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This is what it is all about.

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Introductions
Split into groups

One person introduces each member of the

group, their role at OCS, and all the different ways that members are involved with the prevention of child abuse and neglect.

Strengthening Families Alaska


A New Evidence-Based Child Maltreatment Prevention Strategy The Child Welfare Academy

The Strengthening Families Initiative


Developed by the Center for the Study of Social Policy www.cssp.org
National Expansion with the assistance of the National Alliance of Childrens Trust and Prevention Funds www.ctfalliance.org

Funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation

Just the facts


Research Questions With families, what already works? What family characteristics promote childrens healthy development and link directly to reducing the risk of child abuse and neglect?

The Protective Factors Framework


Parental Resilience Social Connections Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development Concrete Support in Times of Need Social and Emotional Development

Early Care & Education Physical Health


Primary healthcare Health promotion activities Education Screening

Domestic Violence
Safety planning Shelter

Counseling

Targeted special needs programs

Screening and assessment Early intervention services

Families & Mental Health Consultation Protective Counseling Factors

Childrens Mental Health

Parent/ child Home activities Assessment visits Support Safety Plng Group Grps activities Substance Parent Ed. Abuse trtmt

Family Resource Centers

Child Welfare

Home visiting programs

Real Results:
Systems

at state and national level are incorporating child abuse prevention goals and strategies across multiple disciplines to allow better collaboration. programs and parent leaders are using the same framework to strengthen local programs and local community approaches to supporting families with young children.

Local

Center
for the

Study
of

Social
Policy

Protective Factors
are based on building resiliency rather than reducing risk

Well-being

Protective Capacities Intellectual skills Emotional skills Physical care skills Motivations to protect Social connections Resources such as income, employment or housing

Protective Factors Parental resilience Social connections Knowledge of parenting and child development Concrete support in times of need Social and emotional competence of children

Permanence

Protective Capacities
are concrete and identifiable behaviors, emotions, social connections and resources necessary for insuring child safety. Source: Child Welfare Institute

Safety

Initial Assessment Case Example


1.

2.

3.

Read Case Example to enhance discussion for the following slides that outline the 5 protective factors. As we go through the slides, we will use this Initial Assessment Case Example to think about how Protective Factors might help guide our work with the family. We will also use the example to help us think about how we or other agencies might have assisted the family sooner.

Parental Resilience

Parental Resilience
Psychological health; parents feel supported and able to solve problems; can develop trusting relationships with others and reach out for help Parents who did not have positive childhood experiences or who are in troubling circumstances need extra support and trusting relationships

Social Connections

Social Connections
Relationships with extended family, friends, co-workers, other parents with children similar ages

Community norms are developed through social connections


Mutual assistance networks: child care, emotional support, concrete help

Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development

Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development


Basic information about how children develop Basic techniques of developmentally appropriate discipline
Alternatives to parenting behaviors experienced as a child

Help with challenging behaviors

Concrete Supports in Times of Need

Concrete Supports
Response to a crisis: food, clothing, shelter

Assistance with daily needs: health care, job opportunities, transportation, education Services for parents in crisis: mental health, domestic violence, substance abuse Specialized services for children

Strengthening Families: Creating a New Normal


The Strengthening Families Approach:
Benefits ALL families Builds on family strengths, buffers risk, and promotes better outcomes Can be implemented through small but significant changes in everyday actions Builds on and can become a part of existing programs, strategies, systems and community opportunities

Levers
Community and multisystem leaders act to build sustainable infrastructure through key levers for change:
Parent Partnerships Policy/Systems Professional Development

Strategies
Community programs and worker practice consistently:

Protective Factors
Families and communities build protective factors that also promote healthy outcomes: Parental resilience Social connections Knowledge of parenting and child development Concrete support in times of need Social and emotional competence of children

Results
Strengthened families Optimal child development

Facilitate friendships and mutual support

Strengthen parenting
Respond to family crises Link families to services and opportunities Value and support parents Further childrens social and emotional development Observe and respond to early warning signs of abuse and neglect

Reduced child abuse & neglect

A New Normal
Families and communities, service systems and organizations: Focus on building protective and promotive factors to reduce risk and create optimal outcomes for children, youth and families Recognize and support parents as decision makers and leaders Value the culture and unique assets of each family Are mutually responsible for better outcomes for children, youth and families

Social and Emotional Competence

Social and Emotional Competence


Normal development (like using language to express needs and feelings) creates more positive parentchild interactions Challenging behaviors, traumatic experiences or development that is not on track require extra adult attention

A Surprise: What children learn in school or other programs goes home to their families

Case Plan Brainstorm


Use Protective Factors to help you brainstorm about how to case plan with the Johnson Family. What kind of goals, objectives, and activities would link to building protective factors in the family? For PCA: How do protective factors support enhancing protective capacities?

Small but significant changes in everyday practices can produce huge results in preventing child abuse and neglect for young children and helping families stay strong even under stress

Strengthening Families Program and Early Childhood Interventions


Infants,

Toddlers, Preschoolers Vulnerability/ Interventions Laws and policy

ALASKA
In October of 2010, 49% of children with a substantiated allegation of maltreatment were between birth and five years of age

EARLY YEARS MATTER!


