Remix as an Educational Activity

Christopher Shamburg
Teachers College, Columbia University
July 7, 2014
Remix and Mashups
Remix means…to take
cultural artifacts and
manipulate them into new
kinds of creative blends
(Lankshear and Knobel,
2008).


Mashups the combination of
two or more traditionally
unrelated subjects
(Bertolone, 2009).
Some Examples of Contemporary Remix and Mashup
Practices
http://www.archive.org/details/DjDang
erMouse-TheGreyAlbum
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UtE
H6wZXPA4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=dnhKPw2NXIw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2T5_0
AGdFic
http://youtu.be/q2p
eQUS6oLY
Music

Food
Martial Arts
Remix as a Lens for Culture

Thomas
on Remixes, Globalization
and Education
If schools can actually produce people who
are good synthesizers, they’re going to be
more effective and innovative workers...

Kids get mashups. They do it naturally. And
today, he who mashes best will remix most
and be wealthiest…

--Thomas Friedman
From School Administrator Feb, 2008
“You”


Oxford English Dictionary
You:

A. pron. The objective case of the second person plural pronoun ye pron., representing the Old English
accusative and dative.

I. Used to address two or more persons, animals, or personified things.
* As object.

1.
a. As direct object of a verb (originally accusative).
b. As indirect object (originally dative); ‘to you’.
c. As the object of a preposition.

2. refl. As direct object: yourselves (arch. in later use). As indirect object: ‘to or for yourselves’ (now
colloq. (chiefly U.S. regional)).

** As object or subject.
3. Defined or made precise by a qualifying word or phrase. Cf. we pron. 1c, us pron.

*** As subject, replacing ye pron.
4.
a. As subject.
b. As vocative, chiefly in apposition to a following noun or noun phrase.
I. Used to address a single person, animal, or personified thing, originally as a mark of respect,
deference, or formality but later in general use (see the etymological note at thou pron. and n.1).
* As object, replacing thee pron.

You, cont. Oxford English Dictionary

5.
a. As indirect object; ‘to you’.
b. As the object of a preposition.
c. As direct object of a verb.
d. As dative of interest; ‘for you’.


†e. Used expletively (the so-called ‘ethic dative’). Cf. me pron.1 2d, ye pron. 4c. Obs.

6. refl. As direct object: yourself (arch. in later use). As indirect object: ‘to or for yourself’ (now colloq. (chiefly U.S. regional)).
** As subject, replacing thou n.2

7.
a. As subject.
b. As vocative, chiefly in apposition to a following noun or noun phrase. Also in contexts expressing reproach of or contempt for the
person addressed often emphasized by being placed or repeated after the noun. Cf. thou pron. 2.

*** As subject or object.

8. Used to address any hearer or reader; (hence as an indefinite personal pronoun) any person, one (one pron. 17a).

9. Premodified by an adjective, as poor, lucky, etc.
1. As possessive adjective: = your adj. Now regional (chiefly Caribbean).
In some instances, esp. in early quots., perh. an error for your.

2. In predicative use: suited to or representative of your tastes, personality, etc.; appropriate for you. Cf. me adj.

1. (An instance of) the word you.

2. The person being addressed; the personality, or an aspect of the personality, of the one addressed.
“You”
“You”
scared
“You”
happy
“You”
angry
“You”
He stole your spouse away
“You”
Your long lost love, finally.
“You”
Your friend who won the lottery
Context
con·text noun \ˈkän-ˌtekst\

the situation in which something happens :
the group of conditions that exist where
and when something happens.

Meriam-Webster Dictionary
“A new species would bless me as
its creator and source.”
“A new species would bless me as
its creator and source.”
humbled
“A new species would bless me as
its creator and source.”
arrogant
“Nothing in human shape could
have destroyed the fair child.”
“Nothing in human shape could
have destroyed the fair child.”
distraught
“Nothing in human shape could
have destroyed the fair child.”
vengeful

“No one can conceive the
variety of feelings which
bore me onwards, like a
hurricane.”
Choral Performance: Victor, Before and
After
Audio: Workshop of Filthy Creation
“I collected bones from charnel-
houses and disturbed, with profane
fingers, the tremendous secrets of
the human frame. In a solitary
chamber, or rather cell, at the top of
the house, and separated from all
the other apartments by a gallery
and staircase, I kept my workshop of
filthy creation.”
Other Foley Techniques
• Marching army: boots on hard surface
(repeated, echo, looped)
• Shovels: spoons in cups of sand or
pebbles (change the pitch or speed)
• Airplane engine: fan starting and running
• Helicopter: opening and closing an
umbrella very fast
• Bones breaking: cracking celery or
carrots
• Walking in snow: patting corn starch
• Large person or animal eating: chewing
watermelon or apple
• Boiling water: blowing bubbles in water
with straw
• Plucking/ripping hair: tearing a piece of
paper


http://podcourse.blogspot.com/2012/06/teaching-with-foley.html
Representational and Abstract Art
Representational:
Art that attempts to
represent external
reality

