Introduction to Six Traits

What is it? Who developed it? What is its purpose? Which Six Traits model  are we using? • How does Six Traits fit  with Calkins? • • • •
   

What is Six Traits?
Six Traits is • an assessment tool •  “a method of looking at the main characteristics of  writing and assessing them independent from one  another.”  R. Culham, The 6 + 1 Trait Model • “an assessment tool that works in concert with the  curriculum.”  It was “never intended to be the writing  curriculum.” R. Culham
   

The most common method of assessing  writing is holistic assessment.  Typically, a  composition is read, evaluated according to a  list of criteria, and assigned a number on a  scale estimating its quality relative to the  criteria.

 

 

Holistic Assessment
QuickTimeª and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

Scored holistically, this  fourth grade paper, might be  given a 3 on scale of 1 to 4,  suggesting that on the whole  it is a fairly good paper for a  student this age.

QuickTimeª and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

 

 

Analytic Assessment
QuickTimeª and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

Six Traits is an analytic  assessment tool.  That means  that each characteristic of a  piece of writing is evaluated  separately.   For instance, in  an analytic model we might  look first at organization:

QuickTimeª and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

 

 

Organization
√ Central idea clearly stated in introductory     paragraph
QuickTimeª and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

Focus

√ A single example illustrating main idea is     developed in depth over several paragraphs √ Lots  of details give the reader a clear picture     of the action √ The narrator includes his reaction

Development

√ Writer generalizes lesson / assigns larger     meaning to this experience

Analysis

QuickTimeª and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

√ Central idea restated with added twist.  

Focus

 

Organization
and conclude that that this paper  is well organized.
QuickTimeª and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

Similarly, in an analytic  assessment we would look at  other characteristics, such as • • • • •
 

QuickTimeª and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

Idea Development Word choice Voice Sentence fluency Conventions

 

QuickTimeª and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

and make a determination about each  of the other characteristics. Generally speaking, the information  we get using analytic assessment is  much more detailed and useful than  that gleaned from holistic assessment.

QuickTimeª and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

 

 

Where did Six Traits come from?
The Six Traits model was developed in the 1980s by a  group of researchers at the Northwest Regional  Educational Laboratory (NWREL)in Portland, Oregon.    It is derived from the work of Paul Diederich, Alan  Purves, and other writing researchers who studied and  wrote extensively about the characteristics of writing  beginning in the 1970’s.

 

 

NWREL researchers focused on the notion of empirical  evidence ­ observable evidence within the composition  itself ­ as the basis for useful analytic assessment. They focused on six specific characteristics or qualities  of writing:

 

 

Ideas
The content of the piece of writing ­ the heart of the message.

 

 

Organization
The internal structure of the piece, the thread of meaning, the  logical pattern of the ideas.

 

 

Voice
The singular style that the writer brings to bear in the piece,  revealing his or her feelings and convictions toward the  subject matter.

 

 

Word Choice
The words, phrases, and expressions the writer incorporates  into his or her writing.  We often think of word choice as  “rich,” “colorful,”  “precise,” or “evocative.”

 

 

Sentence Fluency
The flow of the language, the sound of the word patterns ­ the  way the writing plays to the ear, not just to the eye.

 

 

Conventions
The correctness of the piece… the extent to which the writer  uses grammar and mechanics with precision.

 

 

What is the purpose of Six  Traits?
Ultimately, by adopting a common assessment tool we hope to • Develop a shared understanding of what “good” writing  looks like • Use a common vocabulary across grades and across  disciplines to describe qualities of writing • Practice assessing with consistency and accuracy • Provide meaningful feedback to students • Align assessment with instruction to enhance our  teaching of writing.
   

Which Six Traits Model are we  Using?
    A number of iterations of Six Traits have developed  over the past few years.  We are using the most widely  used version, the version that was developed by  NWREL manager Ruth Culham and published in her  two books  

 

 

QuickTimeª and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

QuickTimeª and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

 

 

    The rubrics and the descriptors we are using in Newton  are Culham’s rubrics and descriptors.
 

 

 

How does Six Traits fit  with Calkins?
The simple answer is, it fits beautifully.  Ruth  Culham is a fan of Lucy Calkins’ and quotes  her frequently in her books.  She is very clear  that the Six Traits analytic assessment tool is  meant to complement ­ not displace ­ the  writing workshop model.

 

 

A few critical things to  know …
• When Culham refers to “6 + 1 Traits of Writing.”  She  is referring to Presentation as the additional trait.  We  are not using this trait in our model. In grades 3­5, we have added Author’s Craft ­ the  deliberate use of narrative or expository techniques to  enhance storytelling or the delivery of information ­ to  our rubric.  

 

 

We have changed Culham’s language slightly in grades  K­2.  Our five categories of progress are

             1                        2                    3                      4                     5 Ready to Begin     Exploring     Developing     Expanding      Soaring

 

 

4.

The K­2 rubric is a three­year developmental  continuum.    That is, we expect most students to  advance across the rubric over three years.  Most  students in kindergarten would not be expected to  advance past the exploring stage by the end of  kindergarten.   

          1                        2                    3                      4 
                   5 Ready to Begin     Exploring     Developing     Expanding      Soaring
   

5.

By design, the 3­5 rubric has 5 categories

          1                    2                     3                      4    
              5     Beginning     Emerging      Developing      Effective      Strong

 

 

    but descriptors for only categories 1, 3, and 5

          1                    2                     3                      4    
              5     Beginning     Emerging      Developing      Effective      Strong

 

 

     This is to give 

QuickTimeª and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

teachers added  flexibility in scoring  a piece for a given  trait.  If a particular  trait seems to be  above level 3 but  does not match the  language of level 5,  we will call it a 4. 

 

 

 

      The 3­5 rubric is the 

QuickTimeª and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor are needed to see this picture.

same for each grade, but  is meant to be a measure  of grade­level  sophistication. Over time,  we will develop specific  anchor papers and  exemplars to represent the  level of sophistication for  each grade.  We would expect most  students to perform in the  4 or 5 band for most traits  by the end of the year. 

 

 

Finally,
• When scoring student work in the classroom, it is acceptable, even  advisable, to shade the difference between two categories as you feel  necessary.  That is, you may assign a score of 4/5 or 4+ to a paper that  seems to be not quite a 5 but fairly close for a given trait.  After all,  the purpose of this tool is to give accurate, differentiated feedback in a  positive way. For the purposes of today’s workshop, we would ask that you assign  only whole category scores to each paper for each trait.  That is, for  today’s training session, please assign a score of 3 or 4, not a 3/4.   Talk over discrepancies with your colleagues and try to make a  decision.

 

 

Introduction to Six Traits

The End

 

 

Writing mini­lesson debriefing

QuickTimeª and a Cinepak decompressor are needed to see this picture.