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SYSTEMATIC MAINTENANCE APPROACH

ABOUT THE SPEAKER


ARMANDO R. DIAZ
Master of Science in Business Administration (MBA)
Registered ASEAN Engineer
Professional Electrical Engineer ( PEE )
Certified Plant Mechanic( CPM )
Accredited Pollution Control Officer
Licensed Professional Electrical Engineer with more than 35 years experience in
the field of building and facility design and consultancy, construction, operations
and maintenance involving various mechanical, and electrical equipment and
systems.
Awarded 1998 as Most Outstanding Practitioner in Industry of the Philippine
2009 IIEE Vice-President for External Affairs
Awarded 2006 as IIEE FELLOW
Member : Society of Philippine Accredited Consultant
Energy Efficient Practitioner Ass. of the Philippine
Recipient of Various Civic Awards : Rotary,REACT,YMCA,LOBSET and MARS
SYSTEMATIC MAINTENANCE
Speaker Profile

Armando Mandy Diaz is Professional Electrical Engineer with Master
in Business Administration (MBA); 1998 Most Outstanding Electrical
Engineer Practitioner in Industry of the Philippines, Former Region IV
IIEE Governor; with almost 30 years extensive industry experience on
Engineering and Maintenance having served as Asst. Vice President
of Uni-Lonseal Plastics Inc. and in various positions in different
industries such as Universal Robinson Corp., Manila Midtown Hotel,
International Rice Research Inst. and Unitech Engineering Corp.

ENGINEERING CONSULTANCY SERVICES
SPECIALIZATION:Engineering,Operation, Repair and
Maintenance

