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Selected Poems of William Wordsworth

By: Christine Yoon Shloka Joshi

My Heart Leaps Up
My heart leaps up when I behold A rainbow in the sky: So was it when my life began; So is it now I am a man; So be it when I shall grow old, Or let me die! The Child is father of the Man; And I could wish my days to be Bound each to each by natural piety.

.My Heart Leaps Up My heart leaps up when I behold A rainbow in the sky: Wordsworth expresses his desire to be a part of the rainbow and its magnificence.

. So is it now I am a man. This line insinuates that Wordsworth found life to be beautiful and still believes so to this day.My Heart Leaps Up So was it when my life began.

. Or let me die! Wordsworth claims that he would rather die than lose his wonder of the world.My Heart Leaps Up So be it when I shall grow old.

My Heart Leaps Up The Child is father of the Man. The man is made from childhood experiences . This line suggests that the child produces the man.

Wordsworth hopes that he will always appreciate the wonders of nature throughout his life.My Heart Leaps Up And I could wish my days to be Bound each to each by natural piety. .

Rhyme and Theme • This poem is a lyrical ballad • The rhyme scheme in this poem is ABCCABDE • The theme of this poem is the appreciation of nature and the idea of Romanticism .Type.

Literary Devices • Paradox. .“The Child is father of the Man” Wordsworth is seeing nature as if he were a child again. rather than the man made ones. and it makes him happy to see the natural wonders of the world.most important concept in this poem line 7.

Symbolism • The concept of the rainbow can be construed as hope. . • The poem as a whole is symbolic of the beauty of nature and Romanticism. or Valhalla. one for dead heroes to cross to reach paradise. • Some cultures believe that the rainbow is a bridge to the afterlife. promises or even a fulfilled dream.

or gently pass! Alone she cuts and binds the grain. Breaking the silence of the seas Among the farthest Hebrides. No Nightingale did ever chant More welcome notes to weary bands Of travelers in some shady haunt. Yon solitary Highland Lass! Reaping and singing by herself. O listen! for the Vale profound Is overflowing with the sound. Stop here.The Solitary Reaper Behold her. single in the field. And sings a melancholy strain. Among Arabian sands: A voice so thrilling ne'er was heard In spring-time from the Cuckoo-bird. .

Long after it was heard no more. loss. . unhappy. And battles long ago: Or is it some more humble lay. I saw her singing at her work. faroff things. as I mounted up the hill The music in my heart I bore. and may be again? Whate'er the theme. That has been. And o'er the sickle bending. motionless and still. Familiar matter of to-day? Some natural sorrow. or pain. And. the Maiden sang As if her song could have no ending.The Solitary Reaper Will no one tell me what she sings?-.Perhaps the plaintive numbers flow For old. -.I listened.

The Solitary Reaper Behold her. as if not to disturb her. single in the field. . He tells us to stop or gently pass. Yon solitary Highland Lass! Reaping and singing by herself. Stop here. Wordsworth is telling the audience to listen to a woman who is singing to herself. or gently pass! In this line.

Wordsworth illustrates the woman reaping and singing a sad song. And sings a melancholy strain. . He tells the audience how the valley is filled with the beautiful sound.The Solitary Reaper Alone she cuts and binds the grain. O listen! for the Vale profound Is overflowing with the sound.

The Solitary Reaper No Nightingale did ever chant More welcome notes to weary bands Of travelers in some shady haunt. Among Arabian sands: The woman’s voice cannot be compared to a nightingale. who is welcoming weary travelers. .

the Cuckoo-bird’s voice was not as thrilling as the woman’s voice. . That even in the springtime.The Solitary Reaper A voice so thrilling ne'er was heard In spring-time from the Cuckoo-bird. Breaking the silence of the seas Among the farthest Hebrides.

sad things.The Solitary Reaper Will no one tell me what she sings?-Perhaps the plaintive numbers flow For old. far-off things. And battles long ago Wordsworth wonders what she might be singing about. unhappy. . He guesses that she is singing about old. perhaps battles.

That has been. loss. such as things of today. or pain. . and may be again? The woman’s song might be of more humble things.The Solitary Reaper Or is it some more humble lay. Familiar matter of to-day? Some natural sorrow.

The Solitary Reaper Whate'er the theme. the Maiden sang As if her song could have no ending. Whatever she might be singing about. he is captivated by the woman’s singing during her work. And o'er the sickle bending. I saw her singing at her work. .

Long after it was heard no more. motionless and still. . Wordsworth carries the memory of her song even after he has passed her. as I mounted up the hill The music in my heart I bore.The Solitary Reaper I listened. And.

• Idyll: lyric poetry describing the life of the shepherd in pastoral.Anaylsis • • • • • Four eight-line stanzas each ending with a couplet octosyllabic lines written in iambic tetrameter Each stanza follows a rhyme scheme of ABABCCDD. though in the first and last stanzas the "A" rhyme is off (field/self and sang/work). . bucolic. idealistic terms.

Analysis • the first stanza sets the scene • the second offers two bird comparisons for the music • the third wonders about the content of the songs • the fourth describes the effect of the songs on the speaker .