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Tracy Amerman, Ed.D.

Professor, Department Special Education

Chris Shamburg, Ed.D.


Professor, Department Educational Technology

New Jersey City University

40 years ago.

Realtor

1,400,000

1,200,000

1,000,000

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600,000

400,000

200,000

Department of Homeland Security, Office of Immigration Statistics, Yearbook of Immigration Statistics (various years). Available at http://www.dhs.gov/files/statistics/publications/yearbook.shtm.)

Occupations that typically need postsecondary education for entry are projected to grow faster than average while those requiring a high school diploma will experience the slowest growth over the 201020 timeframe.
Bureau of Labor Statistics, Overview of 2010-2020 Projections, 2012.

1900-1990

2012

Universal give access to as many students as possible Design planning and creating activities, environments, and
experiences

Learning

growth in thoughts and behaviors

U = Universal (meeting the needs of many, but not all). Think of your universal remote. It may work your TV, media center, computer, but it does not turn on your stove or toaster. So universal meets the needs of many, but not every single student in the class D = Design (Plan). Think of a blueprint for the kitchen. It is important to plan and prepare based on your needs and anticipated challenges. Even if you do have input into blue prints or a new design, often after its completed, something may come up that you wished you thought about in the initial design. So its the planning and preparation to try to anticipate obstacles. L= Learning. Learning and teaching are not the same thing. Teaching is the imparting of knowledge, but whether students have learned it is something else. Ex. The cartoon with the dog and whistling.

1. 2. 3. 4.

UDL meets the needs of all students. Differentiation and UDL are the same thing. More teacher-driven instruction is needed. Implementing UDL in classrooms takes intensive training, PD, and lots of planning time. 5. UDL is a complex, multi-tiered classroom design methodology. 6. UDL is another initiative that is a temporary phase. 7. UDL cannot be implemented with certain curricula. 8. UDL means more work for teachers. 9. UDL is a concept the only works at the elementary levels. 10. If a student is engaged, UDL is being utilized.

View the video at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iFsRirR17oU

Universal Design for Learning is a set of principles for curriculum development that give all individuals equal opportunities to learn. UDL provides a blueprint for creating instructional goals, methods, materials, and assessments that work for everyone.

A National Imperative: National Educational Technology Plan

The model of learning described in this plan calls for engaging and empowering personalized learning experiences for learners of all ages...It calls for using state-of-the-art technology and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) concepts to enable, motivate, and inspire all students to achieve, regardless of background, languages, or disabilities.

A set of research-based guidelines for teaching and curriculum development. Guidelines that focus on:

Multiple means of representationwhat is learned


Multiple means of expressionhow its learned

Multiple means of engagement --why its learned

www.ULDcenter.org
Multiple Means of Representation 1. Options for Perception 2. Options for Language, Expression and Symbols 3. Options for Comprehension Multiple Means for Action and Expression 4. Options for Physical Action 5. Options for Expression and Communication. 6. Options for Executive Function Multiple Means of Engagement 7. Options for Recruiting Interest 8. Options for Sustaining Effort and Persistence 9. Options for SelfRegulation

Multiple Means of Representation

Multiple Means for Action and Expression

Multiple Means of Engagement

1. Options for Perception 2. Options for Language, Expression and Symbols 3. Options for Comprehension

4. Options for Physical Action 5. Options for Expression and Communication. 6. Options for Executive Function

7. Options for Recruiting Interest 8. Options for Sustaining Effort and Persistence 9. Options for SelfRegulation

Case 1: Household Vocabulary

UDL Guidelines ________________ 4, 5, 7

Ms. Fernandez teaches Spanish. She is introducing students to the vocabulary of the household. She gives students 4 different options draw a diagram, create a short skit, write a poem, or create a comiceach must include the set of household vocabulary words

Multiple Means of Representation 1. Options for Perception 2. Options for Language, Expression and Symbols 3. Options for Comprehension

Multiple Means for Action and Expression 4. Options for Physical Action 5. Options for Expression and Communication. 6. Options for Executive Function

Multiple Means of Engagement 7. Options for Recruiting Interest 8. Options for Sustaining Effort and Persistence 9. Options for SelfRegulation

Case 2: Unlike Denominators UDL Guidelines ________________ 1,2,4,7 Mrs. Kouse teaches a ninth-grade mathematics class. He notices many students have problems adding and subtracting fractions with unlike denominators. He gets a bunch of pebbles and puts them in plastic mixing cups and demonstrates adding amounts with unlike denominators (e.g. 1/4 of a cup and 3/8 of a cup). He sets this up as a station and rotates groups of students through as other groups do different activities.

