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Concept of Word in Text Instruction

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About me…
• • • • • • • • Grew up on a farm in NC Married 43 years, 1 son, 0 grandkids 15 years classroom teacher, PreK-3rd 10 years reading specialist, elementary 2 years AP 6 years principal In 10th year in Spotsy, now PreK-5 Lit Coord. So this is 43rd year as educator

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Today you will:
• Learn about Concept of Word • Learn how classroom teachers teach COW • Discuss ways we can support this instruction

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Background Info
• PALS - Phonological Awareness Literacy Screening • PALS K Assessment – Rhyme Awareness – Beginning Consonant Awareness – Alphabet Awareness – Letter Sounds (26 – not M, Q, X; includes sh, th, ch) – Spelling – Concept of Word – Word Recognition in Isolation (optional)
© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Background Info
• PALS 1-3 Assessment
– Spelling – Word Recognition in Isolation – Oral Reading in Context
• • • • Accuracy Rate Comprehension Fluency – phrasing and expression rubric

If indicated, go back and assess skills from PALS K
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Reflect
Think (1 minutes) Is this what you thought PALS was? What aspects were confirmed? What surprised you? Pair (2 minutes) Share your thinking with a shoulder partner Share (3 minutes) Share any “AhHa’s” with whole group
© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Reports
• Teachers, reading specialists, principals have pass words to access all student data • Work with classroom teachers to get the detail you need/want to support what they are doing • PALS provides very explicit data!

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Today’s focus: COW
Why? -Skills with which we’re already great -PALS Office research -Holds for our students

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Let’s build background…
• Read the article, “Concept of Word in Text: An Integral Literacy Skill” to the bottom of P. 32, stopping at “Using PALS Scores….” • As you read about the stages of development, visualize what a child at each stage (developing, rudimentary, and firm) would look like reading aloud with words on a chart in front of him
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Let’s See Each Stage…
• Developing Clip After watching, turn and talk: What did you notice? • Rudimentary Clip After watching, turn and talk: What did you notice? • Firm Clip After watching, turn and talk: What did you notice?
© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Isolate beginning consonants
Immediately recognize letter sounds

Remember words in isolation that were previously seen in context

Concept of Word in text

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Developing Rudimentary

Firm

Concept of Word in text Continuum
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Instructional transparency

COW assessment

COW instruction

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Concept of Word Task Memorizing the rhyme Model finger-point reading Word ID in context Word ID in isolation

COW Lesson Framework Memorizing the rhyme Model finger-point reading Word ID in context Word ID in isolation

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Concept of Word in text
A Whole-to-Part Framework

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Group Size
• Individual • Small group • Whole group

Time
• 10 – 15 minutes • 5 days a week

Materials
• Picture representation of a rhyme/text • Chart paper or big book • Individual copies (text copy or book) • Word cards

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Let’s talk texts …

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Use a variety of …
• Nursery rhymes • Jump rope jingles • Songs
Just make sure the text is not one used on PALS assessments! (Humpty Dumpty, Rain, There Was a Little Turtle) Double check with kinder teachers, please!

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Step One: Teach the rhyme

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1. Use a picture representation of the nursery rhyme.
2. Model how to recite the nursery rhyme several times. Point to each picture while reciting the rhyme. 3. Ask the students to point to each picture as they: a) Choral read the rhyme with you b) Echo read the rhyme picture by picture c) Recite the rhyme independently

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Repeat this instructional sequence until the student can recite the rhyme “by heart.”

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Step Two: Finger-point reading

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1. Using the text copy of the nursery rhyme, read the rhyme to students while pointing to each word. 2. Choral read the rhyme. Say –
Now let’s read it together. Eyes on the page. Read it with me as I point to each word.

3. Echo read the rhyme, line by line. Say Now we will take turns reading each line of the rhyme. First I’ll read a line and touch each word. Then you will read the same line and touch each word. Ready?

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

4. Read the rhyme to students while pointing to each word. 5. Invite one student to recite the rhyme while pointing to the words of the nursery rhyme. Say This time I want you to do what I did. Point to each word as you say the rhyme. Be sure to touch each word as you say it.

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Step Three: Word identification in context

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1. After repeated readings of the nursery rhyme text, point to several words from the text and ask What word is this?