8/18/2014
Plant
Equipment
Building
Facilities
.. and among others in
Maintenance refers to all activities
which assists in
GOOD CONDITION
KEEPING
8/18/2014
Why Is MAINTENANCE so
special?
Any person in charge of maintenance
whether small or large company feels
that his is a unique field.
It presents as great challenge to a
persons engineering abilities as is to
his management know how.
It requires as much tact and tolerance
as it requires patience and persistence -
in fact it requires ...
8/18/2014
SUPERMAN
8/18/2014
- What does MAINTENANCE have to achieve?
OBJECTIVES
Yes No Remarks
Operational objectives:
1. To maintain equipment
(a) in acceptable condition
(b) in top operating conditions
2. To ensure maximum availability for plant and
equipment at reasonable cost
3. To provide service that will avert breakdowns at all
times at any cost
4. To extend plant life to the last limit?
6. To ensure high - quality performance.
7. To ensure safe and efficient operation at all times
8. To maximize output over the next five years
9. To maintain a reasonably good appearance of plant
10. To maintain a plant spotlessly clean at all times
5. To maintain plant and equipment with maximum
economy and to replace at predetermined periods
Which is the following objectives apply in your company?
8/18/2014
Yes No Remarks
Cost objectives
1. To minimize maintenance expenditure and to
maximize profits
3. To provide funds as a ratio of sales volume
production investment
5. To allow a certain amount of contingencies, tooling
and incidentals at the discretion of the maintenance
executive
Which is the following objectives apply in your company?
2. To provide maintenance service within the limits of
a budgeted amount
4. To have maintenance expenditure on the amount of
service required by plant and equipment in view of
its age and its rate of utilization.
- What does MAINTENANCE have to achieve?
OBJECTIVES
8/18/2014
- What do we expect to gain from good
maintenance?
BENEFITS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Expressed in terms of Important for
Book value Utilization of capital
Higher plant availability Utilization of capital
Reduced scrap and inferior
grades
Value of output
On- time deliveries, less
delay penalties
Customer relations
Maintenance costs Maintenance Economy
Inventory carrying costs Capital utilization
Lower plant cost per unit of
product
Unit costing
Extended plant life
Uninterrupted production
Improved quality of
production
Reduced production delays
Reduced costs of repairs
Less stand- by plant and
spares
Improved equipment
replacement
The Factors
A. Financial benefits
8/18/2014
- What do we expect to gain from good
maintenance?
BENEFITS
Expressed in
terms of
Important for
1.
Co-ordination between
production and
maintenance
Improved
understanding
Internal planning
2. Manpower planning
Unproductive
time
Manpower
utilization
3. Planning of deliveries Cost of delays Plant utilization
The Factors
B. Organizational Advantages
8/18/2014
- What do we expect to gain from good
maintenance?
BENEFITS
Expressed in terms of Important for
1.
Improved equipment
suitability
Better choice of
machines
Optimum
production
2.
Build up of technical
data
Better and more
accurate information
Standard of
technical
3.
Improved maintenance
schedules
Minimum maintenance
costs
Plant
availability
4.
Improved plant
condition
Performance and
reliability
Operating
efficiency
The Factors
C. Technical advantages
8/18/2014
- What do we expect to gain from good
maintenance?
BENEFITS
Expressed in terms of Important for
1. Increased safety
Losses due to claims and
less production costs
Production
economy
2.
Improved
housekeeping
Tidiness of shop floors Workers' morale
3.
Less friction,
better relations
Harmonious relationships Staff relations
The Factors
D. Human considerations
8/18/2014
- What do we expect to gain from good
maintenance?
BENEFITS
Expressed in
terms of
Important
for
1.
Reliable delivery
dates
Improved
reputation
Sales
promotions
2.
"Showcase"
housekeeping
Better public
image
Company
image
The Factors
E. Customer relations
8/18/2014
- By what means shall we proceed, within limits
shall we try to work towards our objectives?
POLICIES
Maintenance
Policies
1
Management
Policies
Personnel
practices
Union
Relations
Financial
Objective
Production
operations
4
6
5
3
2
8/18/2014
MAINTENANCE
ORGANIZATION
INSTALLATION
AND
OVERHAULS
PLANNED
PREVENTIVE
MAINTENANCE
BUILDING ELECTRICAL MECHANICAL
LUBRICATION
INSPECTIONS
ADJUSTMENT
ROUTINE
MAINTENANCE
OPERATORS ELECTRICAL MECHANICAL
PRODUCTION /
SHIFT
MAINTENANCE
REPAIR CREW
REPAIR
MAINTENANCE
BOILER
COMPRESSORS
TOOL ROOM
UTILITIES /
FACILITIES
MAINTENANCE MANAGER
What does MAINTENANCE really
do?
What constitutes maintenance work?

What are the functions of our
maintenance department?

What do we expect of maintenance?
What Constitutes MAINTENANCE work?
Training of Maintenance Staff
Training of Production Operators
Testing parts for suitability and availability
Planning servicing schedule
Improvement and modification
Protective painting
Spare parts availability
Housekeeping
Apart from the obvious jobs of repair, lubrication, overhauls,
inspection and replacement of parts, there are others which
are less immediately evident. Among these duties we find:
What are the FUNCTIONS of MAINTENANCE DEPT?
The grouping-together of complete plant and equipment
inventory is as if we were to say, look, this is what we
to maintain

Management and administrative duties which have to be
assigned to the maintenance staff to cover the life of
plant at its various stage.

The type of service required by the plant

The degree of planning involved, such as emergencies,
periodically, repeated cycles or do-it-any-odd-timejobs

The reasons for doing the jobs e.g. repair of breakdown,
prevention of failure detection of faults, etc..
What do we EXPECT of
MAINTENANCE?
What is expected of
maintenance depends on WHO
does the expecting.
Planning the System of
Maintenance
Poorly organized maintenance
department are not hard to
find
Here are some of the opinions taken from a rich
collection acquired over the years:
Our machines are so old that no amount of maintenance will help them.
Anyway, we are planning to replace them

The equipment is brand new and highly automatic, all it needs is a few drops of
oil in the right place.

We have had no trouble for many years just as we are, these are study
machines so why worry?

Our operators have instructions to take good care of their machines and it
works!

