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PHYSICS 1710.

001
MWF 9:009:50 a.m.

Dr. Yuankun Lin


Associate Professor
(working on nano-photonics, and 3D nanofabrication using lasers)
Physics Bldg., Room 323
(940) 565-4548
yuankun.lin@unt.edu
Office Hours: MWF 9:50-10:30 am, and by appointment

Course Orientation
1. Laboratory
2. Course Syllabus
1. Online homework-Masteringphysics
2. Response Cards

Textbook, response card, online


homework
Textbook: University Physics, 13th Edition, by Young and
Freedman.
Hardcover text with MasteringPhysics access
3-hole punched edition with MasteringPhysics access
MasteringPhysics access including e-book for Young/Freedman
Responsive Innovations Response Card, Part No. RCRF-01,
distributed by Turning Technologies, LLC
Homework: www.masteringphysics.com

Attendance/Participation:
5% of your grade will depend upon your attendance and participation in class.
You will be expected to bring your Response Card with you to class, and participate
in answering in-class questions.
(Never bring other clickers to help others. I will randomly call names and check.
Both students will lose 5% with a false clicker response)

If your card is not working, write down your name in a piece of paper and hand it in
to me after class
Laptop computers are not allowed in the class room

If you miss a class, you will be confused with new lecture materials and feel
boring and frustrated in the class

UNT policy on non-attendance


Students might be dropped from this course due to
their non-attendance.
Last day for instructors to drop a student for the nonattendance (WF) is: Nov 21, 2014.

Exams:
26-Sep, Exam 1Ch. 1-4, 4:00-5:30 PM, ART 223
24-Oct, Exam 2Ch. 5-8, 4:00-5:30 PM, ART 223 (there is a
typo for the date in your printed syllabus)
21-Nov, Exam 3Ch. 9, 10, 14, 15, 4:00-5:30 PM, ART 223
comprehensive final exam, 4:00 -6:00 p.m. on Monday,
December 8, location: TBA
There will be no makeup exams.
You must show all of your work on your exam papers for
full credit.

Copy from students exam

equation
number
answer

Equation is right, answer is wrong


===Partial credit

A correct answer without steps=== zero credit

Grading policy, example


1st exam 15%; 2nd exam 15%; 3rd exam 15%; 30% for the final; 5%
additional weighting will be given for your best exam.
Homework 10%
5% for lecture participation
Exam 1 Exam 2 Exam 3 Final
5% for recitation quizzes
67
98
108
82

Total 100%
15%

15% 15+5%

Lab Credit: You must enroll separately in Physics 1730 for


laboratory science credit.

30%

Online Homework 10%


What You Need:
A valid email address
A student access code (Comes in the Student Access Kit
that may have been packaged with your new textbook or
you can purchase access online at
www.masteringphysics.com.)
The ZIP code for your school: 76203
A Course ID: UNTPHYS1710LIN2014
See syllabus for details

Homework grading policy:


Some HW problems are required to hand in a written
solution
If you have earned computer credit for a problem, you
must hand in written solution and show sufficient work in
your written HW to retain that credit.
If a online solution is wrong, correctness of the written
solution can help you receive up to 90% of full credit.

Written homework solution


Hand in neatly written solutions in the mailbox
labeled 1710 Lin near the south end of the
2nd floor hallway in the Physics Building by the
same due date and time as for the online
homework.

Response card

Registration of response card


You must provide the instructor with the sixcharacter alpha-numeric code located on the
back of your keypad, immediately
underneath the bar code

You must set the keypad channel to match


that of the receiver in the lecture hall.
Press GO causing the keypad LED to blink
red-green, press 3 and 3, then press go
again.

Registration of response card

Login learn.unt.edu
Select course PHYS1710
Click course content
Click

Click Register ResponseCard Device ID


And enter the six-character code.

The code dont contain o (it is zero).

Testing your response card.


Press GO causing the keypad LED to blink redgreen, press 3 and 3, then press go again.

1. Yes
2. No
3. Dude! Not completely
0%
1.

0%
2.

0%
3.

Recitation Sections 204, 208, 209,


TA instructor
Recitation 5%
Recitation sections meets starting from
Wednesday this week
TA will solve all HW problems in recitation
Attending recitation helps you receive 5% for
recitation itself and 10% for finished HW, and
improve your exam score

PHYS 1710 tutorial sessions


Office hours of six 1710/2220 TAs are integrated
with PIC tutorial sessions
Location: PIC (Second floor in Physics Building)
Will post schedule online. The schedule will cover
all week-days from Morning to Evening.

