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Architectural Synopsis

Museum
A Non-profit making permanent
institution in the service of society and
of its development and opens to the
public which acquires, conserves,
researches, communicates and
exhibits for the purpose of study,
education, employment and material
evidence of man and his environment.
Earliest organized Museum was
established in Alexandria, Egypt in 3
rd

cen. BC
For a long time after this, no proper
museum development took place
In the 14
th
Cen. BC, after renaissance,
there was a revival in the interest of
Museum
First public museum opened in
Oxford in 1683
It was followed by British Museum in
1753
1
st
phase from 14
th
up to 17
th
cent.
Storing the objects of artistic and scientific
interest
2
nd
phase- 18
th
and 19
th
cent.
Many of the museums were taken over by the
state which turned them into public
institutions
3
rd
phase 20
th
cent.
Assumed an educational role
4
th
phase-since1970
More concerned with entertainment, tourism
and income generation
FINE ARTS
ARCHITECTURE
ENCYCLOPEDIC
SCI & TECH
ETYMOLOGY MEMORIAL
WAR AND HISTORY MARITIME
ZOOLOGY
National museum

State museums

University college
and school museums

Private Museums
Importance of Architecture in museums
The important objects in the collection must be preserved, and preservation often
requires very specific environments.

The environment must be comfortable for people, enabling their movement through the
space and providing for their safety.

Museum architecture is designed to make a statement about the community.

A museum must have adequate space to store the collection of objects that it houses.

Museum architecture must be designed to provide a climate that will preserve the
objects, controlling temperature, humidity, and light.

Sometimes different objects require different conditions, so museum architecture may
have to provide different specialized climates within the same building.

Work space for preservation and restoration must be included .
Creating a Museum space
Museum Requirements
User Circulation
Display and storage
Administration
Access and services
Spatial Programming
Place Making
(Interaction with built up area &
surrounding)
Logical comprehension of interrelationship among various activities
of Museum.

Analysing different patterns of interaction of
Exhibition layout and museum building design.

Satisfying all the aspects of design like Bioclimate, daylighting,
natural ventilation, intelligent systems, construction technology,
acoustics and cost analysis.

Striving for maximum efficacy in Museum Experience.

1. Open plan: Large and visually
autonomous items on display, free
circulation, Function rooms in
basement

2. Core and satellite rooms:
Main room for the orientation in the
museum or the exhibition, side
rooms, for autonomous
displays(themes/collections)

3. Linear chaining: linear
sequences of rooms, continued
circulation, clear orientation,
separate entrance and exit.

4. Labyrinth: free circulation,
guided route and directions are
variable, entrance and exit can be
separate.

5. Complex: combined groups of
rooms with typical features of 1. and
4., complex organisation of
collection and display concept.

6. Round tour: similar to linear
chaining, controlled circulation leads
back entrance.





Entrance
Orientation
Cloak room
Pay desk
WC

Cafe, bar
Restaurant
shop
Conference
rooms
Permanent
exhibition,
Temporary
exhibition
Library
Lecture hall
Director
Administration
Catalogues
Copy rooms
Library Archive
Store

Restoration
And
conservation
workshops

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Private area
Public, Controlled area









Ordering of spaces into sequences
and morphology of exploration.



Genotypic theme: the organization of
spaces in a visitable sequence and
the gathering space, the recurrent
space in the sequence.

The display layout must exploit the qualities of the setting in order to
maximize the impact of the objects. A distinguishing spatial quality of the
museums and a consistent property of their display, is cross-visibility, aiming
on the one hand, to create a visual effect and on the other hand, to operate as
a powerful means for mediating additional relationships between works,
multiplying affinities and cross-references.
The visual experience exist to generate something new - new relations, new
ideas, new encounter patterns. This is, what essentially differentiates them
from the previously discussed cases which exist to reproduce.

As it will be made clear, the reason for this is that, in contrast
to the long models which tend to resemble one another, short models tend to
individualization.
This close link between design choices
and display decisions can extend beyond
the aesthetic and visual aspect, and that
syntactic (spatial) and semantic (objects)
aspects of the layout seem in some kind
of a relation of correspondence,
meaning that we understand the relation
of works of art by the proximity and the
relation of spaces.