly at, below, and above the location of the bomb will be the only ones to leave the place to a safe area.

LIMITATIONS OF TOTAL EVACUATION


1. RISK OF INJURY 2. RESPONSE IMPAIRMENT 3. PANIC 4. DISRUPTION OF ESSENTIAL SERVICES

5. LOSS OF PRODUCTION

PARTIAL EVACUATION
REQUIRES A FAR HIGHER DEGREE OF PLANNING, TRAINING, SUPERVISION AND COORDINATION

ADVANTAGES: 1. Effective when the threat includes the specific location of the bomb. 2. Reduces the risk of injury 3. Personnel essential to the search can remain. 4. Critical services can continue 5. Production loss can be minimized.

BASIC SEARCH SYSTEM


SUPERVISORY SEARCH - A covert technique when the occupants are not to be advised of the bomb threat. it is carried out by supervisory personnel who will search their respective areas without notifying the occupants. OCCUPANT SEARCH - An overt operation with occupant searching own work areas. Search personnel are familiar with the area being searched and are able to identify unusual or suspicious objects more readily than others. It involves danger to the occupants conducting the search. TEAM SEARCH - Carried out by specially trained personnel organized into teams. The safest and most thorough technique for bomb search but also the lowest and most expensive. It includes security personnel, trained occupants, supervisors and law enforcement officers.

GENERAL RULES IN SEARCHING


1. 2.

Divide the area and select a search Start from the bottom and work up.

3.
4.

Start back-to back and work toward each other.


Go around the walls and proceed toward the center of the room.

5.

Check that all doors and windows are open to minimize primary damage from the blast and secondary damage from fragmentation.
Evacuate the building. Do not permit re-entry into the building until the device has been removed/disarmed, and the building declared safe for re-entry.

6. 7.

BOMB DETECTION GUIDES FOR SECURITY/INSPECTING PERSONNEL


Materials/Items to watch in case of Bomb Threat related inspections:
1. Aluminum shell 2 to 4 inches in length which look like an umbrella rod. 2. Aluminum shell 2 to 4 inches in length which look like an umbrella rod with sotanghon noodle size wire that comes in pair. 3. Battery operated alarm clock (sometimes two wires protruding). 4. Black powder. 5. Oily stains, smells like gasoline.

BOMB DETECTION GUIDES FOR SECURITY/INSPECTING PERSONNEL


6. Small white beads like rice grains, lightweight with poignant odor (urine like odor). This can be contained in bottles, boxes, cans, and plastic bags. This is oily when exposed to air. 7. Spaghetti size plastic cords which comes in white, yellow, red, white, black or orange in color with powder filling inside. 8. White, grayish clay material which look like play dough contained in bottles, boxes, cans plastic bags and/or cigarette packs. 9. Unused batteries for watches, calculators or 9 volts battery. 10. Wires.

AREA SEARCH
1.

2.

3.

Exterior Search - Extends outward of about 25 to 50 feet and include the parking areas and the vehicles parked on it. 25% of available personnel Public Search - Includes reception rooms, lobbies, elevators, stairs, rest rooms and hallways. 25% of available personnel. Detailed Room Search - Includes searches of individual rooms. Minimum of 2 & maximum of 3 persons. 50% of available personnel
a. Audio Check b. Organization c. First Sweep d. Second Sweep e. Third Sweep f. Fourth Sweep

SEARCH TECHNIQUES
SPIRAL CIRCLE METHOD STRIP METHOD

ROOM SEARCH (STEP Nr 1)

ROOM SEARCH (STEP NR 2)

ROOM SEARCH (STEP NR 3)

ROOM SEARCH (STEP NR 4)

OUTSIDE BUILDING SEARCH (STEP NR 5)

VEHICLE SEARCH CAR BOMB A large explosive device that is transported to, or into a target by means of a vehicle. SEARCH PROCEDURES Starting on the outside & working into interior with the search starting on the floor & working up to the roof or top of the vehicle
Outside / inside of vehicle Lowbed vehicle Booth Door of vehicle Spare wheel Engine compartment Underneath the vehicle

VEHICLE BOMB EXPLOSION & EVACUATION DISTANCE TABLES

ATF

VEHICLE DESCRIPTION

MAXIMUM EXPLOSIVES CAPACITY

LETHAL AIR BLAST RANGE

MINIMUM EVACUATION DISTANCE

FALLING GLASS HAZARD

COMPACT SEDAN

500 lbs. 227 kgs. (In Trunk) 1,000 lbs. 455 kgs. (In Trunk) 4,000 lbs. 1,818 kgs.

