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Advisory Teaching Team
NET Section, EMB
Paula Pacey

Guided Reading
An effective strategy for
readers who have
developed some skills
and strategies in
reading
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Workshop Objectives:

 To introduce the key features and benefits of
Guided Reading
 To develop an understanding of the
characteristics of Beginner, Emergent and
Proficient readers and the features of suitable
books for each level
 To review ideas for a Supported Reading
lesson

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Components of a School-based
English Language Curriculum
English Language Curriculum Guide 2004 P.98
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English Language Curriculum Guide (2004) A29
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Rationale for Guided Reading
 It gives readers the opportunity to purposefully talk, read and
think their way through a new text.

 It provides a setting for good instructional teaching of the
alphabet, phonics, vocabulary, punctuation and grammar.
Children develop their awareness of styles, structures and
organizations of particular text types.

 It lets children learn and practice new strategies for making
sense of a story. They are guided to think critically about the
content.

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Guided Reading also:
 presents manageable challenges that encourage reading for
meaning

 encourages children to take control of the first reading, to give a
critical response and to talk about messages and meaning in the
text

 allows the teacher to identify areas of need and provide support
accordingly

 helps children develop positive attitudes towards reading and
motivates them to read widely and frequently
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In a Nutshell
 In guided reading, we work with a small group of
children who are at the same developmental stage of
reading

 We select an unknown or unfamiliar book that
provides just the right balance of supports and
challenges so that children can read most of it
independently (60% vocabulary known)

 Children use the reading strategies they have learnt
as they read for meaning
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Levels of Questioning
 Literal – the relevant information is found directly
from the text (on the lines)

 Interpretive – readers are required to reflect on
literal information and see relationships between
statements (between the lines)

 Inferential – readers relate own background
knowledge (beyond the lines)
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General introduction
to book topic
Students
may read
softly to
themselves,
teacher
“listens”
Meaningful
activities
related to
the book
Discussion and
reinforcing
skills
Key
steps in
Guided
reading
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How do we conduct
Guided Reading?
 Introduce the book

 Discuss the book cover and title, activate
background knowledge and experiences, and get
the readers to make predictions about the content

 Draw children’s attention to the use of words and
structures in the text

 Set the reading task and encourage children to read
part of the book silently or aloud

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What else?
 Explore the characters, plot and setting in greater
depth. Ask a variety of questions – literal, interpretive
and inferential

 Discuss the story, evaluate it, reflect on it and make
comparisons with other books

 Discuss and raise children’s awareness of the
features of different text types, including the style
organization and grammar

 Extend the story through follow-up activities

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The Reading Strategies
 Graphophonic strategies – letter shapes and sounds

 Semantic strategies – contexts

 Visual clues – picture / diagram support

 Syntactic clues – sentence patterns

 Questioning


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Activity 2: Follow–up Activity
 With a partner, use the book provided to
complete think up a follow up activity for the
book.

 Be prepared to feedback to the whole group –
focus on the activity and the level of children
for whom it would be appropriate
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Characteristics of a Beginner Reader
 Expects books to be enjoyable
 Early attempts at using pictorial and phonic clues
 Early attempts to anticipate the storyline from title and illustrations
 Can use prior knowledge to relate to texts when prompted
 Is establishing one to one matching, return sweep, and
directionality
 Recognizes some letters and words
 Recognizes and names some letters of the alphabet and shows an
awareness of letter-sound relationships and simple rhymes
 Beginning to recognize parts of a book e.g. title, cover, author and
illustrator
 Understands that the text and illustrations carry a message
 “Reading the lines”
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Features of Books
Suitable for Beginner Readers
 A close picture / text match
 Clear text with good spacing between words
 One to two lines of text in the same place on each page
 Predictable sentence patterns using natural language
 High frequency vocabulary throughout
 Gradual introduction of content (interest) words
 Rhythm and rhyme to foster phonological awareness
and familiarity with the alphabet
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Characteristics of an Emergent Reader
 Is beginning to cope with less predictable structures
within a text
 Is beginning to integrate sources of information
 Is beginning to understand that texts are written for a
variety of purposes
 Recognizes features of fiction and non-fiction text
 Recognizes and names letters of the alphabet and
shows an awareness of letter-sound relationships and
simple rhymes
 Can explain some concepts and procedures
 Beginning to understand and look for answers to
interpretive questions
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Features of Books
Suitable for Emergent Readers
 Longer, more varied sentence patterns
 Multiple lines of text per page
 An increasing number of word changes per
page
 Variation in the placement of text on the page
 A greater use of book language and different
text types
 More characters, locations and incidents
 Direct speech, ellipses and contractions
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Characteristics of a Proficient Reader
 Able to summarize & make inferences (text & pictures)
 Can identify & discuss author’s viewpoint
 Reads a variety of text-types
 Building fluency & phrasing
 Intonation, facial expression & gesture when reading
aloud
 Been exposed to inferential questions & explored
answers
 Wider knowledge of text-types
 Evaluating the text & creating ideas (e.g., role-play)
 Self-selects books from various sources
 Sustained reading on a regular basis

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Features of Books Suitable for
Proficient Readers
 Rich and varied vocabulary
 Wider variety of punctuation
 More complex sentence structures within familiar
themes
 Themes that challenge readers to think critically
 Longer storylines
 Greater use of book language and traditional story
patterns
 Greater development of events within narratives
 Inclusion of simple charts, diagrams and technical
information in non-fiction books
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Matching Students with Texts
 The texts are carefully matched to the children so they can apply
their strategies to overcome the challenges in the text and read it
independently, with success.

 Children should be able to read 9 out of 10 words and have a basic
understanding of what they read.

 Supported reading allows children to show how they manage a text
on the first reading.

 If the text is too difficult, students are prevented from problem
solving and the reading process breaks down into meaningless
word calling.



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Remember!

 When selecting books for your
reading programme, match the titles
with the suggested modules and units
for KS1 and KS2.
(ELCG 2004 P.A5)
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Choose a Balance of
Genres and Text Forms
Include both fiction - story books, realistic fiction,
multicultural folk tales, fantasy stories, poetry,
songs, rhymes

and non-fiction – newspapers, brochures, timetables,
maps, reports, recipes, diaries, letters, notes,
report cards, magazines, interviews,
encyclopedias etc.

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Curriculum Connections
 Allocate an appropriate proportion of total curriculum time (40%) to
reading activities - storytelling, reading aloud, shared reading,
supported reading and independent reading

 Introduce books of different text types and use different teaching
strategies

 Develop cross-curricular links


ELCG 2004 (A34-A35)

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Summary
Students’ input:
background,
cultural and
language
knowledge
Teacher’s input:
reading
strategies and
teaching
strategies /
skills
Proficient Readers
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Thank you!!!
The End.