Difficulty of PHYS 1710


One of the most difficult course in all Universities

Finish your homework


Read your textbook and bring questions to lecture
Finish old exams posted @blackboard

We are working together for a grade of A

Chap 1
Units,
Physical Quantities,
and Vectors

Standards of Quantities
Standardized systems
agreed upon by some authority, usually a
governmental body

SI Systme International
agreed to in 1960 by an international committee
main system used in this text

Fundamental Quantities and Their


Units
Quantity

SI Unit

Length

meter

Mass

kilogram

Time

second

Temperature

Kelvin

Electric Current

Ampere

Quantities Used
In mechanics, three basic quantities are used
Length
Mass
Time

Will also use derived quantities


These are other quantities can be expressed in
terms of these

Length
Units
SI meter, m

Defined in terms of a meter the distance


traveled by light in a vacuum during a given
time of 1/299 792 458 second

Mass
Units
SI kilogram, kg

Defined in terms of a kilogram, based on a


specific cylinder kept at the International
Bureau of Standards

Standard Kilogram

Time
Units
seconds, s

Defined in terms of the oscillation of


radiation from a cesium atom

US Official Atomic Clock

Prefixes.
Prefixes correspond to
powers of 10
The prefixes can be
used with any base
units
They are multipliers of
the base unit
Examples:
1 mm = 10-3 m
1 mg = 10-3 g

Conversion of Units
When units are not consistent, you may need
to convert to appropriate ones
Units can be treated like algebraic quantities
that can cancel each other out

Conversion
Always include units for every quantity, you
can carry the units through the entire
calculation
Multiply original value by a ratio equal to one
Example

Uncertainty in Measurements
There is uncertainty in every measurement this
uncertainty carries over through the calculations
May be due to the apparatus, the experimenter,
and/or the number of measurements made
Need a technique to account for this uncertainty

We will use rules for significant figures to


approximate the uncertainty in results of
calculations

Significant Figures
A significant figure is one that is reliably
known
Zeros may or may not be significant
Those used to position the decimal point are not
significant
To remove ambiguity, use scientific notation

In a measurement, the significant figures


include the first estimated digit

Significant Figures, examples


0.0075 m has 2 significant figures
The leading zeros are placeholders only
Can write in scientific notation to show more clearly: 7.5 x
10-3 m for 2 significant figures

10.0 m has 3 significant figures


The decimal point gives information about the reliability of
the measurement

1500 m is ambiguous
Use 1.5 x 103 m for 2 significant figures
Use 1.50 x 103 m for 3 significant figures
Use 1.500 x 103 m for 4 significant figures

Operations with Significant Figures


Multiplying or Dividing
When multiplying or dividing, the number of
significant figures in the final answer is the
same as the number of significant figures in
the quantity having the lowest number of
significant figures.
Example: 25.57 m x 2.45 m = 62.6 m2
The 2.45 m limits your result to 3 significant
figures

Operations with Significant Figures Adding or


Subtracting
When adding or subtracting, the number of
decimal places in the result should equal the
smallest number of decimal places in any term
in the sum.
Example: 135 cm + 3.25 cm = 138 cm
The 135 cm limits your answer to the units
decimal value

Vectors and Scalars


A scalar quantity is completely specified by a
single value with an appropriate unit and has
no direction.
A vector quantity is completely described by a
number and appropriate units plus a
direction.

Vector Notation

When handwritten, use an arrow:


When printed, will be in bold print: A
When dealing with just the magnitude of a vector in
print, an italic letter will be used: A or |A|
The magnitude of the vector has physical units
The magnitude of a vector is always a positive
number

Learn to use Vector


Two-dimensional or three-dimensional
motions will use the vector concept
Warning: Lots of students could not solve 2D
or 3D motion problems due to difficulty in
vector

Equality of Two Vectors


Two vectors are equal
if they have the same
magnitude and the
same direction
A = B if A = B and they
point along parallel
lines
All of the vectors
shown are equal

Adding Vectors
When adding vectors, their directions must be
taken into account
Units must be the same
Graphical Methods
Use scale drawings

Algebraic Methods
More convenient

Adding Vectors Graphically

Subtracting Vectors

Adding or Subtracting Vectors


Algebraically
Two methods:
Use law of cosines, law of sines
or
Use component method (generally preferred)

Components of a Vector
A component is a part
It is useful to use rectangular
components
These are the projections of the
vector along the x- and y-axes
Ax and Ay are the component
vectors of A

Components of a Vector, 2
The x-component of a vector is the projection
along the x-axis:
The y-component of a vector is the projection
along the y-axis:

Then, A = AX + AY

Components of a Vector, 3
To obtain the original
vector from its
components, we can
add them as shown
graphically here:
(Remember that the
order of addition is
not important.)

