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CHEESE

WHAT IS CHEESE

CHEESE IS A SOLID FOOD MADE
FROM MILK OF RUMIANT
MAMMALS
LIKE:
Cow, goat, sheep, buffalo, camel,
etc.
MILK TYPE
Goats Milk/Chvre: Many people prefer goat's milk due
to the low fat content and nutritious ingredients. It also
has less lactose.

Ewes/Sheeps Milk Cheeses: Since sheep will typically
give out less milk than cows or goats, this cheese is
harder to find, as well as more expensive.


Mixed Milk Cheese: Cheese that has been made from a
combination with two or more different types of milk.

Raw Milk Cheeses: Most connoisseurs assure that pasteurization,
a process of heat-treating food at temperatures above 63
Fahrenheit to kill disease-causing organisms, kills the flavor of
the fromage. Must be processed very quickly and very carefully
to avoid contamination and should be aged for a minimum of
sixty days.


Plus using a combination of cuajo through: bacteria, molds, levels of cream, time,
treatments, races of the animals, diets of the animals, herbs, species, smoked, if the milk
is pasteurized or not; plus acidity of lemon juice or vinegar.
HISTORY OF CHEESES
The origins are unknown, people think that was when he began to
domestic a sheep 8000 b. C...Also by accident, keeping the milk in a pot
made of the stomach of animals and the high temperature of the
climate. After to preserve milk adding salt.
Romans started to produce cheese for their long journeys
In the twentieth century through discoveries in bacteriology,
chemistry and technical cheeses have been modernized but have not
lost the artisan touch.



PRODUCTION
Production under 4 categories under strict rules:

FARMER: a farmhouse cheese where the milk is produced
ARTESANAL: small quantities using milk from their own farm, but may
also purchase milk from local farms.
COOPERATIVE: milk producers in an area that they have joined to
produce cheese alike to some industrial producers.
INDUSTRIALS: milk resources are from local or regional perhaps all over
the country.

COMSUMPTION
U.S. is the worlds largest producer followed by Germany and France.
France is the largest exporter and U.S. only use cheeses for their own
domestic demand.
Greece is the largest consumer, they love feta cheese.
France is the second with emmental and camembet.
Italy is the third in consumption.
U.S. is the fourth and increasing in consumption. Mozzarella cheese is
the favorite for pizzas.




HOW TO MAKE CHEESE
HOW TO MAKE RICCOTTA CHEESE
Step 1: Heat the Whey

Step 2: Strain the Whey
Step 3: Drain
Step 4: Thats it
CLASSIFICATION
BY TEXTURE
SOFT
Often spread on bread or crackers to be served as snacks.
Usually not used for cooking.
Most of them should be used within a few days of purchase,
they spoil faster than firmer cheeses.


Ambert Brie Manouri
Bakers Camembert Stracchino
Baladi kochkse Teleme
Bergader Liederkranz Chaource
Boursault Livarot Brinza
BRIE CAMEMBERT
Soft Fresh Cheeses

Unripened and generally have a fresh, clean, creamy flavor.
Typically the most perishable and are sometimes held in brines.
Ricotta cheese: The name literally means recook. It is commonly
used in Italian cooking as a filling for pastas or as a base for
cheesecakes.
Mascarpone: fresh cheese made by curdling heavy cream with
citric acid. Tiramis.

VARIETY COMMON CULINARY USES
Chvre Spread, filling, in salad
Cottage cheese With fruit, in dip
Cream cheese Spread, cooking ingredient, in
cheesecake, in dip
Feta In salad
Fromage blanc Cooking ingredient
Mascarpone With fruit, in Tiramisu, to enrich
dishes
Mozzarella Pizza, pasta, in a Caprese salad
Ricotta Cooking ingredient, desserts,
filling for cannoli
Boursin Spread
MOZZARELLA
RICOTTA
MASCARPONE
Soft Ripened Cheeses

Have typically been sprayed or dusted with a mold and allowed to
ripen.
Should be eaten only when properly ripened.

VARIETY COMMON CULINARY USES
Brie Sandwiches, salads, table cheese.
Camebert Sandwiches, table cheese.
Explorateur Table cheese, excellent with
Champagne.
EXPLORATEUR
SEMIHARD
semi-firm
Usually become crumblier and more pungent as they age, but while
young they are firm and flavourful.
Tend to be on the drier side, but not hard and crumbly, just firm.
Tend to melt quite easily.
Most semi-firm cheeses are pressed during production to remove
moisture.
Great for snacks and sandwiches, and many can be cooked
without becoming rubbery or oily.
Many can last about 1-2 months in the refrigerator if the package
isn't opened, 3-4 weeks if opened, and 2 weeks if sliced.

ASIAGO
Beaufort Colby
Port salut Cheddar
Edam Manchego
Gouda Zamorano
Asiago Gloucester
Bel Paese Havarti
Taleggio Abondance
Mahon Caciotta
Emmental Danbo
Gruyere Oaxaca
BEL
PAESE
EMMENTAL
GRUYERE
CHEDDAR BEAUFORT GLOUCESTER
HARD
firm cheeses = hard cheeses = grating cheeses
More pungent as they age, so most of the cheeses in this category
pack a lot of flavour.
Often grated onto pasta dishes.
Cheeses have a much longer shelf life than their softer counterparts.
Crumbly and dry, but not shrivelled up. Great for crumbling and
grating, some of the most popular hard cheeses are Italian.
The aging gives them that dry texture, but it also gives hard cheese
much more pungency and character.

