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Create a PivotTable and analyze your data

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PivotTable reports are a powerful way to summarize, analyze, explore, and present your data in a report. PivotTables can help you make sense of your data, especially when you have a lot of it. This table has 800 rows. Click any cell in your data. Click Insert > Recommended PivotTables. Excel recommends PivotTable layouts that’ll work well with your data. To help you decide, pick each of the recommendations to see what your data will look like in the preview
box.
Sum of Order Amount by Salesperson is what I want, so I click OK. Excel creates the PivotTable on a new
worksheet.
The PivotTable Fields List appears to the right; we’ll cover that in the Create a PivotTable report manually video. I’m going to zoom in a little, to make the PivotTable easier to read. Right-click any cell in the Sum of Order
Amount column.
Click Number Format, pick Currency, and click OK. And the numbers in the column are formatted as
currency.
Up next: Create a PivotTable report manually.
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This table contains data about book sales. It has a column for the Genre of the books, the Date they were sold, the Sales Amount, and the Store where
they were sold.
Before you create a PivotTable, the data you’re going to use (referred to as source data) should be arranged
correctly.
All the columns should have headings. The headings are used to name the fields in the PivotTable. Each column contains the same type of data—for example, text in one column and currency in another—and there should be no blank rows or columns. For this PivotTable, we’ll use source data that’s in a table. It doesn’t have to be in a table—a range of cells can be used as well. For information about using external data, see the article Create a PivotTable to analyze external data. For information about using multiple database tables, see Create a PivotTable to analyze data in multiple
tables.
There’s a link to both articles in the course summary at the end of the course. Click any cell in the data. Click Insert > PivotTable. All of the source data is automatically selected. In this example, the entire SourceData table. We recommend using a table because, if the table grows, the PivotTable will automatically include the new data when you refresh the PivotTable. For information about creating a table, see the link Create or delete an Excel table in a worksheet in the
course summary.
By default, the PivotTable will be created on a New Worksheet. If you want, you can create it on an existing worksheet instead, by clicking Existing Worksheet and providing the Location. Click OK. In our example, a new worksheet with an empty PivotTable is created. In the PivotTable Fields List, at the top, are the fields we’ll use to create the PivotTable. They’re the same as the column headings in the source data. At the bottom are the four areas of a PivotTable the fields can be added to: Rows, Columns, Values, and
Filters.
I check the Genre field and it’s added to the PivotTable as rows of text labels. By default, text fields are added as rows and numbers as values. Check the Sales Amount field and it’s added as a column of values that are added using the SUM function. Right-click a cell in the Sum of Sales Amount column, click Number Format, and click Currency. I don’t want any digits after the decimal place, so I set Decimal places to 0, click OK, and we can see the total sales for the different genres of books. I click and drag the Store field to COLUMNS, and we can see the sales of genres for each store along with
grand totals.
An important factor we don’t have in the PivotTable yet are dates. How do sales differ over time? I check the Date field and it’s added to the ROWS area. But this many rows of dates makes the PivotTable
hard to use.
Let’s group the list of dates. Right-click any date, and click Group. I'll use the default, Months, but you can select one or more options, such as Quarters and Years. Click OK. The dates are grouped under the genres by month, much easier to work with. And we can see the sales of the genres over time for each store. When you click any cell in a PivotTable, the PivotTable Fields List and the PivotTable Tools tab appear. When you click outside of the table, they go away. Under PivotTable Tools, click the Design tab to change how the PivotTable looks. For example, click Report Layout, click Show in Outline Form, and now Genre and Date are in separate
columns.
Check Banded Rows to make it easier to read across the rows of the PivotTable. Click the down-arrow next to PivotTable Styles; there are many options. When you mouse over them, you get a preview of what the PivotTable will look like. Click the style you want to change the look of the PivotTable. We’ll cover the Analyze tab in subsequent videos. Up next: Sort, filter, summarize, and calculate your PivotTable data.
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You can analyze PivotTable data in many ways. One of the most common ways is sorting, it helps you quickly see trends in your data. Right-click a value, such as the Grand Total for the Arts & Photography genre, point to Sort, click Sort Largest to Smallest, and the Genres are sorted from the largest to smallest grand total sales
amounts.