We have tried to get experienced men for years, but in this area, they are
simply not available.

We rely on outside contractors. They are right next door, you know!

Our foremen knows all the machines like the back of his hand, we do not need
a system to tell us whats wrong

We have bunch of good labs,they work hard and would resent being tied down
by procedures

We get all our figures from accounting.

LOOP OF SYSTEMATIC ACTION
will tell us the best way to develop
maintenance service

will have us to establish:

WHAT is to be done, and WHY

HOW the work is to be done, and WHEN
the job and WHO is to do it
1. Design Improvements
2. Change of schedules
3. Service specifications
Plant Data
Equipment Utilization Finances
Groups
Number of Units
Condition, etc.
Policies
Utilization
Seasonal Loads
Budgets
Investment
Depreciation
Recording of Relevant Data
Breakdown Elimination

1. Management techniques
2. Clerical procedures
3. Technological Practices
4. Personnel management
5. Financial/operational controls

Analysis of need

Implementation

Planning and
Scheduling

Controls


Reporting


FOUR SYSTEM OF
MAINTENANCE
Breakdown Maintenance
Dont do a thing until you see smoke
rising
Normally this approach is referred to as a repair
maintenance but it is not in the true sense a
system at all because there is no service is carried
out unless a failure has occurred. In so doing,
what we really needs on this approach is obtaining
full information of breakdowns. Having these
formations, discussions has to be done for us to
arrive a solution to avert recurrence of the same
nature by:

Re-designing or improving part or component
Re-scheduling maintenance service
Altering operating instructions
Changing the process
Re-training/orientation of Personnel

Breakdown Maintenance
Routine Maintenance
Simple Service in a regular way or as much
as we can afford
Under this system, there are two level of
maintenance namely FIRST and SECOND.
Under the first Level Maintenance, there is
no tools or equipment needed. Only the
five senses is necessary :
Smelling Hearing
Seeing
Feeling
Tasting
Routine Maintenance
Second Level Maintenance, some activities are:
Lubrication on daily, weekly and monthly
and yearly basis
Changing and cleaning of filters on
specified time