JARLSBERG

Parmesan
Romano Pecorino
Provolone
Dry Jack
Grana Padano
Sap sago
Sbrinz
Mimolette
Kefalotyri
Cantal
Jarlsberg
PARMESAN
DRY
JACK
GRANA PADANO
SAP SAGO
SBRINZ
MIMOLETTE
BLUE
blue cheese = blue-veined cheese
Aged for several months in a humid cave or in a curing room.
Production similar to soft or semi-firm cheeses
Aging for several months in humid cave or curing room
Pierced with skewers to help the air circulate through the cheese
and facilitate the creation of blue veins
Blue cheese, either crumbled or in a dressing, nicely balances bitter
greens in salads. Also pair it with bread, crackers, or fruit for an
appetizer, or let it melt on pasta or grilled meats.
Stilton is the most renown blue cheese.
GORGONZOLA
ROQUEFORT
Varieties that are best for:
Dressing salads: Stilton, Roquefort, Bavarian blue, Gorgonzola,
Cabrales.
Snacking: Gorgonzola, Saga blue, Stilton, Bleu d'Auvergne.
Melting on meats: Cabrales, Gorgonzola, Picon.
Dressing pasta: Roquefort, Maytag Blue, Gorgonzola, Danish Blue.
Dessert: Saga blue, Stilton, Roquefort, Gorgonzola.

STILTON
CABRALES
SAGA
BLUE
PICON
DANISH
BLUE
MOISTURE CONTENT

CLASSIFICATION PERCENT MOISTURE CHEESE TEXTURE EXAMPLES
Low moisture 1334 % Very hard Parmesan, Romano
Medium moisture 3445 % Hard/semi-hard
Cheddar, Swiss, Gouda,
Edam
High moisture 4555 % Soft Mozzarella, blue, Brie
Very high moisture 5580 % Very soft Cottage, cream, ricotta
MOST IMPORTANT
CHEESES

FRENCH CHEESES
GREEK CHEESE
DUTCH CHEESE
ITALIAN CHEESE
SPANISH CHEESE
SWISS CHEESE
ENGLISH CHEESE
U.S. CHEESE
HOW TO SERVE CHEESE

TYPICAL TRAY ON BOARD
HOW TO PAIR CHEESE

Pairing cheese with wine is often a matter of personal preference.
However, you must consider how strong flavors when you PAIR
wine with cheese so AND neither OF THEM dominates the other.
ONE for example, DONT PAIR a strong cabernet with a soft and
fresh mozzarella because the delicate flavors of the cheeses will
be overwhelmed by the dominant flavors of the wine.
INSTRUCTIONS
1. Choose the type of wine you want to drink. The
cheese you choose depends on the type of
wine you choose.
2. Cheeses strong should be paired with stronger
wines, such as Bordeaux or Cabernet. Softer
cheeses go best with delicate wines, as a
Sauvignon Blanc or Pinot Grigio.
3. Pair drier white wines such as Chardonnay,
Pinot Grigio and Sauvignon Blanc with fresh
mozzarella, Brie, Gouda, Swiss baby and mild
cheddar cheese.
4. Pair sweet white wines, such as Riesling or a
wine of Sauternes, with Fontina, Roquefort,
Stilton and Provolone.
5. Select cheeses aged for Cabernet Sauvignon.
Choose a Gouda, Cheddar, Provolone or Le
Moulis aged when you are drinking Cabernet.

6. Pair Smoked Gouda, Creamy Gorgonzola,
Havarti, Gruyere, smoked Swiss or smoked
Cheddar with more aromatic wines like
Zinfandel, Syrah, Shiraz and Pinot Noir.
7. Selects aged Cheddar, aged Swiss, Asiago,
Pont L'EVEQUE and Taleggio for Merlot.
8. Select a triple cream cheese for Champagne
and sparkling wines. triple cream cheeses are
similar to cream cheese in texture and body

SOMMELIER TIPS
When in doubt, follow these simple rules

Cheese and wines from the same region will
typically go well together.
Cheese with a high fat content = Smooth, oily
wine
Cheese with high acidity = Sweet, alcoholic
wine
Salty cheese = Acid wines

Most Popular Cheese and their
Wine Pairings

Cheese Wine
Swiss Asti Spumanti
Blue Port, Madeira
Boursin Gewurztraimer
Brie (French) Sweet sherry
Camamber Cabernet, Chenin Blanc
Mild Cheddar Chardonnay
Strong Cheddar Cabernet, Rioja, Sauvignon Blanc
Chevre Gewuerztraimer
Danish Blue Cabernet
Edam Riesling
Feta Beaujolais
Gorgonzola Sauternes, Bourdax
Gouda Riesling
Gruyere Chardonnay, Saubignon Blanc
Havarti Bodeaux, Rioja
Muenster Beaujolais, Zinfandel
Provolone Chardonnay
Roquefort Port
Stilton Port