You are on page 1of 34

High School Library History

8th Century: Canterbury, York, Winchester and Hexham England had


first documented school libraries

12th Century: At St. Paul’s Cathederal School in London books were


turned over to the Schoolmaster and ex officio librarian in a formal
service. Penalty for failing to return a book to St. Paul’s London was
specified as excommunication.

1328 or 1329: Books for instruction were bequeathed to the school at


St. Paul’s Cathedral. A larger collection was bequeathed in 1358.

1573: Books were left to the Lybrarie at the Royal Grammar School
at Guildford
High School Library History

The King’s School library, now the Annex to the Dayton (OH) public
Chapter House from Thomas library built in 1924 as the high
Bonnor’s Itinerary of 1796 The school library.
King’s School Glouster, UK http://home.dayton.lib.oh.us/Archives
http://www.thekingsschool.co.uk/dept/his/history_of_school/
High School Library History

1835: New York State passed a low providing that “the school district
library should be supported by taxation.”

1865: Average school library book collection in France 60 volumes

Late 1800s: public libraries in New England began collaborating with


schools to supply books and other learning materials.

1889: Average school library collection in France 150 volumes

1892: New York State passed legislation for the development of school
libraries.

3
High School Library History

1906: the first school library in Virginia opened.

1914: ALA created the School Library section

1928: The High School Library; Its Function in Education by Hannah Logasa
was published.

1958: The National Defense Education Act allowed federal funding for
school libraries. 50% of U.S. schools had library media centers

1985: 93% of U.S. schools had library media centers


High School Library History

B.M.C. Durfee High School library, Students studying in the Wichita (KS)
Fall River MA High School North library
circa 1890 circa 1930
Uncredited Photo by Edgar B. Smith
http://www.sailsinc.org/Durfee/cdp www.wichitaphotos.org
ictures/durfeeinterior3.jpg
High School Library History

http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2005/2005324.pdf
Designing a New Circulation
Desk
For Today’s High School Library
What are needs of the
students?
…the Library Teacher?
…the Library Staff (Assistants, Aids)?

7
A high school library
circulation desk
is often also a
reference desk.
The many tasks
and needs are
detailed in the
following
slides.

8
First consideration:
Needs of the students

9
What did students need in the
past? What do students need
today?

Technology has changed—what


services are needed? 10
Accessibility for Students

• Students in • All students need


wheelchairs a Circulation Desk
need that is easy to use
accessible “lip” for book checkout.
that hangs out
from the • Counter height
Circulation 29”
Desk.

11
Book checkout needs: Flat
counter for accessibility.

12
Book Cart Located by Entrance
Staff Usability:
Pull out cart

Students need
Easy-to-find book drop.

13
Students can be motivated by
interesting book displays.

*Holiday Books
*Featured Authors
14
Students need access to reference
help

Dictiona
ry
Globe

15
. Students benefit from
*counters with no barriers
*guidance for information
needs
*friendly staff

16
Classic Circ/Ref desk

17
Needs of the library
teacher or librarian.

18
II. Library Teacher Needs
• Helping students
• Cataloging
• Ordering/Purchasing
• Lesson Planning:
– Scheduling the Library
– Collaborating with teachers
• Grades/Financial Budgets

19
Helping Students
• Make ref-desk
interesting!
Display interactive
plant or …?
• Ready Reference
Materials on hand
• Computer for library
catalog and online
help

20
Cataloging
• Cataloging Floor Space for
Reference Books 2 Single sided Book Trucks
-Books to be cataloged
– Sears Subject -Cataloged books
Heading
– Dewey Decimal
Reference
– Lib. of Congress
Reference

21
Ordering/Purchasing
• Shelving for
Book Vendors

• File drawers for


Financial files,
budgets &
information on
grants
Fax Machine

22
Lesson Planning

• Scheduling the Library


• & Collaborating with teachers
• Helping teachers to help students learn

23
Grades & Attendance Files for
student programs.

Student Aids

Book Clubs
24
Drawers that open for
sideways file storage. Files
names are visible from the
desk chair.

25
Needs of the library staff.

26
Staff Assistants need to be near the
book theft system. They need
methods to organize cords and
multiple electrical outlets for AV
testing.

27
Circulation Counter

Space for
–Computer
–Barcode
scanner
–Slip printer
–Circulation
Items:
28
Space for 3-4 Computers
• Computers
needed for
– circulation,
– other assistants
or volunteers,
– student aids.

29
Needs for doors & drawers
• Gates in and out Pullout drawers
of circulation. for small items:
(Swing out.) bookmarks, etc.

30
Space on Counters & Below
• Newspaper
preparation takes
space

• Area for printers

31
Raised counter to store
items

Floor space
For
Book Trucks

32
Storage
• New Media
storage, i.e.
“play- aways,”
CD’s, new A.V.
media
processing
materials

33
High School Library History
bibliography

Clyde, L.A. (1999). The schole lybrarie: Images from our past. School Libraries Worldwide, 5 (1), 1-16 . Retrieved March 9,
2008, from Wilson Web database.

Internet School Library Media Center. School Libraries -- History. Retrieved March 2, 2008, from
http://falcon.jmu.edu/~ramseyil/index.html

Mitchie, J. S. & Holton, B. A. (2005) Fifty Years of Supporting Children’s Learning: A History of Public School Libraries and
Federal Legislation from 1953–2000. (NCES 2005-311) \U.S. Department of Education. National Center for Education Statistics.
Washington DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Retrieved March 5, 2008, from
http://nces.ed.gov/programs/quarterly/vol_7/1_2/7_2.asp

Michie, J. S. & Holton, B. A. (2005) America's Public School Libraries: 1953-2000. (NCES 2005-324). U.S. Department of
Education, National center for Education Statistics. Washington, DC; U.S. Government Printing Office. Retrieved March 2, 2008,
from nces.ed.gov/pubs2005/2005324.pdf