• Model how to voice point or read through the entire rhyme to figure out the target word. • Model how to use knowledge of beginning sounds and letters to identify the target word.

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Scaffold the lesson by modeling how to use voice pointing and beginning sounds to identify the word.

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

1. Model how to voice point

What word is this?

Sam, Sam the baker The mouse went up man. the clock.

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

2. Model how to use beginning sound
What word is this?

The mouse went up man. the clock. Sam, Sam the baker

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Step Four: Developing word recognition

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1. Select several words from the nursery rhyme and write them on index cards. 2. Ask students to match each word card to its counterpart in the text of the rhyme. 3. Once the match is made, ask –
How did you know that was the same word?

• Continue to ask until the student can tell you that they used the first letter and letter sound as clues to identify the word.

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Electronic Lesson Plans (ELP)

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ELP for Emergent Readers
Eight new Concept of Word nursery rhymes!

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• • • • •

Day 1 – Introduce the Whole Day 2 – Work with Parts (Sentences) Day 3 – Work with Parts (Words) Day 4 – Work with Parts (Letters and Sounds) Day 5 – Review the Whole and Assess the Parts

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

The link to word recognition …
Emergent Reader

Beginning
Reader

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What is a sight word?
mouse

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Linguistic identities of words
orthographic

semantic

phonologic mouse

syntactic

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Did you know?
Students need 12-13 meaningful interactions with words, in order for words to stick in their memories.

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Meaningful interactions

Whole

Part

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Examples of meaningful interactions
Text (reading)

Oral

Writing

Harvest word bank words from these interactions!
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Word Banks
• Group • Personal

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How to choose words:
• • • • concrete high imagery decodable high frequency

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Word Bank Activities
In text
Emergent Readers

Out of text
Beginning Readers

Beginning Readers
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Differentiating COW activities
Developing Rudimentary Firm

Target beginning Target beginning Target beginning consonants consonants and and final digraphs consonants, digraphs, and blends

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Word bank activities in text
I’m thinking of … Cloze

Adjust prompts by letter sound and beginning sound knowledge Matching Highlighting

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Activity One: I’m Thinking of …
I’m thinking of a word that begins like “mmmouse.” Find the word that begins like “mouse.”

Five little monkeys sitting on the bed. One jumped off and bumped his head.
What’s the word? How did you know? That’s right! It has an “m”! What sound is that? Can you point to the word? Yes, mouse and monkey both start with “m,” the /m/ sound.
© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Two: Cloze

Let’s read the rhyme again. I’ve covered up some of the letters. See if you can guess the word.

Hickory Dickory Dock The mouse ran up the clock. The clock struck one, The mouse ran down, Hickory Dickory Dock.

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Activity Three: Matching
Pick up a word that starts with /m /. Match the word to its pair in the sentence.

mouse mouse one

clock
duck

mouse

Hickory Dickory Dock The mouse ran up the clock. The clock struck one, The mouse ran down, Hickory Dickory Dock.

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Four: Highlighting

Highlight all the words that start with /d/.

Five little ducks went out one day, Over the hill and far away. Mother duck said, “Quack, quack, quack, quack.” But only four little ducks came back.

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Word bank activities out of text
Pick-up Sorting

Adjust prompts by letter sound and beginning sound knowledge

Matching

Writing

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Activity One: Pick-up
Pick-up all the words that start like “ship.”

?

shop

mom

shut

dog

hill sheep

duck

mouse

sock

that

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Activity Two: Sorting
B M

Sort, check, reflect!

R

bat mouse ball run man
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Activity Three: Matching

clock

that
Free space!

duck

Put a bingo chip on each one of the words that I call out!

mouse

one

sheep

ball

little

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Four: Writing
dog
Use your word bank words to make a sentence.

ship

and
that the red

man
mom dog

jog

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Jot to Jog
• Jot down three ideas of ways you can support teachers as their kindergartners develop concept of word • Share your ideas with three others in a quartet • Select one idea from the quartet to share with the entire group

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

QUESTIONS?

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

THANKS FOR YOUR ATTENTION – AND SUPPORT!!
If you need me, feel free to contact me – fgentry@spotsylvania.k12.va.us 834-2500 X 1113

© 2010 by The Rector and The Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.