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ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFIENCY (WAJ 3102) LECTURE NAME : MISS HAJAH YONG ROFIDAH

BY : SITI KHADIJAH BINTI ALIAS NUR ANIS BINTI ZAKARIA PISMP SEM 1

WHAT IS ADVERBS ?
An adverbs modifies or tell us more about a verb, an adjective or

another adverb.

PLACE

NEGATION OR AFFIRMATION

TIME

TYPE OF ADVERB
INTERROGATION MANNER

FREQUENCY

DEGREE

ADVERBS OF PLACE
USAGE : Tell us where someone or something is or where an action occurs.
EXAMPLE :

Your bag is over there. Lets go somewhere spesial tonight Have you seen my spectacles anywhere?

ADVERBS OF TIME
USAGE : Tell us when an action is carried out.
EXAMPLE :

Well see you later. Its going to rain soon. The babys asleep now.

ADVERBS OF MANNER
USAGE : Tell us how an action is carried out.
EXAMPLE :

The children are playing happily. The old women climbed slowly up the stairs We must never speak rudely to anyone.

ADVERBS OF DEGREE
USAGE : Tell us the extent or degree of an action.
EXAMPLE :

This book is so boring! I am extremly tired. Your dress is too short.

ADVERBS OF FREQUENCY
USAGE : Tell us how often an action occurs.
EXAMPLE :

My grandmother seldom goes out. I have never seen snow. I often goes swimming.

ADVERBS OF INTERROGATION
USAGE : Ask question about an action.
EXAMPLE :

Why is everyone so sad? When will Helina return from London? Where is Brian now?

ADVERBS OF NEGATION OR AFFIRMATION


USAGE :
Tell us whether or not an action will occur. EXAMPLE :

We will certainly help you. Jim will definitely do well in his exam. I will never speak to ypou again!

POSITION OF ADVERBS
STAGE 1 : Initial-position ( at the beginning of sentence)
EXAMPLE : immediately, the girls started screaming. STAGE 2 : Mid-position ( in the middle of sentence,

before the verb)

EXAMPLE : Shiela always wake up early.

STAGE

3 : End-position ( at the end of a sentence) EXAMPLE : The children sang happily.

COMPARATIVE ADVERBS
The comparative form of an adverb is used when you compare a person or thing with one other person or thing.
He finished sooner than she did.

If the adverb has one syllable, add an er to make it comparative.


slow = slower soon = sooner

If the adverb has two or more syllables, add more to the beginning to make it comparative.
calmly = more calmly briskly = more briskly

SUPERLATIVE ADVERBS
The superlative form of an adverb is used when you are comparing a person or thing with more than one other person or thing.
He is the quickest of the three boys.

If the adverb has one syllable, add an est to make it superlative.


slow = slowest soon = soonest

If the adverb has two or more syllables, add most to the beginning to make it superlative.
Calmly = most calmly Briskly = most briskly

Use only one sign of comparison at a time. Do NOT use more and er together or most and est together.
Incorrect: That beach has the most whitest sand. Correct: That beach has the whitest sand.

The comparative and superlative forms of some adjectives and adverbs are completely different words:
good, better, best bad, worse, worst well, better, best much, more, most little, less, least