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Identification

[Introduction and
Medicolegal Circumstances]
Nursolihah Ramly
08-6-199

Definition
the establishment (determination) of the
individuality of a living or dead person.
successful

family and friends
investigating experts
other interested
parties
pathologists, physicians
and dentists, anatomists,
physical anthropologists
and experts in evaluation
of various trace
evidences.
Types
Complete Partial
a.k.a absolute identification

incomplete identification
perfect fixation of
individuality of a person
ascertainment of only some
traits or characteristics
regarding the identity
Legal
identification
Personal
identification
Civil
identification
Criminal
identification
Medicolegal Importance
In Living Persons In Dead Persons
Medical
purposes
Civil purposes
Criminal
purposes
In impersonation or false personification cases in relation with:
Inheritance of property
Pension
Life insurance
Voting rights
Passport
Disputed sex
Disputed paternity
at marriage
on employment
call for military services

Civil purposes
Lost memory patients (true amnesia).
Unconscious patient
Those with mental confusion
C) Criminal cases:

Identification of accused in criminal offenses of assault,
murder, dacoit, sexual offenses etc.
Interchange of new born babies in hospital
to fix-up age of criminal responsibility and majority
Impersonation in criminal cases.
In kidnapping

Medical purposes
Criminal purposes
Recently dead or mutilated and decomposed bodies and in
skeletal remains.
During medicolegal examination, doctor should record at
least two identification marks and the marks should be
described in all certificates issued by him.


In Dead Persons
Missing person &
presumed dead
Mass disaster
In accidents
In crimes
To issue death
certificate & allow
burial
Latin: "body of crime"; plural: corpora delicti
referring to the principle that a crime must have been proven
to have occurred before a person can be convicted of
committing that crime.
General All corpus delicti requires at a minimum:
1) The occurrence of the specific injury
2) some intentional, knowing act as the source of the injury.
For example:
Homicide
Identification of dead body i.e. the identity of victim (i.e. the
person who had died).
Conclusive evidence that the death was caused by the
criminal act.
However, cases had occurred in which commission of crime
had been established even in absence of corpus delicti.
Corpus delicti