Components of a Vector, 4
The previous equations are valid only if is
measured with respect to the x-axis
The components are the legs of the right triangle
whose hypotenuse is A

May still have to find with respect to the positive x-axis

Unit Vectors
A unit vector is a dimensionless vector with a
magnitude of exactly 1.
Unit vectors are used to specify a direction
and have no other physical significance

Unit Vectors, cont.


The symbols i, j, and k
represent unit vectors
They form a set of
mutually
perpendicular vectors

Unit Vectors in Vector Notation


Ax is the same as Ax
and Ay is the same as
Ay etc.
The complete vector
can be expressed as

Adding Vectors Using Unit Vectors


Using R = A + B
Then

and so Rx = Ax + Bx and Ry = Ay + By

Find the sum of A = 2i + 5j k and


B = 4i - 2j + 7k.
1.
2.
3.
4.

6i + 9k
6i + 7j + 8k
6i + 3j + 6k
8i - 10j - 7k

Response
Counter

0%
1

0%

0%

0%
4

A = 2i + 5j k
B = 4i - 2j + 7k
Find R=3A+2B?
3A=3(2i+5j-k) = 6i+15j -3k
2B=2(4i-2j+7k) = 8i -4j+14k
R=14i+11j+11k

Fall 2011 exam question

Dot product
answer: scaler
A=Axi+Ayj+Azk
B=Bxi+Byj+Bzk

A dot B=AxBx+AyBy+AzBz

Consider the two vectors


A=3i+4j
B=-8i+6j
What is the dot product AB
A. zero

B. 14
C. 48
D. 50
E. none of these

Consider the two vectors


A=3i-4j
B=6k
What is the dot product AB
A. zero

B. 6
C. +6
D. 42

E. 42

2012 exam question

Cross product
right hand rule

A B=|A | |B | sin
is the angle between A and B
i i=0
i j=k
j j=0
j k=i
k k=0
k i=j
j i=-k
k j=-i
i k=-j

Cross product, my rule

i j k i j k i j ki j k
Next Neighbor
Left to right, +,

right to left, -

Cross product
answer still vector

Very often it is not necessary to use determinant


formula
A simple math can do (see next slide)

Consider the two vectors


A=3i+4j
B=-8i+6j

What is the cross product AB


=3 i(-8i+6j)+4 j(-8i+6j)

=18k-32(-k)=50 k
A. +6k
B. -6k
C. 50k
D. -50k

E. none of these

Consider the two vectors


A=3i-4j
B=6k
What is the dot product AB
A. zero

B. 24i+18j
C. -24i-18j
D. 18i-24j

E. 18i-24j

What is the highest level of math course


youve completed?
1.
2.
3.
4.

Pre-calculus
1st semester calculus
2nd semester calculus
Multivariable
calculus
5. Differential
equations

20%

20%

20%

20%

20%

Fall 2011 Exam question


Direction???

Fall 2011 Exam question


Direction???

Or using right hand rule


r

Cartesian Coordinate System


common in this course
x- and y- axes
intersect at the origin
Points are labeled (x,y)
Four regions, called
quadrants

(-,+)

(+,+)

(-,-)

(+,-)

Cartesian Coordinate System


common in this course
Vector OP=(5,3)
Or OP=5 i+ 3 j
(-,+)

(+,+)

Vector OQ=(-3, 4)

Vector QP=OP-OQ
=(5, 3)-(-3,4)
=(8, -1)
Which region is the vector QP
located (+,-)
(-,-)

Which region is the vector QP


located
(-,+)

(+,+)

(-,-)

(+,-)

Vector QP=(8, -1)


In region IV

The head of the vector in region IV

Example
Starting from his house, a boy walks 10 m
along a street 30 North of East, walks 20
m toward the East, and then walks 5 m
towards the North. Whats the straight
distance of the boy from his house?

Using vectors
calculate vector component
Starting from his house, a boy walks 10 m along a street 30 North of East, walks 20 m
toward the East, and then walks 5 m towards the North. Whats the straight distance of
the boy from his house?

10

5
20

by adding vectors
R=A+B+C
Starting from his house, a boy walks 10 m along a street 30 North of East, walks
20 m toward the East, and then walks 5 m towards the North. Whats the straight
distance of the boy from his house?

A=10 cos 30 i+10 sin30 j


B= 20 i+0 j
C= 0 i+ 5 j
A

C
B

The law of cosines


Adding vectors

Subtracting vectors

The law of sines

2012 exam question

2012 exam question