STUDENT SUPPORT AND DEVELOPMENT SERVICE

Student Learning Centre

Effective Reading and Note Making
Maria Graal

www.le.ac.uk/slc

Session Outline

• Introduction: reading and note making challenges • Reading goals and reading style • Non-linear note making • Speed reading techniques

Session Objectives
By the end of this workshop, I hope you will be able to: • use reading goals to select information; • use a range of reading styles; • understand the merits of linear vs non-linear note making • be aware of techniques to increase your reading speed

Reading and note making challenges

In groups, brainstorm and list the challenges associated with reading and note making (e.g. poor concentration)

Set reading goals
Reading goals give your reading a clear direction – reading goals include… • a series of questions • facts/information on a specific topic • evidence to endorse or contradict an argument

Analyse the question
SUBJECT, INSTRUCTION(S), KEY ASPECT(S), OTHER SIGNIFICANT WORDS, ASK QUESTIONS

Evaluate the impact of ‘Victorian values’ on the development of social work.
• • • • What are ‘Victorian values’? How have they influenced the development of social work? What other influences are there? Is there a range of opinions on how influential ‘Victorian values’ were?

Reading Styles

Use scanning for • introduction or preface • first or last paragraph of chapters • concluding or summarising chapter • book index

Use skimming for • previewing a selection of text prior to detailed reading • refreshing your understanding of the text following detailed reading

Only use detailed reading…

Making notes whenever you read
Use a note making technique whenever you read: • making selective detailed notes based on reading goals (such as an essay title) • underlining and highlighting • recording questions • pausing and summarising • recordings headings and keywords • making a thought map

PQRS Method
• PREVIEW: initial reading to gain a general idea of content; • QUESTION: formulate questions to identify the information you want to extract; • READ: read the material actively seeking answers; • SUMMARISE: summarise what you have read.

Linear vs non-linear

Thought mapping can be applied to a variety of study tasks including, planning, note taking, organising and exams. Plans for dissertations, reports, presentations, projects and essays can be made with a thought map. It can be applied to note taking tasks in lectures, seminars and with texts, as well as with note making tasks such as brainstorming ideas, making initial plans for work or recording your own thoughts and ideas. When tackling exams this technique can be made use of in revision for condensing, reviewing and recalling material. It provides a quick way of practising exams answers, allowing you to rehearse ideas, try out plans and test your recall. Finally, thought mapping can help with organisation skills, enabling you to overview your thoughts, manage your time and order everyday tasks.

Thought mapping can be applied to a variety of study tasks including, planning, note taking, organising and exams. Plans for dissertations, reports, presentations, projects and essays can be made with a thought map. It can be applied to note taking tasks in lectures, seminars and with texts, as well as with note making tasks such as brainstorming ideas, making initial plans for work or recording your own thoughts and ideas. When tackling exams this technique can be made use of in revision for condensing, reviewing and recalling material. It provides a quick way of practising exams answers, allowing you to rehearse ideas, try out plans and test your recall. Finally, thought mapping can help with organisation skills, enabling you to overview your thoughts, manage your time and order everyday tasks.

Thought mapping can be applied to a variety of study tasks including, planning, note taking, organising and exams. Plans for dissertations, reports, presentations, projects and essays can be made with a thought map. It can be applied to note taking tasks in lectures, seminars and with texts, as well as with note making tasks such as brainstorming ideas, making initial plans for work or recording your own thoughts and ideas. When tackling exams this technique can be made use of in revision for condensing, reviewing and recalling material. It provides a quick way of practising exams answers, allowing you to rehearse ideas, try out plans and test your recall. Finally, thought mapping can help with organisation skills, enabling you to overview your thoughts, manage your time and order everyday tasks.

Thought mapping can be applied to a variety of study tasks including, planning, note taking, organising and exams. Plans for dissertations, reports, presentations, projects and essays can be made with a thought map. It can be applied to note taking tasks in lectures, seminars and with texts, as well as with note making tasks such as brainstorming ideas, making initial plans for work or recording your own thoughts and ideas. When tackling exams this technique can be made use of in revision for condensing, reviewing and recalling material. It provides a quick way of practising exams answers, allowing you to rehearse ideas, try out plans and test your recall. Finally, thought mapping can help with organisation skills, enabling you to overview your thoughts, manage your time and order everyday tasks.