90%

of brain development takes places before the age of 3 Early brain development determines continued development
Jack P. Shonkoff, M.S., Center on the Developing Child. Presentation 1/18/07

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Relationships with Caregiver


Brain

development requires healthy caregiving Stress associated with abuse and neglect impairs brain development

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A majority of children entering foster care are under the age of 6

As many as 90% experience serious or chronic health problems

These children experience developmental delays at 4 -5 times the rate of other children

These children may have fundamental and severe difficulties with friendships, school, independence, and self esteem.

Adverse childhood experiences (ACE) linked to emotional, behavioral, and health problems in adults.

Best Practices for Children under 6


If The key to healthy and social and emotional development is positive and consistent early experiences with loving caregivers And early brain development is supported by caregiving by trusted adults who can play with, talk to, and comfort a child. Then How do we assure that the children we work with have these supports, connections, and attachments. What are best practices for the children we work with?

Best Practices for Children under 6


If Young children are more likely to have physical health problems than other children and many enter foster care with complex physical health needs Then How do we assure the children we work with have their medical needs met? What are best practices for the children we work with?

Best Practices for Children under 6


If If a young child is not adequately supported at the time separation, then a separation can be traumatic for a child. To reduce the impact of separation on a young child, the child needs to maintain healthy contact with caregivers. Then How do we assure the young children who have been separated from caregivers maintain healthy family contact with those caregivers? What are best practices for the children we work with?

Best Practices for Children under 6


If If a young child is not adequately supported at the time separation, then a separation can be traumatic for a child. To reduce the impact of separation on a young child, the child needs to maintain healthy contact with caregivers. Then How do we assure the young children who have been separated from caregivers maintain healthy family contact with caregivers? What are best practices for the children we work with?

CAPTA/IDEA Part C
CAPTA (Child Abuse Prevention Treatment Act)

requires infants and toddlers be evaluated for eligibility for early intervention services
Alaska Early Intervention/ Infant Learning

Program (ILP)

What is the Alaska Early Intervention/ Infant Learning Program (ILP)?

They help you understand a child's development They help you find services you need

for a child

Referring to Infant Learning Programs/ Federal and State Guidelines


We are obligated by law to refer

to ILP whenever a child under three has been abused or neglected Within 30 days of substantiated allegation of maltreatment but should happen as soon as possible Other? In the above referral situations, parental consent is encouraged but not required.

Infant Learning Program Screening and Evaluation


Any infant or toddler with a diagnosed or

suspected development delay needs a screening and or evaluation to determine eligibility to be enrolled in a program. Screening - is a quick look at how a child s learning and growing. Evaluation - included developmental tests and evaluation by qualified professionals to determine a child's initial and continuing eligibility.

Who is eligible for early intervention ILP services


Any child under the age of three years when: They show at least a 15% delay in one or more of these developmental areas:

Moving (gross motor) Using Hands (fine motor) Thinking/Learning (cognitive) Understanding/Talking (communication/language) Getting along with others (social/emotional) Doing things for him/her self (adaptive)

OR Have a diagnosed condition that may lead to a significant delay or Are at risk for a developmental delay.

Referring Children in Foster Care


Children should

be referred to ILP screening as soon as possible after deemed necessary If the child is not in custody, the parents should stay involved in the screening Both parents and foster parents should be involved in an evaluation or recommended services.

Making a referral
http://www.hss.state.a

k.us/ocs/InfantLearnin g/program/program_di r.htm Handout Referral Form Handout Brochure

Services for children might include:

Developmental screening and evaluation An Individualized Family Services Plan (IFSP) to outline goals and services families want for their children Information for families to better understand their child's developmental strengths and needs Home visits to help the family or caregivers guide their children in learning new skills Physical, occupation or speech therapy to help families support their child with daily activities Specialized equipment and resources to promote development Assistance in getting other specialized services and care families need

ILP/ Protective Factors


Parental Resilience Social Connections Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development Concrete Support in Times of Need

Social and Emotional Development


Nurturing and Attachment

Case Study
1. 2. 3.

4.
5.

6.
7.

How was it determined that child under three eligible for referral? When was referral accomplished? How were the parents included in the referral? How were the parents (foster parents) included in the screening? If needed, how were the parents (foster parents) included in the evaluation and services? How were the services included in the case plan? How were the protective factors in the family supported?

What happens after age three in ILP?


ILP hosts a meeting where

transition plan is developed Services for children who continue to experience developmental delays beyond the age of three are identified and established.

Referring children after age three?


Continue to refer

children

Engage parents
Head Start and other agencies that can continue

to work with children in the home and outside the school setting. Strengthening Families Strategies (child care).

Head Start
What

is Head Start? Services for 3-5 year olds Early Head Start Benefits for Children Benefits for Parents

Head Start/ Protective Factors


Parental Resilience Social Connections Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development Concrete Support in Times of Need

Social and Emotional Development


Nurturing and Attachment

STRENGTHENING FAMILIES AND CHILD WELFARE SYSTEM LINKAGES: POLICY AND PROGRAM STRATEGIES
Case Planning In-Home Child Protective Services Out-of-Home Care/ Permanency Older Youth Exiting Foster Care

ing Families Out of he CW System Intake and Investigations

Strengthening Families in Your Community!

Resources
Strengthening

Families

www.strengtheningfamilies.net
Center

for the Study of Social Policy


Families Alaska

www.cssp.org
Strengthening

www.strengtheningfamilies.alaska.gov Facebook too!


Alaska

Child Welfare Academy


too!
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http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/childwelfareacademy/ Facebook

THANK YOU!

When families do better- kids do better. Families dont care about how much you know until they know how much you care. Marian Wright Edelman
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