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Swine flu

H1N1
VACCINE
 THE MOST CHALLENGING
WORK FOR THE SCIENTIST TO
PREPARE A VACCINE FOR ONE
OF THE MOST THREATENED
DISEASE THICH EVOLVE AS A
PANDEMIC--------??????
EVERYBODY KNOWS-

SWINE FLU
This deadly virus neither left the
affluent society nor the peoples of
low economic class.
Virus affected gujarat chief minister
Mr. Narendra modi,
 Recently cricketer shreesanth was
admitted in P.G.I.,CHANDIGARH after
having detected swine flu positive,
President of colunbia,

President of costa rica…etc and


lots of peoples which is being
uncountable now as it exceeds
thousands…….
25 more swine flu deaths in
India take toll to 748 till
16,december with total
22,000 affected peoples
country wide
 It making our need more
intense and to be driven in
the way for vaccine
production which is only
means of prevention from
the dreadly virus.
 With the onset of winter, there has
been a sharp rise in the number of
H1N1 influenza cases worldwide.
 At present, the situation in India is
under control. With no major shift
in the nature of virus that changes
the disease profile, we can wait for
our own vaccine. It is going to be
cheaper and we will know its
efficacy as well.
 At present, we don't know to what
extent the vaccine has been able
to prevent the disease
What technologies are being
used to grow pandemic
influenza viruses to make
vaccines?

 Most of these vaccines


are being produced using
chicken eggs, while a
few manufacturers are
using cell culture
technology for vaccine
production.
Will the vaccine acts with the same
efficacy if the virus undergo change
in antigenic character----its being a
big question in minds of all the
vaccine producer?
 The Serum Institute of India (SII) has
decided to continue with its scheduled
plan of H1N1 flu vaccine development,
asserting that the point mutation in the
genetic make up of H1N1 would not
affect the vaccine efficacy.
 The point mutation of a nucleotide in the
HA region of virus is a routine
phenomenon usually seen in influenza
virus pandemics. Such mutation has
already been considered in vaccine
development. The point mutation is too
small to affect the efficacy of the
vaccine,"
Who will be recommended to
receive the 2009 H1N1 vaccine?
 Those target groups include pregnant
women, people who live with or care for
infants younger than 6 months of age,
healthcare and emergency medical
services personnel with direct patient
contact, infants 6 months through young
adults 24 years of age (especially children
younger than 5 years of age), and adults
through 64 years of age who are at higher
risk for 2009 H1N1 complications because
of chronic health disorders or
compromised immune systems
How many doses of vaccine
are required?
 FDA has approved the one dose of 2009 H1N1 flu
vaccine for people 10 years of age and older. For
children LESS than 10 years of age, two doses of
the 2009 H1N1 flu vaccine is needed .CDC’s
recommendations for seasonal influenza
vaccination which states that children younger
than 9 who are being vaccinated against
influenza for the first time need to receive two
doses. Infants younger than 6 months of age are
young to get the 2009 H1N1 and seasonal flu
vaccine
What is the recommended interval
between the first and second dose
of 2009 H1N1 vaccine for children
younger than 10 years of age?

 CDC recommends that the two


doses of 2009 H1N1 vaccine be
separated by 4 weeks. However, if
the second dose is separated from
the first dose by at least 21 days,
the second dose can be
considered valid.
What kind of testing is being
done to ensure safety?
 Because the pandemic virus is new, both non-
clinical and clinical testing is being done to
gain essential information on immune response
and safety. The results of studies reported to
date suggest the vaccines are as safe as
seasonal influenza vaccines. However, even
very large clinical studies will not be able to
identify possible rare events that can become
evident when pandemic vaccines are
administered to many millions of people.

 WHO advises all countries administering


pandemic vaccines to conduct intensive
monitoring for safety and report serious
adverse events.
Do those that have been
previously vaccinated against
the 1976 swine influenza need
to get vaccinated against the
2009 H1N1 influenza?
 The 1976 swine flu virus and
the 2009 H1N1 virus are
different enough that it's
unlikely a person vaccinated in
1976 will have full protection
from the 2009 H1N1. People
vaccinated in 1976 should still
be given the 2009 H1.
What type of vaccine it is?

 Both the flu shot (in the


arm) and nasal spray
form of 2009 H1N1
vaccines have now been
produced and licensed
by the Food and Drug
Administration.
Are pandemic vaccines
safe?
 Outcomes of studies completed
to date suggest that pandemic
vaccines are as safe as seasonal
influenza vaccines. Side effects
seen so far are similar to those
observed with seasonal
influenza vaccines.
 Three Indian pharmaceutical companies
- Bharat Biotech, Panacea
Pharmaceuticals and Serum Institute of
India - were given the seed virus by the
health ministry to develop the vaccine.
"They, too, are almost ready with the
vaccine and are at present conducting
animal trials. We hope that by
December end or the first week of
January, these three companies will get
the nod to conduct human trials. We
will have our own vaccine by March
next year,

 The human clinical trials of the H1N1


vaccine will be carried out in
Ahmedabad, Delhi and Pune
immediately after obtaining permission
from the Drugs Controller General of
India (DCGI).
 With more than 20,000 H1N1 cases
in India, the central administration
has started discussions with 4
global vaccine makers to import
the swine flu vaccine.
 "The government is exploring the
possibility of importing the H1N1
vaccines and anticipating early
release of foreign made vaccines.
 HOPING
OUR
VACCINE WILL
RELEASE
SOON……………

 WHAT TO DO
TILL
THEN………??????
BEST WAY TO PREVENT SPREAD
OF VIRUS FROM PATIENTS
BEST WAY TO PREVENT YOURSELF TILL
YHE VACCINE COMES
THANKING YOU

Hemendra agrawal