You are on page 1of 14

Check Sheet Implementation

Utilizing Check Sheets to Improve Quality


Contents
Check Sheets Defined
Brainstorming Exercise
Creating Check Sheets
How they work
Benefits/Problems
Real World Example
Practice Exercise
Check Sheets Defined
What is a check sheet?
A basic tool for monitoring quality
improvement processes
A simple data collection device
There are two varieties of check
sheets
Tabular Example
Schematic Example1
Check Sheets Defined
Common Types
Distribution Check Sheets
Used to collect data in order to determine
how a variable is dispersed within an area
of possible occurrences
Location Check Sheets
Highlights the physical location of a
problem/defect in order to improve quality
They may also utilize visual(schematic)
drawings of areas in order to record where
problems are occurring
Check Sheets Defined
Common Types, Continued
Cause Check Sheets
Used to keep track of how often a problem
happens or records the cause to a certain
problem.
Classification Check Sheets
Used to keep track of the frequency of
major classifications involving the delivery
of products or services
Optional
Brainstorming Exercise
Creating a Check Sheet
In groups of three to five people,
brainstorm a simple process, which
can be internal or external of the
organization, and create a list of
questions that should be answered by
the check sheet process.
Creating Check Sheets
Step One
Identify the question
Develop and understand the question(s) that
need to be answered before the data
collection process
Step Two
Identify potential problem areas
Outline the production process
Figure out the potential processes that could
be causing defects
Get employees involved who know the
processes well
Creating Check Sheets
Step Three
Tracking problems/defects
Construct a tabular or schematic
diagram in order to track problems in
production processes
Step Four
Recording problems/defects
Physically record every instance that a
problem/defect is encountered
Benefits
Efficiency/Speed
Systematic and Organized
Ease of use/Simplicity
Can be used in conjunction with
other charts and diagrams for a
more in depth analysis
Problems
Data Inaccuracies
Check Sheet Biases
Exclusion
Interaction
Perception
Operational
Nonresponse
Estimation

Real World Example
Mitsubishi Motors
http://www.mitsubishi-
motors.co.jp/inter/NEWS/0010-03/n001020.html
Mitsubishi motors has defects in several
car models and they use check sheets to
track the defects in order to improve
their production processes
The check sheet link is
http://www.mitsubishi-
motors.co.jp/inter/NEWS/0010-
03/n010215a.html
Check Sheet Exercise
Creating a Check Sheet
In groups of three to five people, choose a
simple process, which can be internal or
external of your organization, and create a
check sheet that would seem most
appropriate for the process you chose.
The design of the check sheet is to be
determined by the group.
Refer to previous examples for ideas of how or
where to begin if necessary.
Paper clip experiment
Summary
Check Sheets should be easy to use
Since data is gathered quickly, simplicity
reduces margin for error.
As a rule of thumb, keep it simple
Only record relevant data
Use Check Sheets for quick analysis
Do not try to make general assumptions from
data that is collected. In order for a more
detailed analysis, data needs to be grouped by
region, machine, process, etc. and should be
used in conjunction with other quality tools.

Bibliography
Sources for more information
Quality Progress Magazine
An excellent source for just about any quality
related issue you can think of, there are many
great articles that are available in past issues
that continue to be used by modern
organizations as well as many new ideas for
quality improvement
www.qualityamerica.com
Contains training, software and other
information as well as an online store for
many quality improvement devices
www.freequality.org
Free website for many quality training and
improvement sources