Routine Maintenance
Servicing of Air Compressor every quarter

Simply, Routine Maintenance is a
procedure being followed on a
documented procedure known to as
CHECKLIST.
DATE __________________ TIME __________________
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1 EXTRUSION
=211+R12-M021 Rotary Valve Big Bag Station Motor
=213+R12-M011 Vaccum Feeder MB1 Motor
=213+R12-M013 Vaccum Feeder Pearlized Motor
=216+S11-M011 Granulate Con. Fan Ext. Feeding
=216+S11-M021 Hopper Mixer Motor
=311+H12-M131 Main Extrusion Gear Oil Pump 1
=214+S11-M023 Dos. Unit Coex2 MB2 Suction Motor
LEGEND : 3 Normal s For Repair / with abnormalities
m
Not Applicable & Need Urgent repair
Checked By: Noted By:
SAMPLE DAILY CHECKLIST
DESCRIPTION REMARKS
EQPT.
Item
No.
PLACE of INSPECTION DESCRIPTION CRITERIA METHOD 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
1 Roll No. 1
WITHIN RATED
VISUAL
2 Roll No. 2
WITHIN RATED
VISUAL
3 Roll No. 3
WITHIN RATED
VISUAL
4 Roll No. 4
WITHIN RATED
VISUAL
5 LUB. ROLL 1
TEMP. & FLOW
Below 90 &
Continous
VISUAL
6 LUB. ROLL 2
TEMP. & FLOW
Below 90 &
Continous
VISUAL
7 LUB. ROLL 3
TEMP. & FLOW
Below 90 &
Continous
VISUAL
8 LUB. ROLL 4
TEMP. & FLOW
Below 90 &
Continous
VISUAL
9 LUB. GEAR BOX
APPROPRIATE
LUBRICATION
CONTINUOS VISUAL
10 ROLL CROSS HYDRAULIC
HYDRAULIC
MARKER
90 KG/CM
2
VISUAL
11 QUICK OPEN
HYDRAULIC
MARKER
200 KG/CM
2
VISUAL
12
MAIN MOTOR SHAFT &
BRG. TEMPERATURE
NORMAL
HAND
13 WHOLE
SOUND SMELL &
VIBRATION
SAME
EYE, EAR,
NOSE &
HAND
14 WHOLE GOOD VISUAL
15
Legend
3
= NORMAL D =FOR REPAIR
O = FOLLOW UP
O
=URGENT
Shift -In- Charge: _________ _________ _________ Section Leader : _____________ _______________
DAILY CHECK LIST__________________________ YEAR ________ MONTH__________________
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=214+S11-M054 Dos. Unit Coex2 MB2 Dosing Motor
=214+S11-M025 Dos. Unit Coex2 MB3 Suction Motor
=214+S11-M056 Dos. Unit Coex2 MB3 Dosing Motor
=214+S11-M027 Dos. Unit Coex2 Copo Suction Motor
=214+S11-M058 Dos. Unit Coex2 Copo Dosing Motor
=214+S11-M040 Dosing Unit Coex1 Mixer Motor
=214+S11-M050 Dosing Unit Coex2 Mixer Motor
=915+A15-M015 Coextruder #1 DC Motor
=916+A16-M015 Coextruder #2 DC Motor
=315+A15-M211 Co-extrusion #1 Gear Pump Motor
=316+A16-M211 Co-extrusion #2 Gear Pump Motor
=321+A72-M021 Air Knife Fan Motor
2 REGRANULATION
=392+A92-M031 Waste Grinder Motor
=392+A92-M055 Feed Rolls Top DC Motor
=392+A92-M075 Feed Rolls Bottom DC Motor
=392+A92-M037 Waste Grinder Hydraulic Pump Motor
Compactor Hydraulic Pump Motor
Erema Extruder Motor
=392+A92-M044 Erema Conveyor Belt Motor
Erema Pelletizing Head Motor
LEGEND : 3 Normal s For Repair / with abnormalities
m Not Applicable k Need Urgent repair
Checked By: Noted By:
ELECTRICAL DAILY CHECKLIST
DESCRIPTION REMARKS
Planned Maintenance
According to the needs of the
equipment and utilization, specified
on annual time scale.
Team effort is the key for the success
of the equipment and utilization
specified on annual time scale.


Planned Maintenance
As a rule the following activities are
included on the plan.

Inspections
Replacement of parts if found
necessary
parts and materials preparation

Planned Maintenance
Recording after the job is very
important
Adjustment and calibration

All other activities and lastly

Well do anything to prevent breakdowns
Preventive Maintenance
Normally this applies to system which strive to reduce the
likelihood of failures such as aircraft operation, power
stations, or critical installations in case of mines
ventilation.


This approach is very costly and need some statistical
data and analysis. To established this system
immediately, we need information on the manufacturer for
the life of their machine.

Preventive Maintenance
To achieve the prevention of breakdowns, planned service
is carried out with the explicit additional objective of
detecting weak points and ensuring perfect functioning by
replacing parts which could still be used were it need for
the assurance that we required.


Thus after the service a machine is as good as new and
high degree of reliability.

Preventive Maintenance
Naturally, the cost of running this system
is high and it is therefore be applied
only in the cases of
absolute necessity.
Preventive Maintenance
STEPS IN PREPARATION OF
MAINTENANCE PROGRAM
1. Identify and list all equipment installed to be maintained
2. Provide checklist for the equipment and machines (First Level
Maintenance)
3. Provide service schedule as per manufacturers recommendation or
industry standard (Second Level Maintenance)
4. Prepare Plan Maintenance Schedule for one year
5. Prepare Preventive Maintenance just after you have statistical data or
knowledge
6. Attach service control tag to equipment
7. Implement and monitor all maintenance schedules
8. Record all activities to Equipment History Card (EHC)

PAPERWORK
Paperwork performs the following important task :

INITIATES action, by identifying the job and the date
COLLECTS data, by describing the action taken
CONTROLS operation, by recording the input of resources


By taking these tasks, we can ensure:

The RELEVANCE of data
Their ACCURACY
Their RETRIEVABILITY


FORMS...
There is no right or wrong form

Form design is a function for the needs of application

But of course the simple rule is the

simpler the better

PLANNING preparatory work which define the job
WHOM or by WHAT craft it should be done and
what sequence

PLANNING and SCHEDULING

SCHEDULING refers to the timing of the job
WHEN and WHERE
it is to be done
Maintenance hour is shared
among the following
a. Routine Schedules

b. Planned Maintenance

c. Preventive Maintenance

d. Irregular and unforeseen jobs

e. overhauls,plant shutdowns or project work

TYPES OF WORKLOAD IMPLEMENTATION


Routine service schedules:
lubrication, inspection, replacements





Planned Maintenance




Preventive Maintenance






Irregular Jobs and
Emergencies




Overhauls, new installations
and/or large-scale jobs

Routine Maintenance /
Inspection Tags
STORES
or
STOCKROOM
Problems relating to the operation of
maintenance stores
A.Organizational Problems

B. Procedural Problems
C.Physical Facilities
D. Items Stocked
E. Economics
Problems relating to the operation of
maintenance stores
A.Organizational Problems
Staffing
Authority to receive , issue ,
inspect , reject
Responsibility to stock
Reporting to what function

B. Procedural Problems
Issuance and receiving procedures
Stock control method ; reordering
point
Paperwork sequence
Dealing with scrapped,salvaged, and
reconditioned parts
Inventory codes of stock items
Inventory taking
Problems relating to the operation of
maintenance stores

C.Physical Facilities
Size of
stores,layout,gates,mezzanines,etc.
Shelving and marking
Lifting and transporting devices
Safety measured , security
Lighting,humidity control,pest
control,etc.

Problems relating to the operation of
maintenance stores

D. Items Stocked
Supply of tools and instruments
Grouping of materials
Storing and preservation of spare parts
Storing of standby unit
Standardization
Elimination of obsolete items

Problems relating to the operation of
maintenance stores

E. Economics
Reordering quantity
Turnover rate of stock
Depreciation and interest rate
Obsolescence
Costing of items
Contract suppliers
Make or Buy decision
Problems relating to the operation of
maintenance stores
Rule-of-Thumb in determining re-ordering
point
a.Classify into FAST,MEDIUM and SLOW-MOVING items

b.Fixed-interval,fixed quantity orders can be placed as
constant consumption rate

c.Maximum/minimum methods for costly items requiring
yearly reviews for obsolescence and turnover
STOCK CONTROL
Analytical Method in Determining Re-
ordering point
Number of machine using the same parts
Average rate of usage
Restocking lead time(delivery period)
Cost of tied-up capital
Available storage space
Cost of order(economic batch size)
Risk of obsolescence
STOCK CONTROL
An Approach to Replacement
Procedures
Replacement problems of plant
equipment and machine relate to the
following managerial functions:
PRODUCTION - the user of equipment
MANAGEMENT - the provider of money
MAINTENANCE -the adviser on replacement
STOCK CONTROL
An Approach to Replacement
Procedures
A good maintenance system will enable
MAINTENANCE MANAGER to fulfill the
role exceptionally well especially in providing
relevant data of service
STOCK CONTROL
Instances relating to replacement as direct
outcome of mechanical/electrical deterioration
Wear and Tear
In-accuracy and lack of uniformity of product
Low degree of reliability
High frequency of stoppages
Increased safety hazard
Excessive power consumption
Rising maintenance cost
STOCK CONTROL
HUMAN ELEMENT
Maintenance personnel
gets upset because of
frustration
EXPRESSIONS OFTEN HEARD
Theres nobody to talk to.They simply
wont listen
Its dead-end job,no use in trying
Why hurry?the
stores/parts/tools/supervisors will hold
up anyhow
Its a dirty job , they blame you for
everything
Factors that will help in
creating proper mind-set
good morale
Management Policies- which relates
directly or indirectly to maintenance

Working Conditions and Relationship-
under which work is perform

Personnel Policies-which are in force
Areas that can be profitably
investigated to improve current
situation
The available manpower
potential(experience,training and skill)
Morale boosters
Competence of supervisors
Maintenance Manager job performance
Incentives to good workers performance
A GOOD MAINTENANCE
WORKER
He must be inquisitive and resourceful

He must be adaptable and self-sufficient

He must be dependable and responsible

He must be keen to learn and interested to his trade

He must be able to observe and visualize

He must be co-operative and helpful
He must be healthy in body

He must be emotionally stable

He must be safety conscious for himself and to
his fellow workers

He must able to work under pressure

He must be alert and posses keen senses

He must always try to do a good job

A GOOD MAINTENANCE
WORKER
DATE: TIME:
LEGEND :
3 Normal s For Repair / with abnormalities
m Not Applicable k Need Urgent repair
1 2 3
EVAPORATOR PRESSURE 1
CONDENSER PRESSURE 1
EVAPORATOR PRESSURE 2
CONDENSER PRESSURE 3
EVAPORATOR ENTERING WATER TEMP
EVAPORATOR LEAVING WATER TEMP
OUTDOOR AIR TEMP
CHECKED BY: NOTED BY:
FIRST SHIFT SECOND SHIFT THIRD SHIFT
CHILLER
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ACTIVE CHILLED WATER SET POINT(SP)
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PACKAGE DISCHARGE PRESSURE (RATED)
FIRST STAGE DISCHARGE TEMP (250 C)
SECOND STAGE INLET TEMP( 60 C)
PACKAGE DISCHARGE TEMP (60 C)
BEARING OIL TEMP( 76.7 C)
TOTAL HOURS
LOADED HOURS
OIL LEVEL
NOISE / VIBRATION
WHOLE
OTHER / REMARKS
AIR COMPRESSOR
AIR COMPRESSOR
OIL PRESSURE (2.7 TO 3.5)
LEAKS
NOISE / VIBRATION
FUEL PRESSURE (22 TO 30)
UTILITIES DAILY CHECKLIST
HOT OIL BURNER
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SMOKE/ STACK
SET POINT (SP) vs PROCESS VARIABLE(PV)
ALARM
OIL FLOW (.25 TO .34)
DATE :
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Main Extrusion Gear Oil Pump 1
Main Extrusion Gear Oil Pump 2
Co-Extruder 1 Gear Oil Pump
Co-Extruder 2 Gear Oil Pump
Waste Grinder Hydraulic Pump
Compactor Hydraulic Pump Motor
TDO Chain Lubrication Pump Inlet
TDO Chain Lubrication Pump Outlet
TDO Bolt Lubrication Pump
TDO Hydraulic Pump Chain Tension
TDO Edge Guide PneumoHydralic Pump OS
TDO Edge Guide PneumoHydralic Pump DS
Edge Trim Grinder Hydraulic Pump Motor
Winder Hydraulic Pump Motor
Main Slitter Hydraulic Pump
Secondary Slitter 1 Hydraulic Pack
Secondary Slitter 2 Hydraulic Pack
Secondary Slitter 1 Edge Guide Hydraulic
Secondary Slitter 2 Edge Guide Hydraulic
Cigarette Slitter Hydraulic Pump
LEGEND :
3
Normal
s
For Repair / with abnormalities
m
Not Applicable
k
Need Urgent repair
Checked By: Noted By:
WEEKLY HYDRAULICS CHECKLIST
EQUIPMENT
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
DATE:
ACU Location Full Load Ampere
Capacity Ampere
Voltage Phase
Remarks: Remarks:
Compressor d Leak of R-22 /Oil d
Fan Motor 1 Water Leak 1
Fan Blower 1 Drain Fan 1
Fan Blade 1 Suction Pressure 1
Air Filter 1 Electrical Control 1
Thermostat 1 Vibration 1
Legend:
O - Normal
X - Need Repair
RC - Repair Completed
RECOMMENDATION
Maintenance Planner
Checked By: Noted By:
AVFM
MONTHLY AIRCONDITIONING CHECKLIST
TRUCK MODEL
TRUCK ALLOW. LOAD
TRUCK OWNER
Date:
CHECK HERE CHECK HERE
r r
Slide View Mirror
r
Leaks of oil, fuel or water
r
Shift Lever(s)
r
Tire inflation pressure
FL/FR r
Loading Levers
RL/RR r
Parking brake levers
r
Hub nut torque
FL/RR r
Monitoring lamps
RL/RR r
Meters and Gauges
r
Overhead guard
r
Fuel Level
r
Brake & clutch fluid level
r
Lights and Lamps
r
Battery electrolyte level
r
Turn Signal
r
Coolant level
r
Horn button test
r
Engine Oil level
r
Clutch pedal
r
Fan belt tension
r
Brake pedal free travel
r
Rear combination lights
r
Mast test
r
Hydraulic oil level
r
Lift chain tension
r
Piping and cylinders
r
Steering handlewheel free play
r
Powershift Transmission fluid level
r
Exhaust gas condition
r
Load backrest
r
Clutch test
r
Forks and fork stoppers
r
Brake test
r
Headlights and front combination lights
r
Steering test
r
Operator's seat adjustment
r
Parking brake test
r
Back-up lamp / back-up alarm test
Legend:
m Normal l Repair completed
X Need repair T Not applicable
Checked By:
RECOMMENDATION
FORKLIFT MAINTENANCE CHECKLIST
Result of remedy found, if any,
on previous checking
AVFM
1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4
1 Material Supply
Aerzen Blower
Rotary Valve
Mixer
2 Extrusion
Twin Screw Extruder
Metering Extruder
CoExtrusion
3 Chill Roll
Chill Roll
Air Knife
WaterBath
Nip Roll
4 MDO
Dancer Roll
MACHINE/ EQUIPMENT
JAN
Lubrication Schedule
NOV DEC
No. ____________
Date : Time Started : _______
Location : Time Finished : _______
ITEM REMARKS
Prepared By: _____________ Concurred By : ________________
WORK TURN-OVER REPORT
MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT
DESCRIPTION
Cost of service provided
D
Operation of the
maintenance
dept.
Departments' Economy
Work-order progress
The amount of service
Assessment of
the service
C
F
G
MAINTENANCE PERFORMANCE
(a)
E
(b)
Manpower utilisation
M
A
I
N
T
E
N
A
N
C
E

Plant and equipment
performance
Degree of planning
B
A
MAINTENANCE PERFORMANCE
Total man-hours allowed on jobs
Total man-hours worked on same jobs
Total craft hours worked
Total craft hours clocked
Number of jobs completed
Total number of jobs handled
Job-week of delays
Number of jobs handled
Total maintenance costs
C
Total direct maint. Hrs applied
Total overhead costs
Total maintenance expenditure
Manpower efficiency =
Craft hrs utilisation =
A
B
=
=
= Completion delays
Departmental overhead
Cost of maintenance hours
Work-order turnover =
MAINTENANCE PERFORMANCE
Total downtime for service
Total stream hrs.
Hours Worked
Number of Breakdowns
Total hours on regular services
Total actual maint. Hrs
Total hours spent on breakdown
repairs
Total clocked maintenance hours
D
E
Routine services
workload
=
Breakdown
workload
=
Downtime =
Breakdown
frequency
=
MAINTENANCE PERFORMANCE
Total maintenance direct hours
Total direct production hours
Total maintenance expenditures
Number of units produced
Cost of scheduled services
Total production costs
Total cost of supplies and spares
Total maintenance expenditure
Total maintenance expenditure
Total Investment value
Maintenance costs on
investment
=
F
G
Cost of scheduled
service
=
Cost of supplies and
spares
=
Maint. To prod. Ratio =
Maintenance cost
component
=

MAINTENANCE PRACTICE
UNDER RCM

RELIABILITY CENTERED
MAINTENANCE (RCM)
REACTIVE (BREAKDOWN)
PREVENTIVE (TIME-BASED)
PREDICTIVE (CONDITION-BASED)
PROACTIVE (RELIABILITY-BASED)
GUIDELINES FOR
EQUIPMENT
MAINTENANCE
Fans:
1.Check for excessive noise and vibration.
Determine the cause and correct as
necessary.
2.Keep fan blades clean.
3.Inspect drive belts. Adjust or replace as
necessary to ensure proper operation.
Proper tensioning of belt is critical
4.Inspect and lubricate bearings regularly
5.Inspect inlet and discharge screens on
fans. They should be free of dirt and
debris at all times.
PUMPS:
1.Check for packing wear which can cause excessive
leakage. Re-pack to avoid excessive water wasted and
shaft corrosion
2.Inspect bearings and drive belts for wear and
binding. Adjust, repair or replace as necessary
AIR HANDLING UNITS (AHU):
1.Inspect duct work for air leakage.Seal all leaks by tapping or
caulking.
2.Inspect duct work insulation. Repair or replace as necessary.
3.Utilize duct work access opening to check for any obstruction such as
loose hanging insulation, loose turning vanes and accessories and
closed fire dampers. Adjust, repair or replace as necessary
4.Inspect damper blades and linkages. Clean, lubricate and adjust them
on regular basis.
5.Inspect air valves in dual duct mixing boxes to ensure full seating
and minimum air leakage.
6.Inspect mixing dampers for proper operation.
7.Clean or replace air filters on regular basis
8.Inspect cooling coils for cleanliness. Coils can be kept clean by using
a mixture of detergent and water in a high pressure portable cleaning
device
9.Inspect for leakage around the coil or out of the casing. Seal all leaks
10.Inspect all room air inlets and outlets (diffuser, grilles and register)
They should be kept clean and free from all dirt and
obstruction.Clean and remove obstruction as necessary.
COOLING TOWERS:
1.Perform chemical treatment to determine the
solid concentration are being maintained on an
acceptable level
2.Check overflow pipe clearance for proper
operating water level
3.Check fans by listening for any unusual noise or
vibration. Inspect condition of belts. Align fans
and motors as necessary.
4.Clean intake strainer.
5.Keep surrounding clean to minimize both air and
water pressure drop
6.Check spray filled or distributed tower for nozzle
performance.Clean nozzle as necessary.
7.Inspect gravity distributed tower for even water
depth in distribution basin
8.Monitor effectiveness
SUMP PUMPS:
1.When possible,check with operating personnel for any
known deficiencies
2.Clean exterior of units.
3.Check operation of the units for noise, vibration and
overheating
4.Check alignment, clearances and rotation
5.Check for leaks
6.Tighten or replace loose, missing or damage nuts, bolts
or screw coupling.
7.Clean,prime,paint any corroded or base surfaces
8.Clean or remove foreign objects from sump bottom
9.Check float, float rod and switches for proper operation
10.Lubricate pump, motor and any moving parts as
required
11.Check packing gland assembly and shaft seal
12. Make minor adjustment within allotted time to keep
unit in good operating condition

DIESEL STANDBY GENERATING SET:
1.Maintain a ten to fifteen minutes warm-up test weekly.
2.Run engine to rated no-load speed and observe for any
vibration or unusual sound
3.Observe smoke color and record
4.Check lube oil level, add or top off as necessary and
record the approximate quantity of oil added
5.Check fuel day tank level
6.Check belt tension if applicable and radiator debris
7.Check for leaks on lube oil, fuel and coolant on all
connections
8.Check battery condition including terminals and post
9.Switch on generator automatic voltage regulator for
no-load voltage and frequency

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