On the Quick Access Toolbar, click Undo, to undo the sort. You can also filter your PivotTable; it helps you focus on the data you want to analyze. Click the down-arrow next to Row Labels. Since we clicked the down-arrow for a label, point to Label Filters. Click an option, such as Begins With. Type your criteria, such as the letter c, and click OK. And only genres of books that start with c are displayed. To remove the filter, click the down arrow again, it now looks like a funnel because a filter’s applied. And click Clear Filter from “Genre”. Slicers are one of the best ways to filter your PivotTable data. For information about using slicers, see the 4th video in this course— Use slicers, timelines, and PivotCharts to analyze your PivotTable data. To view only the items in your PivotTable that you want, you can select the cells that contain the items. These can be text or dates under row labels. You can't use numbers. Right-click them (genres in this example), point to Filter, click Keep Only Selected Items, and only the selected genres are displayed. To show only the 3 genres with the highest Grand Totals, right-click a genre, point to Filter, click Top 10— I know, clicking Top 10 to see the top 3 doesn’t seem to make sense, but look. Change 10 to 3, click OK, and the top three genres are displayed. Until now, the values in the PivotTable have been displayed as the sum of the Sales Amount field, but you can use other functions. For example, right-click a cell in the Grand Total column, point to Summarize Values By (there are a lot of options, such as Min and Max), click an option (such as Average), and now the values in the PivotTable are summarized as averages. You can see that the average Arts & Photography sales is $1,400. In addition to summarizing the sales figures, you can show them as a calculation. For example, right click a cell in the Grand Total column, point to Show Values As (there are a lot of options, such as % of Row Total and % of Column Total), click an option (such as % of
Grand Total),
and you can see that Arts & Photography represents a little over 10% of sales and how each store contributes to that figure. For more information about calculations in PivotTables, see the link in the course summary. Up next: Use slicers, timelines, and PivotCharts to analyze your PivotTable data.
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There are a lot of advanced tools in Excel to help you analyze your PivotTable data. You can use slicers and timelines to filter your PivotTable data, and at a glance, you can see what filters are applied. To add a Slicer, click a cell in your PivotTable, and the PivotTable Tools tab appears. Click Analyze, click Insert Slicer. The Insert Slicer dialog has options for each field in the PivotTable. Check the fields you want to slice the PivotTable with, and click OK. Adjust the size of the slicers, move them where you want, and you’re ready to slice your PivotTable. To see the Cooking and Romance books sold in October at the Bellevue and Seattle stores, in the Genre slicer, click Cooking, press the Ctrl key, and click Romance. In the Date slicer, click October. In the Store slicer, click Bellevue, press the Ctrl key, and click Seattle. And in the PivotTable, you now see just the Cooking and Romance books sold in October at the Bellevue
and Seattle stores.
To reset the slicers, click the Clear Filter button at the top right of each slicer. To add a Timeline, click a cell in your PivotTable. On the Analyze tab, click Insert Timeline. The Insert Timelines dialog has an option for each date field in your PivotTable, in this example there’s just
one.
Check the field, and click OK. Adjust the size of the timeline and move it where you want it. In the upper-right of the timeline, click drop-down arrow and choose a timeframe, such as Days. Use the slider to move along the timeline. Select the day, click an end of the selector, and drag it to cover the time period you want. And the PivotTable now displays the sales for the time period. You can use Timelines and slicers together to filter your PivotTable data. To reset the timeline, click the Clear Filter button at the top right of the timeline. PivotCharts provide a visual representation of your PivotTable, making it easier to see trends. To create a PivotChart, click a cell in your PivotTable. Click Analyze, click PivotChart. In the Insert Chart dialog, click the chart type you want... and click OK. For information about different chart types, see link in the course summary. Move the chart and make it the size you want. When you filter with the timeline and slicers, the chart
automatically updates.
Now you’ve got a pretty good idea about how to use PivotTables. Of course, there’s always more to learn. So check out the course summary at the end, and best of all, explore Excel 2013 on your own.
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Create a PivotTable to analyze
worksheet data
Being able to analyze all the data in your worksheet can
help you make better business decisions. But
sometimes it’s hard to know where to start, especially
when you have a lot of data. Excel can help you by
recommending and then automatically creating
PivotTables, which are a great way to summarize,
analyze, explore, and present your data.
1. Make sure your data has column headings or
table headers, and that there are no blank rows.
2. Click any cell in the range of cells or table.
3. Click Insert > Recommended PivotTables.
4. In the Recommended PivotTables dialog box,
click any PivotTable layout to get a preview, and
then pick the one that shows the data the way
you want, and click OK.
Create a PivotChart
A PivotChart can help you make sense of PivotTable
data. While a PivotChart shows data series, categories,
and chart axes the same way a standard chart does, it
also gives you interactive filtering controls right on the
chart so you can quickly analyze a subset of your data.
1. Click anywhere in the data.



2. On the Insert tab, in the Charts group, pick
Recommended Charts.
3. On the Recommended Charts tab, pick any chart with
the PivotChart icon in the top corner. A preview of your
PivotChart appears in the Preview pane.
4. Once you find the PivotChart you like, click OK. If you
don’t find a PivotChart you like, click PivotChart on the
Insert tab instead of Recommended Charts.
5. In the PivotChart that appears, click any interactive
control, and then pick the sort or filtering options you
want.
See also
• Create or delete an Excel table in a worksheet
• Create a PivotTable to analyze external data
• Create a PivotTable to analyze data in multiple
tables
• Show different calculations in PivotTable value
fields
• Create a PivotChart
• Available chart types
• More training courses
• Office Compatibility Pack





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