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Grammar Unit

Conjunctions
Lets Review . . .
The conjunction is the seventh of the eight parts
of speech. Just for the record, here are all eight:

Noun
Pronoun
Adjective
Verb
Adverb
Preposition
Conjunction
Interjection
First, let's start with a basic
definition:
Conjunctions are words that join words
or groups of words.

There are two main types:
coordinating conjunctions
subordinating conjunctions
Coordinating conjunctions include:
And
Or
But
For
Nor

These conjunctions connect words, phrases, and
clauses of equal value.
Lets practice . . .
Write 3 sentences that include coordinating
conjunctions.

Do they connect words, phrases, and
clauses of equal value?
Independent Clauses:
Clauses of equal value are called independent clauses and
can stand on their own as separate sentences.

Example:
John is running in this race and I am carrying his water
bottle.

Each clause can stand alone:
John is running in this race.
I am carrying his water bottle.

Double check your sentences - conjunctions connect
words, phrases, and clauses of equal value.

Subordinating conjunctions:
Subordinating conjunctions introduce dependent
clauses.

Dependent clauses cannot stand alone as a single
sentence.

In fact, the clause is dependent on the rest of the
sentence for its meaning.
Dependent Clauses:
Dependent Clauses cannot stand alone as a single
sentence.
The clause is dependent on the rest of the sentence for its
meaning.



Example:
Since I will not be home, Tina will answer the phone.

"Since I will not be home" doesn't make sense by itself.
It is dependent on the rest of the sentence for its meaning.

Most commonly used subordinating conjunctions include:

Although
Because
As
While
Until
Whether
Since
After
So that
When
Before
If
Subordinating Conjunctions
Now lets practice . . .
Subordinating conjunctions introduce dependent
clauses.

With a partner, come up with at least 3 examples
of sentences that include Subordinating
Conjunctions that introduce Dependent Clauses.
Take a few minutes . . .
to prepare for the Conjunction Quiz.

Conjunction Quiz
Find the conjunctions in the following sentences.
Label them C for coordinating or S for subordinating.

1. He listened to the man's story and reported it to the policeman on duty.

2. I haven't seen my brother since he left for college.

3. Your aunt or your uncle will pick you up from school today.

4. Tom, Jane, Sue, and Tim will be going on the trip.

5. I remember the old school book, for it was once mine.

6. Sarah did not feel well, but she went to class anyway.

7. Although the old man was hungry, he never said a word to anyone.

8. I think I heard that on the television or radio, although I am not sure.
Conjunction Homework
In a newspaper or magazine, find an article that
interests you and is more than 10 sentences
in length.
Tape the article to a clean sheet of paper.
With a YELLOW pencil or pen, underline and
number all the conjunction in the article.
On the paper, identify the type of conjunction it
is.

Due Tomorrow at the beginning of class.