100 ft. 30 mts. 125 ft. 38 mts. 200 ft. 61 mts. 300 ft. 91 mts.

1,500 ft. 457 mts. 1,750 ft. 534 mts. 2,750 ft. 838 mts. 3,750 ft. 1,143 mts. 6,500 ft. 1,982 mts. 7,000 ft. 2,134 mts.

1,250 ft. 381 mts.

FULL SIZE SEDAN PASSENGER VAN or CARGO VAN SMALL BOX VAN (14 FT BOX)

1,750 ft. 534 mts.


2,750 ft. 838 mts 3,750 ft. 1,143 mts. 6,500 ft. 1,982 mts. 7,000 ft. 2,134 mts.

10,000 lbs. 4,545 kgs. 30,000 lbs. 13,636 kgs. 60,000 lbs. 27,273 kgs.

BOX VAN OR WATER / FUEL TRUCK


SEMITRAILER

450 ft. 137 mts.


600 ft. 183 mts.

BOMBS & SUSPICIOUS ITEMS

Immediately upon locating an item suspected of being a bomb, search personnel must notify the command center. No person other than a bomb technician should touch such item.

When the search has been completed, the official-in-charge should made some announcement that no explosive or bombs have been found.

SEARCH EQUIPMENTS
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Flashlight Multi Purpose pocket knife Medical or electronic stethoscope Screw drivers Probing rod Hand mirror Masking tape Marking pen

DAMAGE CONTROL TECHNIQUE


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

FIRE AND MEDICAL SERVICE STANDBY


DISCONNECTION OF UTILITIES EVACUATION

VENTING
REMOVAL OF FLAMMABLE MATERIALS BOMB BLANKET

7.

BARRIER

COUNTER MEASURE AGAINST SABOTAGE


1.
2. 3.

SECURITY EDUCATION
USE OF AN EFFICIENT SECURITY FORCE IDENTIFICATION & MOVEMENT CONTROL

4.

USE OF PHYSICAL SECURITY AIDS / BARRIERS


DESIGNATION OF RESTRICTED AREAS SEARCHES / INSPECTION OF INCOMING VEHICLES GOOD HOUSEKEEPING

5. 6.

7.

BOMB IDENTIFICATION

MORTAR BOMB

81 mm Mortar Bomb

MORTAR BOMB

60mm Mortar Bomb

RIFLE GRENADE

SPECIAL AMMUNITION

40 mm (Grenade Launcher)

HAND GRENADE (FRAGMENTATION)

Model: M26

HAND GRENADE (FRAGMENTATION)

Model: MK2 Pineapple Shape (Blue: Practice)

HAND GRENADE (FRAGMENTATION)

Model: M69

HAND GRENADE (FRAGMENTATION)

Model: M67

HAND GRENADE (FRAGMENTATION)

Model: PRB 423

HAND GRENADE

Model: RIOT Chemical Substance

CLAMOR MINE

TEAR GAS Chemical Substance

TEAR GAS (RIOT CONTROL) Chemical Substance

Hand Grenade Chemical Substance ABC M25A2

TNT
(Trinitrotoluene)

DYNAMITE
(Commercial Explosive)

DETONATING CORD
(Commercial)

TIME FUSE (Commercial)

BLASTING CAP
(Non-Electric)

BLASTING CAP (Non-Electric)

BLASTING CAP (Electric)

COMPONENTS OF AN IED
1. 2. 3. 4. Power Source Initiator Explosives Switch

Power Source

Initiator

Explosives

Switch

THREE (3) WAYS OF INITIATING A BOMB

1. TIME

2. ACTION
3. COMMAND

SUMMARY
The (4) four components of an IED are:

1. Power Source 2. Initiator 3. Explosives 4. Switch

THE REMOVAL OR DISARMING OF A BOMB, IEDS, MUST BE LEFT TO PROFESSIONALLY TRAINED BOMB TECHNICIANS/ EODs.