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Reading Apprenticeship®: Making the Invisible Visible to our students FTLA 2014 Text and Task Analysis Setting Literacy Goals

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Dimensions of Reading Apprenticeship

Consider Schema
• World/ Personal: Schema from your lived day to day experience • Text: Schema about how different text forms and genres are structured • Discipline: Schema learned as a result of school; specialized knowledge • Language: Schema about how words are built and fit with other words

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Planning to embed literacy goals
• If you have a current course text with you, get it out now. • You will get to take turns being an expert and a novice in this activity.

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Trade texts with a partner from another discipline
• Read the unfamiliar text and capture your reading process, asking yourself as a reader:

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– What strategies did I use to make meaning from or negotiate the text? – What schema knowledge did I bring to the text?

• And asking yourself as a teacher:
– What challenges might students encounter when grappling with this text?

With your partner, take a closer look at Text #1
• Discuss the “novice” partner’s experience reading the text and consider with one another what challenges students might have with the text.
• Make notes on the Text and Task notetaker.

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Still with Text #1
• Choose a key chunk of text, one that:
– Contains an important concept; or – Is particularly challenging; or – Speaks to an instructional goal in terms of content or literacy.

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• “Novice” does a Think Aloud with the chunk of text while “Expert” takes notes

Articulate literacy goals for text #1
• What RA routine might be most helpful for students to use when grappling with this text? • What kinds of supports can you design to build on students’ strengths and extend their fluency, stamina, and comprehension as a reader of texts in your discipline.

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Time to take a closer look at Text #2
• Discuss the “novice” partner’s experience reading the text and consider with one another what challenges students might have with the text. • Make notes on the Text and Task notetaker.

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Still with Text #2
• Choose a key chunk of text, one that:
– Contains an important concept; or – Is particularly challenging; or – Speaks to an instructional goal in terms of content or literacy.

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• “Novice” does a Think Aloud with the chunk of text while “Expert” takes notes

Articulate literacy goals for text #2
• What RA routine might be most helpful for students to use when grappling with this text? • What kinds of supports can you design to build on students’ strengths and extend their fluency, stamina, and comprehension as a reader of texts in your discipline.

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Debrief Activity
• Having any “novice” reader make their thinking visible with a text that falls within your “expert blind spot” is usually a very eye-opening experience! • When we read with students in mind, we can plan to support literacy acquisition as we teach towards our content matter.

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Lesson planning to support both content and literacy goals

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Our Goals with Reading Apprenticeship:
• Help students learn to read and think like insiders (experts) in a subject area • Overcome our own expert blind spot – blending subject-area knowledge with important understandings of how novices acquire the conventions, rituals, and expectations of discourse in that field

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RA helps to develop more powerful readers
• Engaging students in more reading– for recreation, subject-area learning, and selfchallenge • Making the teacher’s discipline-based reading processes visible to the students; • Making students’ reading processes, motivations, strategies, knowledge, and understanding visible to the teacher and to one another.

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• Helping students gain insight into their own reading processes; and • Helping them develop a repertoire of problem solving strategies for overcoming obstacles and deepening comprehension of texts from various academic disciplines

In a Reading Apprenticeship Classroom, one will notice:
• The teacher briefly modeling to make his or her thinking visible
• The students engaging in guided practice of what the teacher has modeled • Students talking with one another about their experiences with the reading

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In Reading Apprenticeship Classrooms, Teachers
• Focus on comprehension and metacognitive
conversation • Create a climate of collaboration • Provide appropriate support while

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emphasizing student independence

This conversation is a critical dynamic in the classroom:
• Students learn from the teacher and from each other new ways to engage with and comprehend academic text. • Teachers learn from students what they are currently doing to make sense of a text, what knowledge they bring to the text, and what difficulties they are having.

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The metacognitive conversation provides a

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powerful and productive window: • For students, into the teacher’s and other students’ reading processes, so they can broaden their repertoire of strategies and deepen their subject area knowledge. • For teachers into students’ reading processes, so they can plan instruction to focus on students’ actual learning needs.

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