Thought mapping can be applied to a variety of study tasks including, planning, note taking, organising and exams. Plans for dissertations, reports, presentations, projects and essays can be made with a thought map. It can be applied to note taking tasks in lectures, seminars and with texts, as well as with note making tasks such as brainstorming ideas, making initial plans for work or recording your own thoughts and ideas. When tackling exams this technique can be made use of in revision for condensing, reviewing and recalling material. It provides a quick way of practising exams answers, allowing you to rehearse ideas, try out plans and test your recall. Finally, thought mapping can help with organisation skills, enabling you to overview your thoughts, manage your time and order everyday tasks.

Thought mapping can be applied to a variety of study tasks including, planning, note taking, organising and exams. Plans for dissertations, reports, presentations, projects and essays can be made with a thought map. It can be applied to note taking tasks in lectures, seminars and with texts, as well as with note making tasks such as brainstorming ideas, making initial plans for work or recording your own thoughts and ideas. When tackling exams this technique can be made use of in revision for condensing, reviewing and recalling material. It provides a quick way of practising exams answers, allowing you to rehearse ideas, try out plans and test your recall. Finally, thought mapping can help with organisation skills, enabling you to overview your thoughts, manage your time and order everyday tasks.

Thought mapping can be applied to a variety of study tasks including, planning, note taking, organising and exams. Plans for dissertations, reports, presentations, projects and essays can be made with a thought map. It can be applied to note taking tasks in lectures, seminars and with texts, as well as with note making tasks such as brainstorming ideas, making initial plans for work or recording your own thoughts and ideas. When tackling exams this technique can be made use of in revision for condensing, reviewing and recalling material. It provides a quick way of practising exams answers, allowing you to rehearse ideas, try out plans and test your recall. Finally, thought mapping can help with organisation skills, enabling you to overview your thoughts, manage your time and order everyday tasks.

Thought mapping can be applied to a variety of study tasks including, planning, note taking, organising and exams. Plans for dissertations, reports, presentations, projects and essays can be made with a thought map. It can be applied to note taking tasks in lectures, seminars and with texts, as well as with note making tasks such as brainstorming ideas, making initial plans for work or recording your own thoughts and ideas. When tackling exams this technique can be made use of in revision for condensing, reviewing and recalling material. It provides a quick way of practising exams answers, allowing you to rehearse ideas, try out plans and test your recall. Finally, thought mapping can help with organisation skills, enabling you to overview your thoughts, manage your time and order everyday tasks.

Using non-linear notes can:
• help you gather and hold large amounts of information on one page; • enable you to create an overview of a large topic or subject area; • help you to see links and connections in your notes; • provide a powerful aid to memory using the association of word, image, number, colour and spatial awareness.

We naturally take short-cuts when we read

Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at an Elingsh uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the fisrt and lsat ltteer is in the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae we do not raed ervey lteter by it slef but the wrod as a wlohe.

eye movements

fixation (¼ - 1½ seconds)

words

visual wandering eye movements back skipping

words

To reduce back skipping: use a guide

Thought mapping can be applied to a variety of study tasks including, planning, note taking, organising and exams. Plans for dissertations, reports, presentations, projects and essays can be made with a thought map.

fixation eye movements

fixation

fixation

words

Improving your reading skills will reduce unnecessary reading time and enable you to read in a more focused and selective manner. You will also be able to increase levels of understanding and concentration. This leaflet shows you how to read with greater efficiency by using a range of different reading skills.

Summary
• Have a clear focus for your reading. Set your reading goals. • Survey the text before you spend the time and effort involved in detailed reading. • Scan and skim to select the text for detailed reading. • Use a form of note taking whenever you read, to keep you concentrating, aid understanding and provide you with a record of your reading. • To improve your reading speed, don't increase the speed of the eye across the page, but increase the number of words the eye recognises in a single fixation. • See www.le.ac.uk/slc for more information

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