Management in the „Real World”

Personal reflections of a teacher/manager
Maria Matheidesz

Quality Management for Schools and Teachers

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INTRODUCTION I had to formulate two crucial questions: • What can teachers/academic managers transfer to the „real” world of management? • Do teachers teach what our students will need outside the classroom? Quality Management for Schools and Teachers 2 .

What can teachers/academic managers transfer to the „real” world of management? • Sensitivity to needs of staff and clients–teachers’ experience in responding to students’ needs • Observing and monitoring processes – experience in lesson observation • Planning short and long term – lesson planning and course design Quality Management for Schools and Teachers 3 .

What skills do teachers/academic managers have to learn? • Financial awareness – in business everything has financial implication • Time pressure – business life is much faster than the working pace in education • Fast reactions – the market changes rapidly. quick reactions are needed as opposed to slow decision making in education Quality Management for Schools and Teachers 4 .

What skills do our students need most? • Basic requirements in a working situation are: Independence Efficiency Appropriacy Quality Management for Schools and Teachers 5 .

g. sales assistants are likely to carry out the following tasks in a foreign language: (1). employers will expect you to operate in that language in the business situations required by your job • E.Independence • When you state at a job interview that you speak a foreign language. (2) Quality Management for Schools and Teachers 6 .

g.) Negotiating (terms and conditions: discounts. payment terms etc.) Quality Management for Schools and Teachers 7 .Tasks of a sales assistant Writing emails. delivery time. customs clearance documentation. letters. consignment lists. invoices etc. special orders. agreements Telephoning Checking and verifying documents (e.

Tasks of a sales assistant (contd) Reading product descriptions Translating product descriptions Producing brochure descriptions based on foreign texts Giving presentations about trade results to stakeholders/suppliers Writing reports/market analyses/proposals Quality Management for Schools and Teachers 8 .

Efficiency • What does language efficiency mean in a working situation? The job is done well in time the first time • How are foreign language transactions evaluated? Success: if business is running smoothly Quality Management for Schools and Teachers 9 .

• If the required business result is not achieved the job is not done well. Quality Management for Schools and Teachers 10 .When is the job done WELL? • If it is done in accordance with the business interests of the company.

When is the job done in time? • Fast action is a major requirement in business • The pace of the business world is much faster than that of the classroom • Slow action often has direct or indirect financial implications • Special skills are to be acquired to cope with the constant time pressure Quality Management for Schools and Teachers 11 .

The job needs to be done well for the first time • A quality assurance concept • Tolerance for mistakes: no room for mistakes in basic tasks. room for language mistakes as long as task is performed well Quality Management for Schools and Teachers 12 .

• One day the boss is on holiday.An example • A sales assistant is used to clarifying language points with her boss to make sure that she understands everything correctly. Quality Management for Schools and Teachers 13 . • The sales assistant puts off answering the email without looking at it. • The company will have to pay a substantial storage charge for a consignment due to the delayed delivery of one document.

Appropriacy • Language used in business transactions have to meet international standards in the use of Pronunciation/intonation Specialised vocabulary Register suitable for the position of participants in the interaction Quality Management for Schools and Teachers 14 .

Discussion points • Compare priorities of skills and requirements in the real world and in the classroom? – For teachers/academic managers – For students • Which requirements are not considered in the classroom? • How could teachers prepare students for the specific requirements of the business world? Quality Management for Schools and Teachers 15 .

What to do? • Raise awareness among teachers/students of these difference • Design specialised tasks and exercises similar to real-life situations (e.g. build in a time limit) • Evaluate language performance also by task result and not only by language accuracy Quality Management for Schools and Teachers 16 .