PARTNERS IN LEARNING

School of the Future Overview

Rules of Engagement
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Philadelphia Context
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Grade 9 – 12 Public High School with 750 Students opened Sept. 2006 Neighborhood High School with comprehensive curriculum, not special admit 3 Year project funded by the School District of Philadelphia with a standard budget allocation Microsoft’s contribution primarily human capital, partnership development support and MCS resourcing and is part of our US Partners in Learning portfolio New construction in West Philadelphia (163K Sq. Ft.) Best practices and outcomes to be leveraged worldwide. Building not required.  Resources available at www.microsoft.com/education/sof

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Project Principles
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6 Essential Questions
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Whiteboards
Wireless

PDAs
Laptops

Carts
Labs

Real-time Assessment

Technology OneNote email is not the T1 Distributed issue T3 Media
Robotics

Distance Learning

Portals
Instructional Management Solutions WWW2

Smartcards

Wireless Projectors

Virtual Classrooms

Flexible Space

Tablets IM

Windows Server 2003

Speech Recognition

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What are you trying to create?
Establishing the Environment Principles
1 where learning is not dependent on time and place 2 where content, curriculum and tools are current and relevant 3 where instruction adapts to the needs of the individual student

continuous relevant adaptive

Implications
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continuous

Schedule, Calendar, Contracts, Information Access

r el e v a n t

relevant

Professional Development, Instruction, Tools, Systems, Partnerships

Tools, Assessment Models, Space, Customer Awareness
adaptive

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Who are we creating this for?
1 in 6 of the world’s adults is illiterate 60,000 of UK pupils have unauthorized absence from school every day Currently, some 115 million children in the world are not being educated Today’s average US student has 4 – 5 email addresses 26% of US students access a foreign news service The fastest growing segment of computer users today in the US is 5 – 7 year olds. In Indonesia, a person with tertiary education earns an average 82 per cent more than one with secondary qualifications. In Paraguay, the difference is as high as 300 percent. 96% of US students say school is important to their success… only 20% believe it is meeting their needs.

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Who is your customer?
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MOTIVE

• Motivations • Obstacles • Trends • Interests • Values • Environment

How will you organize your work?
Through Definition of scope.
Areas of Innovation
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What process will guide your efforts? Development Process 6
i
©

1
Introspection
Establish Pedagogy Methodology Culture Success Metrics Benchmarks

2 Investigation
Review and Identify Best Practice Innovation Research Advisory Board SWOT Process

3 Inclusion
Engage Community Key Leaders Government Partners

4 Innovation
Determine Personnel Building IT Architecture

5 Implementation
Act Training Readiness Launch

6 Introspection
Reflect, Review and Adjust

stage 1

stage 2

stage 3

stage 4

stage 5

stage 6

1 – 3 months

4 - 6 months

30 – 36+ months

2 - 6 months

1 - 4 months

4 - 12 months

What is Critical for Success?
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Creating Common Language
14 Success Factor 1: Involved and connected learning community An involved and connected learning community acknowledges that all stakeholders— students, parents, community organizations, Higher Ed, businesses, etc. must participate if success is to be realized. The learning community is a dynamic, vibrant society that incorporates and represents the voices of all constituents. Multiple means for communicating, sharing information, and soliciting input must be established. Digital tools, electronic and print media must support inclusion, eliminating barriers of language and economics. Finally, the learning community must provide opportunities that promote learning as a life-long process.

Success Factor 2: Proficient and inviting curriculum-driven setting

The physical setting must support and be conducive to the continuous and changing needs of the learning community. The technical infrastructure must support current and future mobile and fixed technical equipment and should enable the sharing of all data types. All learning spaces must provide the necessary elements that allow for instruction and learning at all times and be mobile and flexible to adapt to changes in teaching and learning activities.

Success Factor: Proficient and inviting curriculum–driven setting
The physical setting must support and be conducive to the continuous and changing needs of the learning community. The technical infrastructure must support current and future mobile and fixed technical equipment and should enable the sharing of all data types. All learning spaces must provide the necessary elements that allow for instruction and learning at all times and be mobile and flexible to adapt to changes in teaching and learning activities. The physical setting must also act as a motivating element for members of the learning community and support the mission and vision of the school.

STRENGTHS
• Wireless infrastructure • 1:1 access • Glass-enriched, flexible and moveable learning spaces • Prepares students for the technology rich workplace and society they will live and work in • Provides a model for school design and construction

WEAKNESSES
• Teachers need to rethink the way they design and deliver content • Teachers must learn to mentor and engage students and community members in teaching and learning process. • Difficult to plan for future needs of physical space

OPPORTUNITIES
• Have real observable societal impact • Prepare learners who are able to adapt to changing, technology rich society and workplace • Prepare all learners for jobs yet to be identified • Drive architectural design • Develop integrated spaces for collaboration and team projects • Ability to extend beyond school day to meet the needs of the community • Motivate all members of the community to learn, grow and be involved

THREATS
• Maintaining currency of infrastructure and technology tools • Not maximizing use of facility to achieve cost effectiveness • Administrators and staff have not been selected

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Building the Assets
Design Principles
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What assets will you need?
Success Factor Asset Competency Wheel Professional Leadership Development Model Learning Space Matrix R&D Integration Framework Device Strategy Community Inclusion Plan School Procurement System Time Reporting and Payroll Management

Professional Leadership Proficient and inviting curriculum-driven setting Cross-Curricula Integration of R&D

Involved and Connected Learning Community

Home/School Broadband Connection Community Information Portal and Content Repository Space and Time Management Solution InfoPath Form Development Virtual Library / Virtual Teaching Assistant Food Service Management Control

Flexible and sustainable learning environment

Assessment Dashboard

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Asset: Learning

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Learning Plan Functions
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Learning Plan Form 24/7
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Day in a Life
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9:15 Community Gathering 9:45 – 4:30 Formal Learning Time
Essential Questions for Each PSSA Strand Determined  Duration of Question Cycle Dependent on Question  Student Placement Determined by LP (Learning Plan)

4:30 – 10:00 Continuous Engagement Opportunities
Onsite, Offsite or Online  Options for all 3 Functions Offered

Personal

Asset Examples

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Successful Learning Organization

Copyright © 1992, 1996, 2001-2003 by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. This work is derived from the LEADERSHIP ARCHITECT® Competency Library developed and copyrighted by Robert W. Eichinger and Michael M. Lombardo for Lominger Limited, Inc.

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Building and Space Design Principles
6 Characteristics of Effective Learning Spaces  Motivating  Flexible  Collaborative  Reflective  Performance Focused  Community Centric

Learning Space Matrix

Building Location
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Objective:
To be environmentally responsible to surrounding area including the park and the adjacent community

Motivating Maximizes natural lighting throughout the building

Flexible First floor designed to accommodate elements of an urban community center with a high degree of interaction among staff and students

Collaborative Part of the Centennial District; enhances surrounding neighborhood and adjacent parkland Fairmount Park and nearby Philadelphia Zoo become curricular tools for out-of-classroom ecological and environmental studies

Reflective Sited and designed to reflect the tranquility of the natural setting; innovative, yet sited to take advantage of the park’s natural beauty and its ability to stimulate personal reflection

Performance Focused Appropriate vegetation and landscaping elements including a “green roof” will align with the SOF prescribed ecological and environmental studies Adjacent to four athletic fields

Community Centric First floor and lower elevation provide residents with easy access to appropriate resources

Interactive Learning Center

Streetscape and Lobby

Performance Arts Pavilion

Building Infrastructure

Physical Fitness Suite

Entrance

School of the Future
www.microsoft.com/education/sof

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