Abstract:
Art that does not imitate
or directly represent
external reality but
deeper themes and
ideas
Abstract Audio
http://youtu.be/5aHfO1zaahE
http://youtu.be/DQ6q9BYJBmg
Workshop of Filthy Creation: Abstract

• Think of a theme, key
words or ideas
• Selected lines or phrases
• Choose something non-
fiction
• Choose something
fictional
• Mix in an an interesting
way

Abstract
project
Anatomy of a Remix
Quotes from Frankenstein

Walking Dead Theme

ABC News Broadcast

Twilight Zone “Nick of Time”
Fair Use Factors
Quotes from Frankenstein

Walking Dead Theme

ABC News Broadcast

Twilight Zone

1. The purpose and character of the
use, including whether such use is
of commercial nature or is for
nonprofit educational purposes.

1. The nature of the copyrighted
work.

2. The amount and substantiality of
the portion used in relation to the
copyrighted work as a whole.

1. The effect of the use upon the
potential market for, or value of,
the copyrighted work.
Caveats of Remix
Copyright
(legal)

Copyright begins at the
moment an idea is in a
fixed form.

It has a time limit.

It includes copies,
performances, and
derivative works.

Use ‘fair use’ and
transformation.







Plagiarism
(ethical)

Taking credit for
someone else’s ideas is
not necessarily illegal.



Offensive
(cultural)

New meanings are
created when you mix
religious music, folk
art, or sacred images.

Satire and parody are
fine, but be aware
that you’re doing it.


Some Video Applications, Applying
“Fair Use”
Remixing Text: Fanfiction


Some Genres of Fiction:
When the Lit Hits the Fan
Prequels
Sequels
Missing Scenes
Alternate Perspectives
Cross Overs
Alternate Universes
Mary Sues
Drabbles

Remixing Poetry
London by William Blake

I wander thro' each charter'd street,
Near where the charter'd Thames does flow,
And mark in every face I meet
Marks of weakness, marks of woe.

In every cry of every Man,
In every Infant's cry of fear,
In every voice, in every ban,
The mind-forg'd manacles I hear.

How the Chimney-sweeper's cry
Every black'ning Church appalls;
And the hapless Soldier's sigh
Runs in blood down Palace walls.

But most thro' midnight streets I hear
How the youthful Harlot's curse
Blasts the new born Infant's tear,
And blights with plagues the Marriage hearse.
Remix Guidelines

• Remix London with another song or poem.

• It should be interesting.

• Original work should be 12-14 lines, roughly
half of each work.

London by William Blake

I wander thro' each charter'd street,
Near where the charter'd Thames does flow,
And mark in every face I meet
Marks of weakness, marks of woe.

In every cry of every Man,
In every Infant's cry of fear,
In every voice, in every ban,
The mind-forg'd manacles I hear.

How the Chimney-sweeper's cry
Every black'ning Church appalls;
And the hapless Soldier's sigh
Runs in blood down Palace walls.

But most thro' midnight streets I hear
How the youthful Harlot's curse
Blasts the new born Infant's tear,
And blights with plagues the Marriage hearse.
I Walk Alone by Green Day


I walk a lonely road
The only one that I have ever known
Don't know where it goes
But it's home to me and I walk alone
I walk this empty street

On the Boulevard of Broken Dreams
When the city sleeps
And I'm the only one and I walk alone

I walk alone
I walk alone
I walk alone

My shadow's the only one that walks beside me
My shallow heart's the only thing that's beating
Sometimes I wish someone out there will find me
'til then I walk alone
London's Boulevard of Broken Dreams


I walk a lonely road,
The only one that I have ever known,
And mark in every face I meet,
Marks of weakness, marks of woe.
In every cry of every man,
On the Boulevard of Broken Dreams,
In every voice, in every ban,
I walk this empty street.
But most, through midnight streets I hear
My shallow heart's the only thing that's beating,
Blasts the new-born infant's tear,
Sometimes I wish someone out there will find me.

http://is.gd/remixpoetry
Analog to Digital Applications:
Augmented Reality
Google Glass Aurasma
Aurasma

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful