Guy Thistlethwaite

12th June 2012
Financial English
 Aims
 To build your vocabulary through reading and
discussion
 To develop your comprehension of financial texts
 To improve your speaking through discussion, case
studies and role plays
Regulation and deregulation –
The banking industry
1 conglomerates a abolished or ended rules and restrictions

2 depositors b sums of money paid as penalties for breaking the law

3 deregulated c groups of companies that have joined together

4 fines d control of something by rules or laws

5 prohibited e guaranteeing to buy a company's newly issued stocks if no one else does

6 regulation f made it illegal to do something

7 repealed g people who place money in bank accounts

8 underwriting h cancelled or ended (a law)

Regulation and deregulation –
The banking industry
1 conglomerates c groups of companies that have joined together

2 depositors g people who place money in bank accounts

3 deregulated a abolished or ended rules and restrictions

4 fines b sums of money paid as penalties for breaking the law

5 prohibited f made it illegal to do something

6 regulation d control of something by rules or laws

7 repealed h cancelled or ended (a law)

8 underwriting e guaranteeing to buy a company's newly issued stocks if no one else does


Put these sentences on a time-line
a) Major US banks were fined for giving bad advice
to investors
b) Commercial banks used their investors’ money
to buy securities and many depositors lost money
c) Many banking regulations were ended and big
financial conglomerates were formed
d) New laws in the US and Britain separated
commercial and investment banks
Time-line
1900 2000
Time-line
1900 2000
b
1920s
c
1980s-1990s
d
1930s
a
2002
True or false?
1. The Glass-Steagall Act was the result of the behaviour of investment
banks
2. The British and American Financial markets are now completely
unregulated
3. German and Swiss banks did all types of banking business at a time
when American and British ones were not allowed to
4. During the 20th century, many financial markets first became more
regulated, and then less regulated
5. Large American banks do no longer do the kind of things that led to
the separation of invesment and commercial banking in the 1930s
Accounting
A patient was at her doctor's office after undergoing
a complete physical exam. The doctor said, "I have
some very grave news for you. You only have six
months to live."
The patient asked, "Oh doctor, what should I do?"
The doctor replied, "Marry an accountant."
"Will that make me live longer?" asked the patient.
"No," said the doctor, "but it will SEEM longer."

Accounting
assets
cost accounting
income
tax accounting
financial accounting
expenditure
liabilities
bookkeeping
management accounting
auditing
Accounting
1. assets
2. tax accounting
3. auditing
4. cost accounting
5. financial accounting
6. liabilities
7. bookkeeping
8. Income
9. expenditure
10. management accounting

Financial statements
1 A charge for arranging a transaction [e.g. buying or selling securities]

a commission b fee c tax

2 A charge for a service performed by a bank

a commission b fee c tax

3 Payments for an insurance policy

a commissions b premiums c tariffs

4 A reduction in the value of an asset, charged against profits

a amortization b loss c waste

5 Adjective meaning after all deductions have been made

a gross b net c zero
Financial statements
1 A charge for arranging a transaction [e.g. buying or selling securities]

a commission b fee c tax

2 A charge for a service performed by a bank

a commission b fee c tax

3 Payments for an insurance policy

a commissions b premiums c tariffs

4 A reduction in the value of an asset, charged against profits

a amortization b loss c waste

5 Adjective meaning after all deductions have been made

a gross b net c zero
Financial statements
6 Adjective meaning for a whole group of companies

a consolidated b corporate c mutual

7 Adjective meaning one year or less in financial statements

a annual b long-term c short-term

8 Part-ownership [less than 50%) of other companies

a conglomeration b liabilities c minority interests

9 Things of value that cannot be physically touched, such as reputation (goodwill], brand names and
trademarks

a intangible assets b liabilities c tangible assets

10 The net worth of a company - the amount by which assets exceed liabilities

a dividends b profit c shareholders' equity

Financial statements
6 Adjective meaning for a whole group of companies

a consolidated b corporate c mutual

7 Adjective meaning one year or less in financial statements

a annual b long-term c short-term

8 Part-ownership [less than 50%) of other companies

a conglomeration b liabilities c minority interests

9 Things of value that cannot be physically touched, such as reputation (goodwill], brand names and
trademarks

a intangible assets b liabilities c tangible assets

10 The net worth of a company - the amount by which assets exceed liabilities

a dividends b profit c shareholders' equity

(1) ________________ income statement - IFRS
For the year ended 31st December
2005 (£m) 2004 (£m)
Continuing operations
Interest income 17232 13880
Interest expense -9,157 -7047
Net interest income 8075 6833
Fee and commission income 6430 5509
Fee and commission expense -725 -662
Net (2) ________________ and (3) ________________ income 5705 4847
Net trading income 2321 1487
Net investment income 858 1027
Principal transactions 3179 2514
Net (4) ________________ from insurance contracts 872 1042
Other income 147 131
Total income 17978 15367
Net claims and benefits paid on insurance contracts -645 -1259
Total income (5) ________________ of insurance claims 17333 14108
Impairment charge and other credit provisions -1571 -1093
Net income 15762 13015
Operating expenses excluding amortisation of (6)
________________ (7) ________________ 10448 8514
Amortisation of (8) ________________ (9) ________________ -79 -22
Operating expenses 10527 8536
Share of post-tax results of associates and joint ventures 45 56
Profit on disposal of associates and joint ventures 0 -45
Profit before tax 5280 4580
(10) ________________ -1439 -1279
Net profit for the year 3841 3301

Consolidated income statement - IFRS
For the year ended 31st December
2005 (£m) 2004 (£m)
Continuing operations
Interest income 17232 13880
Interest expense -9,157 -7047
Net interest income 8075 6833
Fee and commission income 6430 5509
Fee and commission expense -725 -662
Net fee and commission income 5705 4847
Net trading income 2321 1487
Net investment income 858 1027
Principal transactions 3179 2514
Net premiums from insurance contracts 872 1042
Other income 147 131
Total income 17978 15367
Net claims and benefits paid on insurance contracts -645 -1259
Total income net of insurance claims 17333 14108
Impairment charge and other credit provisions -1571 -1093
Net income 15762 13015
Operating expenses excluding amortisation of intangible assetts 10448 8514
Amortisation of intangible assets -79 -22
Operating expenses 10527 8536
Share of post-tax results of associates and joint ventures 45 56
Profit on disposal of associates and joint ventures 0 -45
Profit before tax 5280 4580
Tax -1439 -1279
Net profit for the year 3841 3301

Numbers
Financing International Trade
Discuss the following in small groups:
• What are your country's main exports?
• What are your country's main imports?
• Which countries or regions are your country's major
trading partners?
• What are the most common ways for importers to pay
exporters for goods?

España!
 Spain major imports are machinery and equipment,
fuels, chemicals, semi-finished goods, foodstuffs and
consumer goods. Its principal import partners are
European Union countries (Germany, France, Italy,
UK, Netherlands) and China
 Spain major exports are: machinery, motor vehicles,
fuels, chemicals, and semi-finished goods and
foodstuffs. Spain is also the third largest wine exporter
in the world. The EU accounts for 70 percent of Spain's
exports, the most important trading partners being
France and Germany.

How a letter of credit works
The advising bank authenticates the letter of credit and sends the beneficiary (the
seller) the details. The seller examines the details of the letter of credit to make sure
that he or she can meet all the conditions. If necessary, he or she contacts the buyer
and asks for amendments to be made.

The applicant (the buyer) completes a contract with the seller.

The issuing bank (the buyer's bank) approves the application and sends the letter of
credit details to the seller's bank (the advising bank].

The buyer fills in a letter of credit application form and sends it to his or her bank for
approval.

How a letter of credit works
1. The applicant (the buyer) completes a contract with the seller.

2. The buyer fills in a letter of credit application form and sends it to his or her bank
for approval.

3. The issuing bank (the buyer's bank) approves the application and sends the letter of
credit details to the seller's bank (the advising bank).

4. The advising bank authenticates the letter of credit and sends the beneficiary (the
seller) the details. The seller examines the details of the letter of credit to make sure
that he or she can meet all the conditions. If necessary, he or she contacts the buyer
and asks for amendments to be made.




How a letter of credit works
5. When the seller [beneficiary] is satisfied with the conditions of the letter of credit, he or she ships the
goods.

6. The seller presents the documents to his or her bankers [the advising bank]. The advising bank examines
these documents against the details on the letter of credit and the International Chamber of Commerce
rules.

7. If the documents are in order, the advising bank sends them to the issuing bank for payment or
acceptance. If the details are not correct, the advising bank tells the seller and waits for corrected documents
or further instructions.

8. The issuing bank [the buyer's bank] examines the documents from the advising bank.
If they are in order, the bank releases the documents to the buyer, pays the money promised or agrees to pay
it in the future, and advises the buyer about the payment. [If the details are not correct, the issuing bank
contacts the buyer for authorization to pay or accept the documents.] The buyer collects the goods.

9. The issuing bank advises the advising [or confirming] bank that the payment has been made.

10. The advising/confirming bank pays the seller and notifies him or her that the payment has been made.