VALUE CATEGORIZATION…

DEFINING VALUES..

“A value is a belief, a mission, or a philosophy that is meaningful. Whether we are consciously aware of them or not, every individual has a core set of personal values. Values can range from the commonplace, such as the belief in hard work and punctuality, to the more psychological, such as self-reliance, concern for others, and harmony of purpose.”

IMPORTANCE OF VALUES…
 “The

Importance of Values and Morals are the code we live by in a civil and just society. They are what we use to guide our interactions with others, with our friends and family, in our businesses and professional behaviour. Our values and morals are a reflection of our spirituality; our character. They are what we hope to model for our children and the children around us, because children do watch us as they develop their own sense of right and wrong.” person with proper values will not be afraid to face problems. He or she will expect and accept them as part of life. He or she will not give un necessary importance to anything that happens in life. He or she will have complete faith in God. Such a person will be an example to the rest. 

A

VALUE CATEGORIZATION:

DEFINING INDIVIDUAL VALUES….
 Values

are psychological objects. 

 Values,

Accomplishment, and our Psychological Energies.

 Values are

idealized conceptions that are endorsed by the personality

COMMON PERSONAL VALUES///
ccuracy

                   

Adventure All for one & one for all Beauty Calm, quietude, peace Challenge Change Cleanliness, orderliness Collaboration Commitment Communication Community Competence Competition Concern for others Satisfying others Security Self-givingness Cooperation Coordination Creativity
Safety

Friendship

CONTINUUM OF PSYCHOLOGICAL FORMS FROM DATA TO VALUES…
 Data are

mental facts derived from sense observation.  Information is data organized by the physical mind into meaningful relationships.  Thoughts are specific conclusions or observations drawn from the information..  Ideas are generalized conceptions derived from specific thoughts.  Opinions are thoughts which the mind endorses and the ego identifies as its own.  Beliefs are ideas which the mind endorses and the mental ego identifies with as true for its life.  Attitudes are opinions endorsed and energized by the vital ego.

ORIGIN OF VALUES - FROM LIFE AND FROM SPIRIT
 Society

acquires values through a long process of trial and error experimentation with various approaches to life. years and centuries, the collective comes to recognize that certain principles or guidelines are essential for the survival or vital for the growth of the individual and the community. They learn by experience to value these essential principles and pass them on to future generations as cultural guidelines for action.

 Over

FOR EXAMPLE..
They

discover that

 Cleanliness

is essential for heath.  Punctuality and regularity of action are essential for success in agriculture.  Honesty and truthfulness are essential in trade.  Loyalty and patriotism are essential for the integrity and defense of the community.  Responsibility, generosity and self-sacrifice are the bedrocks of the family.

UNIVERSAL VALUES     
 According

to Berlin, "...universal values....are values that a great many human beings in the vast majority of places and situations, at almost all times, do in fact hold in common, whether consciously and explicitly or as expressed in their behaviour. SEN  interprets the term in this way, pointing out that when Mahatma Gandhi argued that non-violence is a universal value, he was arguing that all people have reason to value non-violence, not that all people currently value non-violence

 AMARTYA

BELOW ARE EACH OF THE UNIVERSAL VALUES
 Power: authority leadership; dominance  Achievement: success; capability; ambition; influence; 

intelligence; self-respect  Hedonism: pleasure; enjoying life  Stimulation: daring activities; varied life; exciting life  Self-direction: creativity; freedom; independence;  curiosity; choosing your own goals.  Universalism: broadmindedness; wisdom; social justice;  equality; a world at peace; a world of beauty; unity with nature; protecting the environment; inner harmony.  Benevolence: helpfulness; honesty; forgiveness; loyalty;  responsibility; friendship  Tradition: accepting one's portion in life; humility; devoutness; respect for tradition; moderation  Conformity: self-discipline; obedience  Security: cleanliness; family security; national security; stability of social order; reciprocation of favours; health; sense of belonging

DHARMA AND UNIVERSAL VALUES OF HUMANISM

 Dharma

thus truly symbolises universal values of humanism and can form the basis of global ethics. is not a religion but "dharma" which means a way of life based on universal values of humanism.

 Hinduism

 Hinduism,as

a religions is polytheistic.

 Religions

such as Christianity and Islam are monotheistic .

CULTURAL VALUES….
 They

are commonly held standards of what is acceptable or unacceptable, important or unimportant ,right or wrong, workable or unworkable etc. in a community or society. are related to the norms of a culture, but they are more general and abstract than norms. Norms are rules for behavior in specific situations, while values identify what should be judged as good or evil.

 Values

CULTURAL VALUES
INDIAN VALUES

NON-INDIAN VALUES

Family

prestige a dependency on individual responsibility the nearest to the clan; a greater pressure exists in the nuclear clan than anything comparable in the dominant society; a relationship gives security and identity.  Spreading culture - By word of mouth  Peace - Harmony :Cosmic harmony is sought; individual is concerned personally with the entire cosmos.  Health - The body and soul are one; health is synonymous with the harmony of body and soul with nature.

- Secruity and prestige found within the confines of the nearest relatives and especially in the nuclear family.
Nuclear family

By writing books.  Personal peace - a personal harmony is sought within the individual person.  A scientific viewpoint is taken to the restoration of bodily health.

CONTD..
INDIAN VALUES
TIME - Natural time regulates their activities with a NOW orientation.  WILL POWER - Fatalism; man cannot alter events and he must constantly attempt to restore all things to their original harmony.  OWNERSHIP - Clan system dictates ownership, which is carried on through mother. (In some cases through father.)  PROPERTY - Communal - Using only what is needed and sharing with others.   SECURITY - Security is found within the family .WHO AM I?  WORK - Work when necessary  STRUCTURE OF SOCIETY - Noncompetitive; non-comparative .

NON-INDIAN VALUES
Clock time regulates with a FUTURE orientation.  Self-determination - The world can be altered by man's will. He tries to create God.  Legal ownership - passed by law.  Private property - Surplus is accumulated; goods belong to one person.  Security is found in success. WHAT HAVE I DONE?  Work for itself  Competitive - Basis for GET AHEAD

“CULTURAL VALUES AT WORK IN GLOBALIZING INDIA"
Power

Distance (PDI) (IDV)

Individualism/Collectivism Masculinity Uncertainty

(MAS) Avoidance (UAI)