Mr. Mooks Stairway to Algebra

Multiple Means of Representation

Multiple Means for Action and Expression

Multiple Means of Engagement

1. Options for Perception 2. Options for Language, Expression and Symbols 3. Options for Comprehension

4. Options for Physical Action 5. Options for Expression and Communication. 6. Options for Executive Function

7. Options for Recruiting Interest 8. Options for Sustaining Effort and Persistence 9. Options for Self-Regulation

Mr. Mooks Stairway to Algebra UDL Guidelines ____________ A 7th grade algebra teacher teaches slope by having students review common mistakes and then apply the slope formula to real life problems involving building codes.

1. A teacher is using the interactive white board having students come up one at a time to find as many coordinates (x,y) in 30 seconds. The coordinates are placed in a garden and if the student locates the correct coordinates, a little mole pops out. The teacher is keeping score and students are excited to compete.
Multiple Means for Action and Expression 4. Options for Physical Action 5. Options for Expression and Communication. 6. Options for Executive Function Multiple Means of Engagement 7. Options for Recruiting Interest 8. Options for Sustaining Effort and Persistence 9. Options for Self-Regulation

Multiple Means of Representation 1. Options for Perception 2. Options for Language, Expression and Symbols 3. Options for Comprehension

2. A teacher has 6 students in a small group using base 10 rods for place value and subtraction; another independent group of six students are each using Ipods with a money app that increases the complexity of the questions as the students build their skills; another group of 6 are working with a paraprofessional making change.

Multiple Means of Representation 1. Options for Perception 2. Options for Language, Expression and Symbols 3. Options for Comprehension

Multiple Means for Action and Expression 4. Options for Physical Action 5. Options for Expression and Communication. 6. Options for Executive Function

Multiple Means of Engagement 7. Options for Recruiting Interest 8. Options for Sustaining Effort and Persistence 9. Options for Self-Regulation

3. A teacher is working with the class on adding like variables. The problem is 7X + X=? . One student guesses 2X. Another student raises his hand and asks, how can you add Xs? The teacher tells the students, you just do. The teacher walks the students through 5 problems and then gives the students problems to work through independently.
Multiple Means for Action and Expression 4. Options for Physical Action 5. Options for Expression and Communication. 6. Options for Executive Function Multiple Means of Engagement 7. Options for Recruiting Interest 8. Options for Sustaining Effort and Persistence 9. Options for Self-Regulation

Multiple Means of Representation 1. Options for Perception 2. Options for Language, Expression and Symbols 3. Options for Comprehension

4. After a brief discussion of the controversial foot long sub, a teacher gives students the ADA requirements for volume of cereal. Students work in groups to find weight and volume of three different cereals. Each group has the same three cereals. Students must find the weight in oz. and grams of the content of each box, record their findings on a graph that all groups will record on, and either compose an email, letter, or voice mail (and record it) giving a report on their findings to one of the cereal companies.
Multiple Means of Representation 1. Options for Perception 2. Options for Language, Expression and Symbols 3. Options for Comprehension Multiple Means for Action and Expression 4. Options for Physical Action 5. Options for Expression and Communication. 6. Options for Executive Function Multiple Means of Engagement 7. Options for Recruiting Interest 8. Options for Sustaining Effort and Persistence 9. Options for Self-Regulation

5. A Do Now: Students enter their classroom and the teacher gives students index cards; on one side is a fraction addition or subtraction problem; one the other side is an answer, but not to their own problem. One student writes his problem on the board and students try to figure out if they have the answer. If so, he or she comes up to board, solves the problem, and then writes their fraction problem on the board. This only goes on for 10 minutes.
Multiple Means of Representation 1. Options for Perception 2. Options for Language, Expression and Symbols 3. Options for Comprehension Multiple Means for Action and Expression 4. Options for Physical Action 5. Options for Expression and Communication. 6. Options for Executive Function Multiple Means of Engagement 7. Options for Recruiting Interest 8. Options for Sustaining Effort and Persistence 9. Options for Self-Regulation

Q: Why do technologies like Smartboards and iPads often fail to be effectively implemented in schools and not produced desired results?

A: The lack of a systems approach.

A system is a group of interacting, interrelated, and interdependent components that form a complex and unified whole.
A business A city A bathtub A forest A family A school A classroom

Media born of the communications revolution which can be used for instructional purposes.

Instructional technology goes beyond any particular medium or device. It is a systematic way of designing, carrying out, and evaluating the whole process of learning.

US Commission on Instructional Technology, 1970

Machine View

Systems View

A technocentric approach focuses on a technology. A systemic approach, in contrast to a technocentric one, is concerned with the learning culture. --Papert

Technocentric: What can a SmartBoard do?

Systemic: How does a classroom change with a Smartboard?

One Answer is STATIONS!

Stations are spots in the classroom where small groups of students can work on various tasks simultaneously

Can be teacher-led; student-directed; independent or interactive group All students can rotate on a predetermined schedule through stations; or are expected to finish all stations within a set time (e.g., 3 stations in 4 days) Can be for one class, one activity within the lesson or over several classes (e.g., students can choose 4 or 5 centers for a 5 day week; complete the missing center on day 5)

Station 1: Students work with the teacher to learn about probability; the teacher answers questions and challenges each student with problems and questions. Station 2: students solve probability problems from the textbook Station 3: students as a group generate a list of real-world applications for probability; they can technology for research Station 5: students complete probability scenarios at SmartBoard; the file is saved for assessment Station 6: student use hands-on (cards, dice) and create probability Q & As

CCSS.Math.Content.5.NF.A.1 Add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators (including mixed numbers) by replacing given fractions with equivalent fractions in such a way as to produce an equivalent sum or difference of fractions with like denominators.

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Station 1: Students will complete a worksheet with the teachers assistance, if needed. Station 2: Students will make a stone soup recipe and adjust for different size groups.

Station 3: Students will make a short video explaining the LCD of different problems, starting simple and getting more difficult
Station 4: Students will complete SmartBoard activity where they have to mix different amounts of nuts.

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Short readings Web-searches or WebQuests Small group discussions Paper-and-pencil tasks Hands-on activities Small projects Independent or partner reading Cartoons Graphic Organizers Smart Board Activities Technology (Kindles, Ipods, Video-streaming, Garageband) Listening Activities

Art or drama exercises Puzzles Interpersonal reflection Mini-lessons Games Chalkboard work Brainstorming Video or DVD viewing Observations or examinations of processes or materials Puddle Questions Models
Friend & Cook, 2003

Students need training in on strategies for station and group work: -Remind students to read directions -Go over strategies for staying on track during stations; use an agreed upon signal to remind them to ask themselves, Am I on track? This can be anything from a verbal question to a symbol of some sort that you place at the station at times as they work -Have some sort of assessment at each station and consider providing incentives for station completion

- In timed stations, set a timer to go off 5 minutes before the activity is to be finished - Begin with small, timed opportunities for group work that include a feedback session about the process - Teacher(s) rotates and stops at each group for 5-10 minutes to check what is going on - In teacher-led stations, teachers repeat instructions to each group that comes through - Build in student supports and checkpoints along the way

When one secondary teacher uses stations, she spends time teaching the rules for each of her four station types. Ex: Reading independently for 20 minutes at a station:
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Behavioral expectations How to choose a book What to do if the book does not work for you How to record what you are reading Where to sit What to do if someone is keeping you from your reading That reading is a quiet activity That wandering around (bathroom breaks, visiting with friends in other stations) is absolutely not reading 9. And, anything else that appears to be a problem 10. Develop a scoring guide or rubric based on student work, (in this case, observing good readers and those who are not)
Middle Web Listserv conversation, http://www.middleweb.com?MWLISTCONT/MSLcenters.html

You cannot do something sequential as there is no order to the stations Create groups who will travel through the stations or the station can move through the groups.
Heterogeneous in literacy skills Personalities that mesh (common interests?) Pay attention to students who interact well together; placement of outcasts and bullies?

Retain right to change groups if misbehavior interferes with activity Consider making a station outside of the classroom the gym, an empty room, outside, the auditorium (if you have the supervision or co-teacher)

Inclusion Universal Design for Learning Engagement Systems, Technology, and Tools Station Teaching